Jump to content
JimGullen

Clutch Pushrod...

Recommended Posts

JimGullen

Good afternoon!

 

I'm working on a clutch replacement on my R1150RT. I've gotten the clutch slave cylinder off, but the pushrod doesn't want to come out.

 

I can feel a little play in the pushrod, but I cannot remove it with two fingers,

 

I'm hesitant to put a pair of pliers on it.

 

Is this common? Any techniques that have proven successful?

 

Many thanks for any suggestions and best regards!

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
dirtrider
Good afternoon!

 

I'm working on a clutch replacement on my R1150RT. I've gotten the clutch slave cylinder off, but the pushrod doesn't want to come out.

 

I can feel a little play in the pushrod, but I cannot remove it with two fingers,

 

I'm hesitant to put a pair of pliers on it.

 

Is this common? Any techniques that have proven successful?

 

Many thanks for any suggestions and best regards!

 

Jim

 

Afternoon Jim

 

Yes, common.

 

There is a felt strip wound around a depression in the push rod & that felt can stick pretty good.

 

I have a set of modified hose clamp plies that I use to yank the push rod out.

 

Whatever you use just be sure that it is smooth jawed enough so won't damage the push rod.

 

Share this post


Link to post
The Fabricator

If it doesn't spin, it is 'welded' to the pressure plate. When my rear transmission seal failed [2000 R1150GS], I tried to pull the rod out. I fabricated a collet: steel rod, drill hole the same size as rod, split the rod axially with a hack saw, clamp vice grips on the split portion so it clamps the rod. I used a pribar against the vice grip to pull on the rod. I would estimate 200 lbs force. It didn't budge. Collet slipped off.

And yes, I only discovered the leaking seal when the clutch started slipping. I managed to replace the seal with the rod in place. I lubed the slave bearing generously [already trans oil lubed], washed the friction plate off through the starter [removed] hole with a can of carb cleaner. It doesn't slip too bad. I cut the slave gasket for a drainage channel. I'll drill a hole in the cavity one day. Probably the same day I replace the friction plate and push rod.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
fatbob

If you are replacing the clutch then you will remove the transmission. Pull the rod out of the front of the transmission after you remove it.

Share this post


Link to post
Alan Sykes

"The Fabricator" is quite correct. The shouldered part of the far end of the push-rod can weld itself to the clutch-release diaphragm spring-plate.

 

The split felt-sleeve rattle-killer ( it's not a lube-barrier ) that DR mentions can indeed stick, but not so hard that a determined yank on the end of the rod with the Mole Grips doesn't pull it out. Trouble with Mole Grips though is they chew into the rounded end of the rod that locates into the paltry slave-cylinder bearing.

 

So the only way to retrieve /repair or to replace the damaged rod is to split the bike as you would for a full clutch-job and pull the rod out from the crankcase end.

 

When replacing the rod, always Staburags the locating tip of the rod, the end that goes into the clutch pack / crankshaft / flywheel, plus give a wipe of the stuff on the shouldered part, and indeed another wipe on the slave-cylinder-bearing end. Starburags is one of the wonder-products of the modern lubrication industry. That's why it costs an arm-and-a-leg.

 

Al - currently in the Divided Kingdom over the festive period. Anything to avoid having a lamb-shank roast on Christmas Day in a deserted Spanish restaurant. I'm an inveterate roast turkey / Brussels Sprouts / roast parsnips / cranberry sauce / roast spuds / pigs-in-blankets sort of guy, followed by Christmas Brandy Pudding with brandy white-sauce / rum trifle / port and Christmas cake. Followed by "The Queen" on network TV and then into Casualty for open-heart surgery.

Share this post


Link to post
dirtrider

Morning __

 

We haven't heard back from Jim so he probably has his situation figured out.

 

This is more written for future readers.

 

If there is some play or movement in the push rod (feels a bit loose in the fore/aft direction or can be turned) then it isn't welded to the diaphragm spring (it can't weld itself to the pressure plate as the pushrod does not contact the pressure plate).

 

If there IS play or movement in the push rod then it will come out the rear with some pulling force. Or, as mentioned above, the transmission can be removed with the push rod still inside the input shaft then removed later.

 

If there is no play or movement in the push rod then Do Not try to remove the transmission with the push rod in place as it is probably stuck in the diaphragm spring seat & you will more than likely bend the $60.00+ push rod when removing the transmission.

 

If the push rod is severely stuck in the diaphragm spring seat then you can TRY to slide the transmission straight back over the push rod without bending the push rod (sometimes it works & most times it doesn't) or (with starter removed) try to unbolt the clutch housing cover through the starter hole then slide the trans back with the clutch parts hanging on the front.

Share this post


Link to post
JimGullen

Thanks, all!

 

Yes, I do have this sorted. I very much appreciate all of the information.

 

The additional context/information will be useful in the future.

 

Best regards!

 

Jim

 

Share this post


Link to post
Craig G.

To those researching prior to doing the work I can assure you that sliding the g'box rearward with the stuck pushrod in place works everytime without damaging the pushrod if care is taken.... not just sometimes. It should be obvious that care should be taken to not load or deflect the rod until the g'box clears. I don't fight stuck pushrods anymore...

Share this post


Link to post
AndyS

Very long guide dowels.

Share this post


Link to post
fatbob
Very long guide dowels.

 

ðŸ‘

Share this post


Link to post
Andre1150
On 12/16/2018 at 1:35 PM, The Fabricator said:

If it doesn't spin, it is 'welded' to the pressure plate. When my rear transmission seal failed [2000 R1150GS], I tried to pull the rod out. I fabricated a collet: steel rod, drill hole the same size as rod, split the rod axially with a hack saw, clamp vice grips on the split portion so it clamps the rod. I used a pribar against the vice grip to pull on the rod. I would estimate 200 lbs force. It didn't budge. Collet slipped off.

And yes, I only discovered the leaking seal when the clutch started slipping. I managed to replace the seal with the rod in place. I lubed the slave bearing generously [already trans oil lubed], washed the friction plate off through the starter [removed] hole with a can of carb cleaner. It doesn't slip too bad. I cut the slave gasket for a drainage channel. I'll drill a hole in the cavity one day. Probably the same day I replace the friction plate and push rod.

 

Does it work with a split in the rod? damage to the end that sits in the clutch slave bearing face? or did you attempt to smooth everything out before reassembly?

Share this post


Link to post
Lowndes

 

"Does it work with a split in the rod? damage to the end that sits in the clutch slave bearing face? or did you attempt to smooth everything out before reassembly?"

 

Andre1150,

 

I think he was referring to splitting the collet he made.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...