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geemunay

Oil gauge slow to register level

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geemunay

Greetings riders,

 

I am getting used to my "new to me" 97 r1100rt with a questionable service history and 79k miles. My electronic oil gauge registers no oil or one bar when I start my bike?? after a few minutes of riding the gauge slowly rises to mid level.

 

Normal or no?

 

Cheers!! :wave:

 

 

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dirtrider
Greetings riders,

 

I am getting used to my "new to me" 97 r1100rt with a questionable service history and 79k miles. My electronic oil gauge registers no oil or one bar when I start my bike?? after a few minutes of riding the gauge slowly rises to mid level.

 

Normal or no?

 

Cheers!! :wave:

 

 

Evening geemunay

 

Are you referring to your oil TEMPERATURE gauge? If so it should start out low as there is no heat in the oil when first started then move up near mid range as the engine heats to operating temperature.

 

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geemunay

Well don't i feel dumb!

 

you are so right!!! I am still learning about this hog.

 

 

Thank you!

 

 

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tallman

Welcome.

 

You do know where to "see" your oil level, right?

Search "oil dance".

 

Also, keep the revs up to enjoy the boxer.

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geemunay

Yep, thank you. I found the view port last night , oil color looks ready for a change. I plan to change all fluids as soon as possible.

 

There is a lot more going on in this bike than my Honda haha

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tallman

Service is based on time/mileage.

 

Service schedules on line.

 

Color changes after short time, but, IMO, always good to establish known

baseline with unknown service history.

Fluids, filters, easy enough.

Valves, TBS, easy enough.

 

The 1100 is a competent ride with huge potential, enjoy.

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geemunay

Thanks bro, I am thrilled and terrified of my purchase so far haha. she has done really well so far and I need to keep reading about her.

 

I think I am able to change fluids and filter with the info online but I may run it to the dealer for valves and tbs.. may be over my head at this point by myself. I also want them to check the v belt and I may need new rear brake pads (never done pads before)

 

 

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AndyS

No, the servicing on this bike is WELL within the abilities of any owner. For the price of a service at a bike workshop, you could pretty much buy the tools you need. That is what these forums are for. Many of us have had and have these bikes. This particular forum is pretty much the best, but there are many others too.

When you are ready, just ask and if we can, we'll help.

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SAS

geemunay

 

Remember when changing oil filter make sure and check that the oil filter gasket does not stay up in the cavity after removing the filter. It has been a problem for some. For your first time just check and that way you know that someone else did not leave one in there. If someone else left one in there it would more than likely be leaving a mess on the floor after operation.

 

I like to use the K&N KN163, it has a drive nut on the filter for ease of installation and removal. Remember do not over tighten it. It makes it difficult to remove if over tight. The torque is 11 NM or 97 in lbs.

 

Edited by SAS

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Dave P

gee- first things I did when I bought my high mileage 96 RT (5 years ago) was oil & filter, transmission oil and final drive oil. Later I did the fuel filter and new SS brake lines with a complete brake fluid flush, and alternator belt. The old rubber brake lines get brittle and inefficient. Will be replacing the fuel lines inside the gas tank over this winter, should have done those when I did the fuel filter.

 

YOU can do all of this, including the valves. You might find someone on this forum in your area that can give you a hand with the TB sync. That's what I was able to do.

 

What color is your 97? Dave

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SAS
gee- first things I did when I bought my high mileage 96 RT (5 years ago) was oil & filter, transmission oil and final drive oil. Later I did the fuel filter and new SS brake lines with a complete brake fluid flush, and alternator belt. The old rubber brake lines get brittle and inefficient. Will be replacing the fuel lines inside the gas tank over this winter, should have done those when I did the fuel filter.

 

YOU can do all of this, including the valves. You might find someone on this forum in your area that can give you a hand with the TB sync. That's what I was able to do.

 

What color is your 97? Dave

 

I think we need to ease him into it first. A little at a time. We don't want to get him discouraged. As you said all good things to do, but let him get used to the bike first, especially when it comes to the touchy Throttle Body Sync.

 

Also sound advice about finding someone in his area to help him get things going.

 

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geemunay

I agree with the biting off more than I can chew. I will start small and progress with her.

 

Dave- my girl has a chemelion pearl, so she is green, purple, and blue. I'm finding all of the extras that were done to her. I.e. Custom paint, top case 33l, accessory shelf and a few other things. It had a headlight protector and tank bag that has managed to be removed before I bought her.

 

Got my first torque wrench today!! And lots of metric attachments

 

I am looking for a mentor and/or to host a tech day to learn more

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Dave P

gee- yeah you're right, sorry for the big list. We have long cold winters up here which are no good for riding but excellent for catching up on repairs and service. If it's running nice, I'd wait on fiddling with the valves and TBs for a little while and put some miles on her. I would do the fluids though. Make sure your brakes are working properly too.

 

You might investigate and see if there is a BMW motorcycle club in your area. That would be a great way to find folks to give you a hand / advice with service, and folks to ride with too. Dave

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geemunay

Dave- I really appreciate the list honestly. I can budget for parts, and read up on the work.

 

The dealer left me with the impression that they use "special tools" to sync the TBS. But he may be blowing smoke up my butt so i will give him my money. The previous owner said it was probably overdue for a solid look over. Dealer quoted 1100$ to do valves and look it over.. anything they find is extra$$$. Dealer is also three hours from me...

 

I'm looking into clubs. Bummed that I missed the ride in silver city that just finished.

 

-Gregory

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dirtrider

 

The dealer left me with the impression that they use "special tools" to sync the TBS. But he may be blowing smoke up my butt so i will give him my money. The previous owner said it was probably overdue for a solid look over. Dealer quoted 1100$ to do valves and look it over.. anything they find is extra$$$. Dealer is also three hours from me...

 

I'm looking into clubs. Bummed that I missed the ride in silver city that just finished.

 

-Gregory

 

Afternoon Gregory

 

The dealer does use special tools & equipment but in most cases there is a good home type work-around tool or device that will work as well or even better than the BMW special tools.

 

On the TB sync-- a homemade H2o manometer is actually more sensitive & accurate than the dealer tool. More finicky to use a homemade manometer but the homemade manometer is super accurate & precise.

 

 

zOoNM1y.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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Dave P

Gee- Well I'm no mechanic genius, just have wrenched on every bike or car I've owned since about 1980. Look up Beemer Boneyard. They are a good resource. they sell a valve setting set that includes 2 intake feelers and 2 exhaust feelers (since it is 4 valve per side, you have to do both intakes, both exhausts at the same time). As far as the TB sync, they guy that helped me used a Twinmax and he got them dialed in pretty quick. About 5 minutes I think.

 

My RT is at 120K miles, I've owned it for 5 years, and have only hired out tire changes (3 times). Everything else I've done myself, including a repaint. $1100 plus extras? you could almost buy another RT for that price!! I'd rather spend that money on tools and beer. Dave

Edited by Dave P

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PatML

+1 on doing it yourself. The valves really are that easy, even for a muppet like me, and the beauty is that you can take as long as you like to get all four feeler guages sliding with just the same friction on both sides, which seems to make a difference. A dealer might get them in spec but not quite perfect. Even your first time with all the checking and uncertainty will be quicker than your 6-hour round trip. I use a Twinmax to balance the throttle bodies. It's good. And your heart swells with pride when she is a smoother ride afterwards and you did it all yourself.

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Jim Moore

Talk to Jim VonBaden over on the Advrider forum. He sells a CD that shows how to do everything.

 

The dealer may have a special tool to synch the throttle bodies, but you can buy one for $100 or make one for $10 that will work just as good.

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geemunay

Mind blown. Just watched a video of the homemade tool to check tbs ( done by motofrog on you tube) very interesting, and doesn't seem all that daunting. I can definitely make that gauge.

 

I paid 1800 for the bike, so yeah, I'm with you on saving haha

 

Thanks for the encouragement y'all

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tallman

When you're done, double check the R side cable for proper routing.

Don't put tupperware back on until double check all work (BTDT :P )

Some make a diagram of bike on cardboard, then put fasteners in that

corresponding to placement on bike for ease on reassembly.

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