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Twisties

Tires....

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Twisties

Sporty performance desired, reasonable lifetime... the typical sport touring tire....

 

We've been stuck in Michelin since the PR2s. Run a bunch of 2's, 3's, 4's, and 4GT's. I like the performance, but not the price... and frankly, we get 6-8k miles from all of them and have not noticed any change in durability over the years of claimed improvements. Had one set of Bridgestones in there.... maybe 023's, didn't like them... Before the string of Michelins we had run Dunlop, Metzeler, Avon, Conti, Bridgestone.

 

It's time to try some other brands.... but the bewildering array of choices is driving me crazy. Which would be the typical sport touring choices in Metzeler, Conti, Dunlop and Pirelli? It looks like Avon no longer has an entry. The Shinko Verge is priced nice, real nice, but reviews are sparse and not inspiring. These are the ones I think might be what I'm looking for:

 

Dunlop Roadsmart III?

Pirelli Angel GT?

Metzeler Sportec M7?

Conti Road Attack III?

 

 

 

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Puddles

I'm no expert, but I know a guy who plays one on TV, and he recommended Angel GT's. So I got some and have had them on for about a month. So far they are great and show hardly any wear after 1000 mi. Bike seems nicely balanced and turns in quick. I'm noticing a bit of scuff way out on the chicken strip too :revit:

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Twisties
I'm noticing a bit of scuff way out on the chicken strip too :revit:

 

Can't imagine how that happened! :-)

 

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Puddles
Can't imagine how that happened! :-)

 

I'm *trying* to have fun but the idea of scuffing all that plastic is definitely keeping my speed down a bit.

 

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Hank in WV

While I don't have any experience with the Verge, I did have a couple of sets of Shinko 009's on my old 2000 RT. I usually get between 5500 and 7000 miles on tires and these were no different. They seemed to handle very well for this 71 year old. I ride fairly briskly on our windy roads.

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Jerry Duke

Buy the stickiest tire for the type of riding you do. Tires are cheap.

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Exploreinman

When you think about the fact that you're riding around on two small contact patches of rubber, I don't understand the rational of saving a few bucks on tires. Buy the best you can afford for the type of riding you do. I'll sacrifice mileage for a tire that performs better. Tires are cheap when you think about what you're trusting them to do!

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Bill_Walker

I picked up a set of Dunlop RS3s on the way to Weaverville, and I was very happy with them throughout the trip (previously had PR4GTs on the bike). They seemed to work as well as any of the various PRxs I've ridden. Maybe a little faster turn-in. I can't speak to longevity, of course, with only 2000 miles on them.

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Twisties

In my sizes 180/55 ZR 17 and 120/70 ZR 17 for a pair:

 

Dunlop Roadsmart III $298.11 and you get a $75 Mastercard. Net = $223.11

 

Pirelli Angel GT $311.98 and you get a $50 VISA. Net $261.98

 

Avon Spirit ST $240.64

 

Conti RoadAttack III $293.63

 

Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT $349.76

 

Michelin Road 5 $335.76

 

Shinko Verge 2x 016 (or 011 are almost the same if you prefer single compound) $205.76

 

Bridgestone T31 or T31 GT $311.04

 

Metzeler RoadTec 01 $333.98

 

Reviews:

 

I was looking at the Avons, especially as I read they are a small British independent.... always a leg up for something like that. A lot of press rode them at a track and street ride Avon put on, and reviews I saw were consistent. These seem to be a competent tire with the only question being some squirming under hard track turning on heavier bikes. Reviewers dismissed this as not relevant to sport touring. I couldn't find many user reviews.

 

Dunlop was also intriguing. They have a very data-based marketing campaign, with testing purporting to show out performance of the Michelins, especially as miles pile on. Also, they claim a longer lasting tire. Ride reviews are favorable. I had pulled my Roadmsarts and Roadsmart II's because I didn't like them at 4-5k miles. It seems Dunlop recognized the problem and are targeting their marketing at showing improvement.

 

The Pirelli's are also getting great reviews, and I've never had Pirellis.

 

That's about all I had time for... Looks like the Dunlops will get a go, with their rebate price being the final factor to close the deal.

 

 

Edited by Twisties

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mrzoom

Jan,Dunlops RS III on the RT now and I really like them. I just picked up another set as the price is right. I'm going to try to run the set that went to

the UN to get me over and back to FART. That should be bout 5,000 miles total and that is pushing it for me. I've never gotten over 6,000 miles

on any tyre from anyone. Just me I guess. :dopeslap::wave:

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chrisolson

Jan ...

 

Buy the stickiest tire for the type of riding you do. Tires are cheap.

What he ^^ said . Forget the Touring go for the Sport :grin:

 

https://www.pirelli.com/tyres/en-ww/motorcycle/all-tyres/sheet/diablo-rosso-2

 

$233.70 on Amazon

 

https://www.amazon.com/Pirelli-DIABLO-ROSSO-Street-Motorcycle/dp/B014MRUX0I

 

 

 

Edited by chrisolson

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tallman
Can't imagine how that happened! :-)

 

I'm *trying* to have fun but the idea of scuffing all that plastic is definitely keeping my speed down a bit.

 

 

Using RideSmart and MYRP one can go extremely fast (not on public roads) and

never come close to scuffing any plastic.

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RPG

I changed a set of Dunlop Roadsmart's on my buddy's K1300GT. He hated them, wore out in 5k and started cupping after 2k. We mounted a set of new Michelin Pilot Road 5's. His last set of Pilot 4's lasted over 12k.

 

I've got a set of Road 4's on my R1150RT, currently showing 14k and starting to get thin, so will probably get another set. I don't see the Road 5's in a 170/60-17 rear tire size yet. :(

 

RPG

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Lone_RT_rider
Can't imagine how that happened! :-)

 

I'm *trying* to have fun but the idea of scuffing all that plastic is definitely keeping my speed down a bit.

 

 

Using RideSmart and MYRP one can go extremely fast (not on public roads) and

never come close to scuffing any plastic.

 

Bingo.... even with a Harley-Davidson. YMMV.

 

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NoelCP

I have 35.3K miles on a '16 RT and have used PR4GT, Angel GT, and now Conti RoadAttack 3. The RA3 is far and away the best tire so far, and if I include Metz Z8 on the prior F800GT, RA3 is far and away the best of the bunch in terms of: lack of road noise or howling, grip, turn-in, and along w/ turn-in which was way too easy on Angel GT the RA3 will hold a line in spirited riding best by far of the bunch. As well these tires don't have a hint of scalloping when running at standard pressure in the front, which as you may know PR4GT is known for this issue and the remedy for them is to give up a little contact patch and run them at 40 on the front. Even though I only have 5,300m on the RA3 they are holding their shape very well despite about 3.3K miles of pretty straight roads on a recent trip into the Canadian Rockies. I believe these may well outlast the others as well though it's a bit early to be certain.

 

Conti does not use multiple compounds in this tire and their method to address the same issue multi compound does I think is contributing to how well they hold their nice shape. Angle GT developed 5 discreet planes of wear which I believe made the overly easy turn-in get worse over time. It took me a good 500m to get used to them after PR4GT. Here is the Angel GT at about 6.5K miles:

 

Screen_Shot_2018-05-12_at_6.51.23_AM.jpg

 

While this is only at 5.3K miles, here is the front on the Conti RA3:

 

IMG_2902.jpg

 

I rate this tire as the benchmark for tire perfection for the bike it's on. ;o)

 

 

 

 

Edited by NoelCP

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Twisties

Nice! I will have to try Conti's after the Dunlops.

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joeb

Looking at ra3 tires on americanmototire site. It appears yours have a different tread pattern to the on line site. Same tire ??

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elkroeger

Get whatever's on sale. :whistle:

Edited by elkroeger

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Michaelr11
Looking at ra3 tires on americanmototire site. It appears yours have a different tread pattern to the on line site. Same tire ??

 

I think the american moto tire site has some screwed up photos. I would go by the tire model and either ignore the photo of make an inquiry before ordering.

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FlyingFinn

Just as a somewhat anecdotal reference point, on the big GS, I'm currently sold on Pirelli tires.

My previous faw were Michelins (not the awful Anakee 3) but currently Pirelli is seems to be making some really great tires.

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Dave_in_TX
Just as a somewhat anecdotal reference point, on the big GS, I'm currently sold on Pirelli tires.

My previous faw were Michelins (not the awful Anakee 3) but currently Pirelli is seems to be making some really great tires.

Just as a somewhat anecdotal reference point, on the big GS, I'm currently sold on Pirelli tires.

My previous faw were Michelins (not the awful Anakee 3) but currently Pirelli is seems to be making some really great tires.

 

 

I'm also a fan of Pirellis.I've had several sets on my '14 GS and can lean it over far enough to eliminate the "chicken strips" on the rear tire. I also get good mileage. The curent rear tire has about 10k miles on it and it hasn't reached he wear bars.

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Bill_Walker

One other note on the Roadsmart IIIs: last week, I took a ride on CA-79 south from Julian. I discovered there was a repaving project going on, and they had scraped off the asphalt, leaving a grooved surface. I was surprised and pleased to discover that the grooves were completely unnoticeable on the RS3s. My buddy rode it this week on his Bonneville T-100 Black, on whatever tires are OEM on that, and he said they were squirming all over the place.

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sardineone

Awwwww,, that's better! :dance:

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Bernie

 

Thank you for sharing the article.

The interesting thing is, that they only included only one Heavy Duty (GT) version from one manufacturer.

The Conti RoadAttack is the only GT tire, and it has the longest tread life of all 6 tires tested.

The Dunlop is only available in one version and the Michelin Pilot Road 5 is not rated for the bike. The Metzler Roadtec 01 is the standard version not the HWM version.

Even though I really like the magazine and believe they do a great job with the tire comparisons, this test is of little value for owners of BMW R1200RT or K1600GT, etc.

I don't think that they are doing a real apples to apples comparison test. But it is useful information for lighter bikes, like maybe F800's.

Edited by Bernie

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realshelby

I have never read a magazine article on motorcycle tires that has any real world value to a rider like me.

 

I don't think you can buy a really bad tire today.

 

Mileage predictions based on a 1500 mile test are not worth the time to write them.

 

Wet traction? If you read into what is written about that, wet traction must certainly now be better than dry traction! I am sure some tires are better than others, especially in cold and wet conditions. But I especially like reviews where comments are "Michelin PR4's are the best in wet traction" and so on. Best? Does that mean it slides less? Does that mean you have tried ANY other tire in similar conditions? Wet riding is a small percentage of my riding time. I ride much more careful in the rain, no matter how confident I am in my tires.

 

Give me good grip in all conditions, and about twice the tread life I am getting now please!

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Bernie

Yes I can see that. Since most tires don't last longer than 5,000 miles, a test of 3,600 km is really worth less.

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Twisties

Mounted the Dunlop RS III's and got out for a short wear-in ride. I am happy to report that initial impression is excellent, with performance on par with the Michelin PR4 GT's in all respects under dry conditions. Grip, handling, noise and comfort are all top of the line. 36 psi f, 42 psi rear. The only thing of note is that the rear took the maximum 3 oz. of weights to balance, however, this did not result in any noticeable issues in ride.

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RecentConvert

That seems like a lot of weight for a tire rated for 168 mph. Did whoever mounted the tire match the yellow dot to the valve stem?

 

"The yellow dots should be aligned with the valve stem on both steel and aluminum wheels since this is the wheel's heavy balance point. This will help minimize the amount of weight needed to balance a tire and wheel assembly. So usually, whenever you see a yellow dot, match it up with the valve stem.Aug 13, 2007"

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dirtrider
That seems like a lot of weight for a tire rated for 168 mph. Did whoever mounted the tire match the yellow dot to the valve stem?

 

"The yellow dots should be aligned with the valve stem on both steel and aluminum wheels since this is the wheel's heavy balance point. This will help minimize the amount of weight needed to balance a tire and wheel assembly. So usually, whenever you see a yellow dot, match it up with the valve stem.Aug 13, 2007"

 

Afternoon RecentConvert

 

Are you sure that BMW still drills the valve stem hole at the heavy point? Most manufactures haven't done that extra labor/ extra cost operation a long time now as a big cost saver as well as it isn't that effective with wheels using in-wheel pressure sensors.

 

With the introduction of in-wheel sensors there is no way to know where the heavy or light spot on the wheel is until the sensors are mounted & no way will any manufacture machine an alloy wheel, mount wheel sensors, re-mount on machine, then re-spin it for valve stem placement.

 

 

 

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RecentConvert

Dirtrider,

 

I can't speak specifically to BWM, but the yellow dots are a tire industry standard for supplying OE tires. I've found when the local guy didn't put the yellow dot by the valve stem, the tire required significantly more weight to balance.

 

We've also balanced the wheel and sensor without a tire and found once the wheel assembly was balanced, the tires required very little weight.

 

I worked for Goodyear Corporate for a number of years, Goodyear and Sumitomo have a strategic agreement regarding the Dunlop brand. Roadsmart 3 in the USA is manufactured by Sumitomo in Japan, Roadsmart 3 in Europe is manufactured in a Goodyear owned plant in Europe.

 

Three ounces is a lot of irregularity in a performance tire like we all use, if I had to use that much, I would be contacting the seller for a replacement.

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greiffster

FWIW, I checked the balance on both rims of my '08 GSA and former '03 RT, with regular rubber valve stems installed (no tires). I saw no correlation between the heavy spot of the rim and the location of the valve stem.

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RPG

as I mount and balance my own tires, I agree that the rims (at least on my 04 RT) does not equate with the valve stem being the heaviest part of the rim. Accordingly, I'll mount my new Roadsmart III's yellow dot on the actual heavy spot.

 

thanks,

 

RPG

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