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Motorcycle Camping?

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BigTup

Predictive typing...I meant Petzel!

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elkroeger
Predictive typing...I meant Petzel!

 

 

Nice try. But too late. We're all carrying pretzels now. Pretzels and scotch.

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JohnnyJ

Sorry if these are already mentioned. Some are a little obscure, but I found to be very handy.

Tool kit - Minimum to access battery to jump start, and fuses.

SPARE KEY - Hidden but accessible.

Wash clothes and Baby wipes. Athletes foot lotion.

Clean underwear and socks for each day.

Good fitting Rubber Sandals - For around the camp site, or when hiking and expecting river / creek crossings.

Red Light flashlight or light stick - To preserve night vision, and not disturb nearby people.

Safety Pins - Good for hanging stuff up to dry when windy. Surprisingly handy for other uses.

Duct Tape rolled onto a pencil (space saving)

Journal - To make notes on how to improve the next trip, track costs, draw or sketch (if that's your thing), log your adventure. I try to make entries nightly.

Collapsible ice chest for the adult beverages you might come across.

Good Book!

 

Johnny J

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Bud
Predictive typing...I meant Petzel!

 

 

Nice try. But too late. We're all carrying pretzels now. Pretzels and scotch.

 

Always wondered what I needed but didn't have, now I know. Pretzels!!! :clap:

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powwow

I bought the big agnes insulated air pad and stunned by how well though work.

 

https://www.bigagnes.com/Insulated-Air-Core-Ultra

 

 

I'm sold on those as well. I have an Exped down mat and they are wonderfully comfortable. In addition to having insulation value, they're also very lightweight and pack down to the size of a Nalgene bottle. They're great for winter ski mountaineering! The Exped comes with an ingenious inflation system called the Schnozzle Pumpbag. It's basically a large nylon bag with a valve that connects to the mat. Open the bag to fill it with air, then close the top and squeeze the air out through the valve and into the mat. Usually takes about four cycles to fill the mat.

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Smoky

I also have that BA air mattress, and it's a great product.

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Lowndes

I have several of the Thermarest mattresses that I've used for years camping in the US and Canada. Several years ago I bought 2 each of these cots on fleabay and they are MUCH better than any pad on the ground. The ground is always lumpy (unless you're on sand), whether you're on deep moss in Ontario or a wood platform in the Okefenokee or an apple orchard somewhere on the BRP. And my experience is that Thermarests can't smooth or move the lumps. Both of these type cots have enough ground clearance and "give" in the fabric deck to keep you off the ground and comfortable whichever way you turn during the night. They also provide airflow underneath you in hot weather. A Thermarest can be added for insulation in cold weather.

 

The big difference between these two cots is the number of parts to assemble. The fabric "deck" and side rails for both are basically the same. But, the round leg cot on the left has six "legs" and each leg has 6 individual parts = 36 pieces. The T leg cot on the right has 5 legs, 4 pieces each = 20. Much faster and easier to set up and take down.

 

The T leg cot is slightly bulkier to pack and weighs a few ounces more, but it's worth it to me. And neither setup themselves like a Thermarest: unwrap it and walk away. But I'll pay that price for the comfort. I found 27-30 inch wide (760mm) versions of both on fleabay which are much better than 23-24" standard width. Extra leg parts can be bought for replacements or added for more support if you're 200 lbs or more.

 

More specs on both here: Round leg and T leg Cot specs

 

HLSeLM69FL6G_4KR_bnkhab_LDMtEidg6d-etb5myaEQW3Kog1fDubmJDNVWffenVtl0SnAkCQlKJxdmOQmO0KzSYUj4lP57xJC1athoLPZF8wv4OnB1Odb0lhlRTxKn0aVGllTvrZuZRCinXu_mA7UadhAzaN5_bDXlJhkngSqOMTicz8WbctifDEXYPLCNdbBYLTL5x8Jy9xcWG8jYYrg_kwylTdYdvQq7SA5UtXKH6QDMyajv65j2P39b_2yK2tyAG4YmkPm56tfD-3rifo2IQ2Ugp0iB5m8gGAARx6g0MDimeErlCF5uL-tznK30olMOvwR_EkDtdJQdMqLBiwLGcnVcAD0NT4lZpo6-JXsNqPArE264ohawyE0XKYQDK2rukhHK_FljvMjQ7xsSgMCy0iazWhoAFMozxTiGecwR3f3yjeaXkeF0KDHUC2ZpHKStSBZNtP5gyHK5xtMNJqClR23sdqCTXCkbdGhBtYsFHSOadyb-i6EYnSomFefPIwKs85a9QC78LyIQHipprNe8x2PvU6xLUXdhPXEL0IdPkLHylPr6tDo3yndqyszEGi3sZCeqhednlNekIm9sbG4wP1iVeZG-t9ZF3s4LplwE3BGKCcUFqo9XEHb1e6c6lzazc9NmaziOXpL8clZcXn2OpHEKu3fO=w450-h351-no?.jpg

Edited by Lowndes

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Bud

I'm a rather large guy. A while back I found a used one of THESE Outrageously expensive new. Don't show up used very often.

 

 

Easy to set up and take down, along with a Big Agnes mattress and a down bag, I'm good to go.

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BigTup

I had a Big Agnes, don't remember which one, but it was a pain in the butt to blow up. the air would not flow through the chambers. It was especially difficult to deflate. Plus I kept hitting the ground even if I really tried to fill it up with air. I bought a Sea to Summit. I got the best one, insulated, and with 2 separate layers to blow up, sort of a top and bottom. It's fantastic, blows up quick, deflates immediately, and I don't hit the ground.

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Antimatter

For those who like the cots - do they work well for someone who sleeps on their side? I'm curious as I would like to dabble in motorcycle camping to save a bit of $$$ and avoid the wrath of She Who Must Be Obeyed.

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Rob Nowell

RULE ONE: Get early starts!

RULE TWO: Take in all the hydration today for what you'll need tomorrow.

TENT: Aluminum stakes; 2-3 man is PLENTY large enough. My new one is a one-man backpacking tent, lightweight and compact; also waterproof or water resistang.

BED: Air. Klymit V is my new one; once again, lightweight and compact.

BAG: Be prepared for cold, meaning down to +10 degrees?

FOOD: I agree with suggestion to snack at camp.

SAFETY: I've never had problems. I really like the KOA campgrounds, as they have showers, C-stores, and even small cabins if you find inclimate weather.

OTHER: I'm a bit anal, so I prefer to have an itinerary set up in advance. This way, I always know I won't be screwed if campgrounds/hotels are booked when I'm getting tired. My friends call me a wimp for this, but "I'm not the one who had to put in another 120 miles because Carpinteria State Beach Campground was full!"

OTHER: Stop more often than just for fuel: just a gatorade or water, or a stretch and take a leak.

OTHER: I also recently purchased a pair of auxiliarry fuel bottles. They're only 1L each, but it's better than nothing. I might advise taking a 1-gal bottle.

OTHER: Take a can of Plexus and a quality microfiber cloth for cleaning your windshield.

 

Edited by Rob Nowell

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LittleBriar
For those who like the cots - do they work well for someone who sleeps on their side? I'm curious as I would like to dabble in motorcycle camping to save a bit of $$$ and avoid the wrath of She Who Must Be Obeyed.

I have a thermarest and like to sleep on my side. No problem.

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Whip

For the record I have done many cross country riding trips in all kinds of weather and several 1000 mile days always staying in hotel/motels.

 

 

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Whip

I have ordered a two man backpacking tent, a sleeping bag,(one of my suppliers sells them) and I already have a foam mat.

 

Before I take a several day ride I am gonna check out some campgrounds in central Colorado and see how it goes.

 

The KOA in Ouray is my first choice.

 

I have not figured out the dinner thing yet so I may wing it on the first test ride/camp.

 

 

 

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realshelby

Whip, going out on a short excursion or two is worth its weight in gold! What everyone else likes might not be right for you, such as how big a tent you want or type of sleeping mat/mattress. You'll figure it out quickly.

 

Still hard to beat a bed in a motel at 7 pm after being on the road all day!

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Lowndes
For those who like the cots - do they work well for someone who sleeps on their side? I'm curious as I would like to dabble in motorcycle camping to save a bit of $$$ and avoid the wrath of She Who Must Be Obeyed.

 

LittleBriar,

 

YES, the cots work very well for sleeping on your side. I sleep on my side about 50% of the time and the cots are MUCH better than the Thermarest. My hip and shoulder do not touch the ground when on my side on the cot.

 

Side note: I found that some small to medium cell inflated poly "airbag" type packing material (the kind kids love to pop) makes a very good camping pillow when inside in a T-shirt. Much better than clothes or the inflatable type. It's very comfortable, you can adjust the loft easily, contour it however you want, experiment with different lofts, etc. Inexpensive, too. I found that stacked layers work much better than a wad. Doesn't weigh much, either. After the last night, I toss it to save space. Makes good insulation for cold brews on the ride into camp, too.

 

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lawnchairboy

That KOA is nice.

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JohnnyJ

One of my favorite ways to eat when travelling long distances is to simply go to the grocery store. Modern day grocery stores are like serve yourself restaurants with the deli sections, salad bars, soup bars and large selections of already cooked food items. You are rarely far from one. It also gives me a chance to walk around. After spending hours sitting on a motorcycle the last thing I want to do is sit in a restaurant booth waiting for a server, then waiting for the food, then waiting for the bill. Another perk: no tip required.

 

Johnny J

 

 

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Bud
For those who like the cots - do they work well for someone who sleeps on their side? I'm curious as I would like to dabble in motorcycle camping to save a bit of $$$ and avoid the wrath of She Who Must Be Obeyed.

 

Depends on the cot. Some are so low to the ground that side sleepers can end up on the ground.

 

try before you buy

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powwow
For those who like the cots - do they work well for someone who sleeps on their side? I'm curious as I would like to dabble in motorcycle camping to save a bit of $$$ and avoid the wrath of She Who Must Be Obeyed.

 

Yes, they work fine for side sleepers like me. I have an ALPS Mountaineering cot and it hits the sweet spot for me in terms of low enough to provide head room in my Big Agnes Copper Spur two man tent, but high enough not to touch the ground when I lay on my side. It's really a function of cot design and your personal weight. I'm 5'8" and 155 lbs, to the ALPS works great for me...it also packs reasonably small for packing on the moto.

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powwow
RULE ONE: Get early starts!

RULE TWO: Take in all the hydration today for what you'll need tomorrow.

TENT: Aluminum stakes; 2-3 man is PLENTY large enough. My new one is a one-man backpacking tent, lightweight and compact; also waterproof or water resistang.

BED: Air. Klymit V is my new one; once again, lightweight and compact.

BAG: Be prepared for cold, meaning down to +10 degrees?

FOOD: I agree with suggestion to snack at camp.

SAFETY: I've never had problems. I really like the KOA campgrounds, as they have showers, C-stores, and even small cabins if you find inclimate weather.

OTHER: I'm a bit anal, so I prefer to have an itinerary set up in advance. This way, I always know I won't be screwed if campgrounds/hotels are booked when I'm getting tired. My friends call me a wimp for this, but "I'm not the one who had to put in another 120 miles because Carpinteria State Beach Campground was full!"

OTHER: Stop more often than just for fuel: just a gatorade or water, or a stretch and take a leak.

OTHER: I also recently purchased a pair of auxiliarry fuel bottles. They're only 1L each, but it's better than nothing. I might advise taking a 1-gal bottle.

OTHER: Take a can of Plexus and a quality microfiber cloth for cleaning your windshield.

 

This is a great list...I'd like to add one more OTHER:

 

OTHER: Baby wipes...they're great for a "bath" in your tent prior to putting on those fresh undies and t-shirt.

 

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elkroeger

There are several suggestions for stoves. Many of the suggestions are great. But... One thing I do, is bring a stove that can use the same fuel that I put in the bike. This serves two purposes: 1) I don't have to worry about carrying enough fuel for the stove. Many stoves use canned propane, isobutane, etc. And you always have a partial can from the last trip. Then you have to estimate how many cans you need. If you run out, you have to look for a sporting goods store, and some types of fuel are easier to find than others. And 2) I always have a spare quart or so of gasoline handy for the bike, if I screw up and need more. I'll admit to using it for this once, while travelling with my wife. Her bike has a different range, and no gas gauge, and we accidentally ran it a little too close one time.

 

Oh, yeah. Baby wipes. Definitely baby wipes.

Edited by elkroeger

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Emfour

Best way to travel solo. Think backpacking gear. Water and peanut butter are your friends. Any bike is a touring bike with enough bungees.

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Whip

What kinda lighting works best?

 

Something that will stand up on it's own or should it strap to my forehead?

 

 

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powwow
What kinda lighting works best?

 

Something that will stand up on it's own or should it strap to my forehead?

 

 

I would recommend at minimum a headlamp. I also carry a small camping lantern from Black Diamond, which is convenient for lighting up the camp site or hanging in my tent:

 

https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/headlamps-and-lanterns/voyager-BD620709_cfg.html#cgid=lighting&start=14

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elkroeger

Get an old fashioned wax candle lantern. You just have not lived, until you've spilled hot wax all over the inside of your tent!

 

Headlamps are the best way to go. Black Diamond and Petzl are top choices, but many offerings, even at the local hardware store, can be quite good.

 

I've got a Petzl zipka that has kindof a spring loaded string for a strap. Extremely compact, and a wonderful improvement over typical straps.

 

https://www.petzl.com/US/en/Sport/CLASSIC-headlamps/ZIPKA

Edited by elkroeger

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dirtrider
What kinda lighting works best?

 

Something that will stand up on it's own or should it strap to my forehead?

 

 

Morning Whip

 

Yes, & yes.

 

I usually carry an, adjustable tilt, forehead mounting, multi-intensity light (an expensive one).

 

Also carry a 2 position brightness LED SMALL tent light (basically a small multi LED small space work light). Mine is about the size of a good sized cigarette pack.

 

I also carry a very small LED single battery pocket flashlight.

 

The 2 position brightness LED SMALL tent light is great to leave on low when you leave your tent for a bit as you can easily find the tent again plus the tent is then lit inside to see as you re-enter. It is also good to brighten the tent inside as you get ready for bed. I usually hang my tent light up high in the center of the tent as it REALLY lights up the entire inside.

 

The forehead light is great for working around outside the tent in the dark, or loading the bike in the dark, or just walking around at night with things in your hands (like beer & pretzels). The forehead light is also great for working on your bike or repairing a tire at night, etc.

 

The small LED flashlight is good as you ALWAYS have it with you if you start out away from your campsite in the daylight, like at a somewhat remote camp fire, or at a remote dinner, but don't have your forehead light with you (this seems to happen a lot with me). PLUS, the small LED flashlight is great for roaming around the campsite at night (like visit the rest room or ????. A forehead light used very late at night flashes on others tents (very bad form), a small pocket flashlight can have most of the light blocked with your fingers to allow only enough light to see a couple of feet in front of you but unblocked quickly if you need to see farther.

 

 

 

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Rider1200RT

Baby wipes are a must have, but make sure they are unscented!! You'll find the fragrances used may cause a rash or two in some spots after building up a sweat storm in your riding gear all day.... :whistle:

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Tasker
I have never camped off my bike (or anywhere else).

 

I want to ride across the country this summer camping along the way.

 

What kinda tent works best?

 

What kinda food should I carry?

 

Sleeping bag?

 

Air mattress or foam pad.

 

Is there a website that lists all the places you can camp and which ones have showers, bathrooms etc.

 

Is it too rude to arrive late in the evening and set up?

 

How safe is camping?

 

TIA

 

 

 

If your trip routes you through Indy, you are welcome to camp in my backyard. My neighbors are very old and are in bed by 4p, after dinner at 3p. It won't matter what time you arrive. I already have a garden hose in the backyard so your drinking water is plentiful. Our irrigation system runs on Monday, Wednesday and Friday so if you can schedule your arrival and departure accordingly, you will have a shower running in different parts of the yard for about an hour. Just the sound of running water will offer you the joy of living on the ocean without the expense or having to listen to those pesky windmills. There are plenty of trees to accommodate your hammock. If you need fire for cooking or just warm ambience, my neighbor has a fire pit. He's in bed by 4p so he won't know that you used it. There are no fees for camping but I do ask that you feed the red fox, deer and the wolf that cruises through most evenings. We look forward to your stay and reservations are not required.

 

 

 

Edited by Tasker

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Puddles

If you're coming as far as California, speak up. We'll put up with you for a night or two. PUT YOU UP I mean ;)

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Red

KOA's are consistently clean and safe with showers and most time they have laundry facilities. I will also say most are no longer cheap. I pulled into one in Pendleton, OR a couple years back. They wanted $45. A block away was a Motel 6. At that time with a 10% senior discount it cost $52. For 7 bucks I'll opt for a bed and air conditioning any day. In camp grounds you get to meet and talk with other campers usually, which for me is part of the pleasure to travel.

REI.com is a good source for bike appropriate camping gear.

I use a 2 person tub type tent with ground cloth and rain fly.

I don't cook as it requires a lot of gear and many food items don't travel well in hot side cases. Some use dehydrated food and it's not so bad. I go grocery shopping for enough fresh fruit and veg for that evening and next AM. Most food items are still wholesome in the AM even w/o refrigeration. EXCEPTION being if you are in bear country - never leave food out or in your tent. Leaving food outside is asking for trouble by other nocturnal beasties. I travel armed in the States. You do not need a carry permit if the firearm is in your tent as it is your domicile. Firearms are prohibited in Canada. Bear spray works on everything with eyeballs and a nose.

I used a succession of Thermarest pads until the thickest still wasn't adequate for my old bones. Now I use an EXped inflatable mattress. It packs into an extremely small package and has better than a 2 inch loft. My clever and talented spousal unit has sewn a bed sheet so that the mattress slips inside. Keeps my oily skin off the mattress and is less 'sticky' when it's really hot/humid.

It's never too late to set up camp. It's much easier with daylight and shining a bright light in or near your neighbors is rude. I don't know why some folk think they need 300 lumens to find the toilet at night? An adjustable low lumen or dimable or red light head lamp works all right.

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tallman

Okay, first we camped.

So everything was for two.

And I carried it all in bags or Upak, with a passenger.

Only strapped an additional bag on topcase for ez access to rain gear and a place to store it if wet (Helen 2W mesh bag).

Lot's of good stuff.

Didn't see clothes line and pins. We carry yellow nylon rope with clip. Hang up wet stuff like your microfiber camp towels bathing suits etc.

We pack our stuff in various bags. For example, our stove is a Coleman dual fuel (camp stove fuel or gasoline). We carry it in a small padded lunch box lined with insulation foam that pads the contents.

We put other stove/cooking stuff in another bag like that. We carry oatmeal/nuts/trail mix for breakfast. I buy bread/cheese/etc to make no cook evening meals at camp from local stores.

We carry dehydrated meals as options, also sometimes do the eat before camping meal and then light stuff like jerky later.

The freedom you have allows many options unless weather or locale comes into play.

Since you are solo camping you have more room, but, plenty of others have said it, don't take what you don't need, keep it light.

We also carry silk sleeping bag liners (add' warmth) and silk turtle necks and gloves/socks. Very light, ez wash and dry. Bewtween these, bag liners, sleeping bags in the 40' range for summer.

Add silk items, wool cap, microfiber comforters, you'll be warm.

We also carry several camp pillows. They kind of fold/collapse into themself.

We use sling chairs. Combined they weigh less than one Kermit chair.

Ground cloths, rain flys are important. We carry both.

Big Agnes makes integrated sleep setups with bag/inflatable pad that are excellent.

Critters. Carry good bug repellent. Racoons are pests if encouraged, bandits all.

We use headlamps and a small LED lanter/flashlight combo. Works well in the mech gear loft in the tent.

You can store all kinds of stuff in those.

Spare keys. And one at home in overnight envelope just in case.

Early (quiet) rising and cooking breakfast is often rewarding. Early on the road means early arrival at next camp site.

Assess the neighbors and go from there. Most campers are outgoing and friendly.

There are ways to secure your important belongings. Be sensible.

Many have power. Decide how you want to charge electronics and keep all those cords separate.l

We use a packing approach that allows for wet/dry separation. No reason to be cold or wet.

We even carried a fan and cord when camping in our hot summers.

 

FWIW< not being able to ride no more we just got a small all aluminum 8x5x4 trailer I'm converting to air conditioned bedroom for "camping".

31" off road tires gives us plenty of clearance

Have a great time.

Hope to see you down the road.

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Rob Nowell

fragrances may also attract bears...

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