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Riding Posture

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Endobobdds

"STREET STRATEGIES: THE IMPORTANCE OF POSTURE"

MOA article by Jim Ford - most of us know this, however, nice article on one of the most important aspects of riding smoothly and safely!

Edited by Endobobdds

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TEWKS

I forgot if I asked, but how much adjusting did you have to do going from the K bike to new GSA? I'd imagine quite different starting point.

 

Pat

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Endobobdds
I forgot if I asked, but how much adjusting did you have to do going from the K bike to new GSA? I'd imagine quite different starting point.

 

Pat

 

I prefer the lean forward position on the K bike for aggressive, mountain and curvy roads. However, I found it easy to adjust to the more upright position on the GS and more than willing to give up that somewhat more comfortable position/comfort for the off road capabilities of the GSA. :thumbsup:

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LittleBriar
"STREET STRATEGIES: THE IMPORTANCE OF POSTURE"

MOA article by Jim Ford - most of us know this, however, nice article on one of the most important aspects of riding smoothly and safely!

I spent 3 days with Jim Ford this Spring learning how to ride in the Blue Ridge back roads. He emphasized posture and lane positioning for maximum visibility and safety. He's a great instructor and I left the a much better rider. Highly recommended.

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tallman

If you want to know proper posture, look at motorcycle sales ads.

:/

 

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Sonor

Reminds me of a book I picked up a long time ago. "The Upper Half of the Motorcycle"

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twistyguy

Thanks Bob. Good article.

 

I found this video on motorcycle posture one of the best I've seen.

He pinned my comment and video on Smoke Hole Rd at the bottom. Really excellent instruction video.

 

Peter

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Endobobdds
Thanks Bob. Good article.

I found this video on motorcycle posture one of the best I've seen.

He pinned my comment and video on Smoke Hole Rd at the bottom. Really excellent instruction video.

Peter

That is a very good video Peter - thanks for sharing! :thumbsup: The riding position reminds me of the central principle stressed in BMWST's east coast "RideSmart" course that I took many years ago: "kiss your inside mirror". :/

 

Sure wish for our newer members that the course would be once again taught every couple of years.

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Bernie
Thanks Bob. Good article.

 

I found this video on motorcycle posture one of the best I've seen.

He pinned my comment and video on Smoke Hole Rd at the bottom. Really excellent instruction video.

 

Peter

 

Great video and a terrific road, Peter.

Where did you mount the camera? What are your settings on your GoPro.

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twistyguy

Hi Bernie!

Smoke Hole Rd in WV is perhaps my favorite road. If you watch the video from the beginning, the road flollows a branch of the Potomac that carved out an incredible canyon. It's a spectacular road! It amazes me how few people know about it. It was gravel until about 10 years ago. I titled the video SH Ride because I don't want people to find out about this road!

This is the camera mount: MotoRadds Motorcycle Curved Chin... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FYWHHLY?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf. It's mounted just to the right of the chin with an arm that holds the camera in front of the chin. It's an excellent tool to make sure you're pointing your chin into the turn. I really like this mounting position—the body absorbs a lot of the bumps and holds the camera more still. And it's low on the helmet so it's shielded from buffeting when you are behind the windscreen and the sound of the bike sounds great from that position. It gives an interesting viewpoint where you can look at the gps/dash when you're not looking into the turn.

The camera is a cheapie: AKASO Brave 4. About $80 on Amazon although I bought it on a flash sale for $50. Settings were 1080 60 FPS with anti-shake. It does go to 4K supposedly. I should try it some time. The battery time on the camera is its weakness—only about 20 minutes per video. The actual video on my computer was great but when I transferred it to YouTube the quality went way down. It's a rendering issue.

Edited by twistyguy

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Endobobdds
I titled the video SH Ride because I don't want people to find out about this road!
Peter - good idea to refer to the road as "SH". It is also my favorite road in WV and not hardly known or used.

I started riding that road on my KRS when the last mile was gravel (16 years ago). :thumbsup:

 

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RandyShields

Very similar techniques to the Ride Smart approach taught for many years by a number of this site's members. I had the chance to take one of those first classes up on the Blue Ridge and Cherohala, and it definitely made me a better rider. Still practicing those concepts today.

 

Randy

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tallman

In 1980, Deal's Gap was little known, compared to early 90's.

 

What happened after that is sadly, history.

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marcopolo

Thanks for those videos, Peter, both the instructional one, and your ride on SH Road. Bob introduced me to the latter last Fall, on our way to FART, but it was raining/wet. I'd certainly like to try it again on dry roads (preferably without full cases). I certainly plan to try the foot placement technique shown in the first video, at least the part about the outside foot. I've been putting (or trying to put) the balls of my feet on the pegs.

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twistyguy
Posted (edited)

Mark—let's make a day trip to Smoke Hole in the Spring! Hopefully Bob and Barry could come along.

 

That foot placement pearl has made a huge difference in my cornering.

 

Do you notice your left heel hitting the center stand on the GS when you put your toes on the peg? It's kind of annoying. But I don't think there's an easy solution other than to keep your mid-foot on the peg.

Edited by twistyguy

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marcopolo
Mark—let's make a day trip to Smoke Hole in the Spring! Hopefully Bob and Barry could come along.

 

That foot placement pearl has made a huge difference in my cornering.

 

Do you notice your left heel hitting the center stand on the GS when you put your toes on the peg? It's kind of annoying. But I don't think there's an easy solution other than to keep your mid-foot on the peg.

 

Good idea on the ride, Peter. I haven't noticed my heel hitting the stand, but my feet are probably smaller than yours!

 

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twistyguy
On 1/6/2019 at 3:41 PM, marcopolo said:

 

Good idea on the ride, Peter. I haven't noticed my heel hitting the stand, but my feet are probably smaller than yours!

 

That center stand bouncing off my heel when my toes were on the pegs was just driving me nuts.  So I eliminated the problem!  I bought a Pitbull rear wheel single-sided stand to work on the bike in my garage--nice.  The only problem will be how to check the oil level on the road--I guess Marcpolo will have to hold the bike upright for me while I look at the glass!:3:

604C5081-1BED-4549-8ED0-196FC30CAE4D.jpeg

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Endobobdds

Peter - perhaps you should change your board name to "Big Foot".:classic_biggrin:

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marcopolo
On 3/12/2019 at 9:20 AM, twistyguy said:

That center stand bouncing off my heel when my toes were on the pegs was just driving me nuts.  So I eliminated the problem!  I bought a Pitbull rear wheel single-sided stand to work on the bike in my garage--nice.  The only problem will be how to check the oil level on the road--I guess Marcpolo will have to hold the bike upright for me while I look at the glass!:3:

 

 

Peter, when you said you eliminated the problem, I wondered if you had removed your foot.  Thanks for the clarification.  As for helping you check the oil, I've contracted that out to Bob.

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