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YouTube 12000Mile/20000Km RTW Service Video Series


Boxflyer

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I thought this might be worth posting up for the group if anyone is considering undertaking the scheduled maintenance on their own bike. (Wethead)

We filmed this over 2 days in October at the end of the riding season up North. I had my ridding buddy (Chris on the Streed) on the camera, while I spun the wrenches.

Its long! which was our intention. Many folks may have already done this service, but some may prefer to let the dealership do it. We followed the service schedule sheet pretty much, plus some added checks and observations along the way. (I hope to do a follow-up video soon with all the minor points).

I've done this service 6 times on the Wethead and maybe 20 times on Hex/Cam Heads, so I hope that you enjoy watching the series.

 

Boxflyer

 

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I'm thinking of doing a Wethead Tech Day in the spring up in our mutual area if there is enough interest.

Just need a suitable location with a lift, and space for a small group.

I did a similar Wethead Tech Day up in Halifax NS. in October and it was well received.

Seeing it in real time, first hand, can help determine if this is something a handy owner would want to undertake. 🔧

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I'm thinking of doing a Wethead Tech Day in the spring up in our mutual area if there is enough interest.

Just need a suitable location with a lift, and space for a small group.

I did a similar Wethead Tech Day up in Halifax NS. in October and it was well received.

Seeing it in real time, first hand, can help determine if this is something a handy owner would want to undertake. 🔧

 

That's the one thing that sucks about being in North Dakota. None of the tech days are ever anywhere close.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Seems that several locations have been unable to ship the OEM Cam Timing Tension Tool for a couple of months now.

 

In an effort to come up with a solution, I have made a YouTube Video of a DIY replacement for BMW #83300444292. 

Hope this helps.

 

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I don't have a wethead and I've never seen the factory tension tool, but this does not look like a trustworthy replacement.

 

It seems you are substituting a fixed tube for a spring that is compressed to provide a specific amount of tension. If there is chain stretch or other wear,  a 44mm spacer will no longer provide the correct amount of chain tension.  Or there could be manufacturing differences that would make that 44mm incorrect for another engine, or even the other cylinder on the same engine. 

 

 :dontknow:  Maybe I'm misunderstanding how the tensioner works...

 

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Sorry you didn't see what the original OEM Tool does.  It fits into where the normal running cam chain tensioner goes and is extended to exert a specific, non spring type of force on the return side of the cam drive chain in order to pull the tensioned sided tight.

This makes the valve train similar to the running condition with working oil pressure, and allows you to check the orientation of the cams to each other and to the TDC notch in the alternator rotor reference...

There are LOTS of moving parts involved in this cam timing check, but once it's checked/set, experience shows that it doesn't change much at all from chain stretch, or any gearing changing, so the cams may not need to be adjusted for several service intervals.

 

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1 hour ago, Boxflyer said:

Sorry you didn't see what the original OEM Tool does.  It fits into where the normal running cam chain tensioner goes and is extended to exert a specific, non spring type of force on the return side of the cam drive chain in order to pull the tensioned sided tight.

 

 

That's pretty much what I'm seeing.  At ~4:20 you are running in the rod in the factory tool to achieve a pressure on the chain equal to what the tensioner exerts via oil pressure. When the chain tension is correct, the clutch on the knurled ring reaches it's torque limit, slips, clicks, and stops extending the rod. The torque limit on that knurled ring is designed to slip to provide a specific, repeatable pressure on the chain, regardless of how far the rod has to extend. Many micrometers have a similar knurled knob to achieve repeatable pressure for consistent measurements.

 

You then measure the rod length and duplicate it, which is the correct length to tension THAT chain at THAT time.  How would you determine that length if you did not already have the factory tool?  If 44mm is the correct spacer length for all wethead cam chains, the whole tool could be replaced by a plain bolt of a suitable length. It seems you are trying to replace a tool intended to apply a specific force with a tool that only sets a length

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You are exactly correct.  I'm going to be checking this exact length on 3 other WetHeads that I help service and establish that this is a good length for engines other than just my one example.

It's kinda cold for riding around here in New England, so it may take awhile to get to the other bikes to break them open to get more data.

 

Thanks for your thoughts to challenge this DIY effort, it will help the overall evolution of this replacement for the OEM tool that is not in stock now.

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I've been trying to work in my cold garage to get answers to the concerns about the previous error of my first technique.

Thanks for all the brain power going into this, and after getting over to the LH cylinder to check it with the DIY tool, have found that it needs 2mm more extension on the OEM tool to make the "3 clicks" establish correct tension.

I tried the first "stick pen" insert of 48mm and, sure enough, it's just not quite able to slip on the ends of the cams. I then cut another pen section to 50mm, and it's perfect for the LH cylinder.

Now the dimensions on my bike are: RH OEM tool=44mm and pen insert=48mm. LH OEM tool=46mm and pen insert=50mm.

Maybe this has something to do with the slightly different length cam chains, as the RH chain only has 102 elements and LH chain has 106 elements.

Anyway, I'm still trying to find something that will create measured force instead of just duplicating the length of the tool on MY 2 cylinders of MY bike.

Thanks again for everyone that has contributed, and if you are waiting for a tensioning tool, I hope to find a solution soon.

Sorry if I've confused anyone with my first attempt to make something that works, but think there is interest for others to find a replacement.

 

RTW Cams.jpg

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  • 1 month later...
On 1/25/2019 at 9:00 PM, Boxflyer said:

Seems that several locations have been unable to ship the OEM Cam Timing Tension Tool for a couple of months now.

 

In an effort to come up with a solution, I have made a YouTube Video of a DIY replacement for BMW #83300444292. 

Hope this helps.

 

The revised YouTube video is back online.

 

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  • 2 months later...
21 hours ago, roadnwater said:

I have the Timing Chain Tension tool 83300444292 and Alignment Jig 83302327796 for sale.

I'm interested in the tools. I sent you a PM.

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