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realshelby

RT LED bulb conversions that werk.

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realshelby

I am not a smart man. Smart would have left well enough alone after attempting to install a "recommended" LED conversion bulb earlier this year ( Low Beam Bulb replacement thread ). That bulb overheated and became dim within minutes of operation. Realizing heat was an issue, and researching some more, I tried some other type LED conversion bulbs. The ones with the cooling fan built in I stayed away from. Too many reports of problems and in the sealed housing I wondered if they would cool well enough. There are bulbs out now with braided copper heat sinks. Simple. No fan or other moving parts. This braid pulls heat from the bulb base and air pulls that heat from the braid. Since I already had a hole in my twist on bulb cover, I knew having the braids extend through that should work. There is a LOT of air moving in that area when the RT is moving! I had issues with CanBus faults on a couple other bulbs. Here is one that I am running and quite satisfied with. I have quite a few miles on it now. On the first test, when I switched on the high beams, I would get a bulb error on the dash. Went out quickly or just as soon as I went back to low beam. That first ride is the ONLY time it done that. Maybe CanBus can learn? Anyway, the light output is much better than even the Osram Nightbreakers I had installed and the pattern is very similar. No issues with blinding drivers. Since they come in pairs, I keep the spare with me on the bike.

 

LED bulb conversion

 

DSC02056_zpsi9glwmua.jpg

 

LED bulb goes in just like a conventional bulb. The small/narrow size makes this easier than others.

 

DSC02058_zpshfrywzlt.jpg

 

DSC02055_zpsnpzwnuol.jpg

 

The braided copper is easy to spread out for maximum cooling.

 

DSC02057_zpsogzn6u3f.jpg

 

I routed it out the twist on bulb cover. After this I cover the area where it comes out with some 3M putty for electrical connections. Never hardens so I can change the bulb on the road. Makes it more or less waterproof.

 

DSC02060_zps6luzpmnd.jpg

 

Other than the first trip where the bulb error was on momentarily when going to high beams, it has not shown a CanBus error. That is half the battle, as I also bought a couple of "canbus error" resistor kits that....did not work as advertised. The light output is so much better in rain and dark roads, due to the whiter color as much as brightness.

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lkraus

Any concerns about hot braid coming in contact with plastic and melting the plastic?

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realshelby

No. The braid does not get all that hot at all. NOTHING like the finned bulb assembly I tried would get. You can hold your hand on the braided copper, even after the bike sits without moving for a bit.

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The Rocketman

The link says these are 4800 lumens. Do they shoot light any further down the road, or are just waaay brighter than the Osrams? Also is the beam cutoff similar to your old bulbs, or is there a lot of diffusion or light scatter? Couldn't find any videos on-line for these bulbs, but in one still shot it looked like they were lighting up tree tops. Real hard to tell......

Edited by The Rocketman

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realshelby

There is more light down the road, simply because there is more light output from this LED bulb vs the incandescent Osram Nightbreaker or stock bulb. I do not notice much of the scatter you mention, again there is more light everywhere. But it still has a nice sharp cutoff. Unlike HID where there is 360 degrees of full output, these have two led elements that mount in a horizontal plane. That may be better as far as light scatter goes. No way to compare the online photos, those are in cars and every car would be different. I don't have a way to measure lumens, but judging from the other bulbs I tried they are about the same.

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The Rocketman

Thanks. I corrected my post above as the site says 4800 lumens per bulb.

I was concerned where it said "•Beam Angel: 360" but you answered that.

A while ago I installed 3 Osram Rallye 65W Ultra High Output Special Service H7 Headlight Bulbs at 2100 lumens each on my '09 RT and they were much improved over what came with the bike. Might consider getting what you have after a bit more thought. Guess you're like the LED bulb crash test dummy. Thanks again.

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92Merc

I take it you were able to tuck the little black box behind the cover as well?

 

BTW, we call that electrical putty up here, "bear shit". :-P

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realshelby

If I had to guess, I would say these are not 4800 lumens each. Maybe under certain laboratory conditions. Believe very little of what these sellers write.

 

Which brings me to why I decided to post this. This is the ONLY bulb that worked without having the bulb error light stay on or shut down due to high temps. This, as well as ALL the other bulbs declared on their site to be CanBus acceptable. Which in some cases is completely false. As long as I don't start having trouble, I am satisfied with this bulbs performance and difficulty of installation. The hardest part is cutting the hole in the twist on bulb cover. Which I had good pics of on the other thread.

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realshelby
I take it you were able to tuck the little black box behind the cover as well?

 

Yes, it is behind the cover. Not a lot of room, but enough.

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powwow

Great post and thanks for your experimentation!

 

You mention a lot of air for cooling when the bike is moving, but what about if you're sitting in traffic? Do you think the heat sinks will still move enough heat from the bulb to prevent failure?

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realshelby

Seems to do fine when sitting. I have tested it and the braided copper does not get all that hot. These are a much better heat sink than the fins on the bulb body like other styles.

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WBinDE

There's always one, and this time it's going to be me :grin:

 

Don't you need a long extension cord when riding? It looks like a regular 110V plug in your picture...

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realshelby

Don't you need a long extension cord when riding? It looks like a regular 110V plug in your picture...

 

No! I just wired in one of those 110 volt 60 watt power inverters from Walmart to the battery and plugged the bulb into its outlet. Simple.

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PadG
There is more light down the road, simply because there is more light output from this LED bulb vs the incandescent Osram Nightbreaker or stock bulb. I do not notice much of the scatter you mention, again there is more light everywhere. But it still has a nice sharp cutoff. Unlike HID where there is 360 degrees of full output, these have two led elements that mount in a horizontal plane. That may be better as far as light scatter goes. No way to compare the online photos, those are in cars and every car would be different. I don't have a way to measure lumens, but judging from the other bulbs I tried they are about the same.

First, thanks for the feedback, Terry! This type of bulbs had been around for a while now, and I was very tempted to try one. The only reason was that I have a pair of Osram sitting in a drawer that I wanted to use up first! :)

 

You have answered all of the questions that I had, those many months back. The main one being how hot does the braids get, especially since I was considering cramming everything inside the housing (or try to, anyway)! Putting a hole in the cover is a solution! BTW, back then, I did some research in regards to the light pattern of these bulbs, and in one forum (car related) a member made a good observation in that the two LEDs are mounted in the equivalent position of where you will find the two filaments of the regular H7 bulbs, and therefore the light pattern should be the same! You had confirmed that the pattern is pretty much so!

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realshelby
Would this bulb work without mods? H7 LED replacement, no fan.

 

I tried one LED bulb recommended by the manufacturer as a direct fit for the RT-LC. It did not have a fan. It did not work, even though the manufacturer still lists it on their site ( they did offer a refund, I was still out $28 shipping ). It would get too hot and power down. I don't see anything about the one in the Amazon add that would make me think it would cool better. These might work if they were exposed to outside air for cooling, but I do NOT want my headlight assembly open to the elements. The units with a fan might work ok. But getting them to fit is still an issue. I just read about the Cyclops LED bulbs on another forum. They throw codes when in high beam.

 

The purpose of this thread was to advise others that there is an LED bulb that fits, has minimal modification to make it fit, and other than the first few times I switched to high beam there is no CanBus code warning lights.

 

The problem with ALL of the LED bulbs will be CanBus issues. It is hit or miss. Many will advertise CanBus compliance, but in fact do NOT work with our BMW system. ( Or Ford as I have tried several brands that guaranteed operation.....and none actually worked at all ). Next is fitment. Then the cooling or lack of it as most of these LED fixtures have chip in them to detect overheating and it rolls back power. You might not notice in the daytime, but at night it isn't safe to ride with the lowered output at all.

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AndyS

So Terry, are you happy with those LED's you bought that had the braid?

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realshelby

Andy, I just got back from a 4000 mile trip. A good bit of it was in the dark now that the season has changed. The improvement in vision at night is substantial. I didn't want to add additional lights on this RT, and had this LED not worked out that was what I was going to have to do. I have not had anyone flashing high beams at me. I know there is a larger spread of light, it simply puts out more light. You can see the side of large trucks as you go by for instance. So it may not be a perfect light pattern, but I don't see any sign that it is a problem for other drivers. No CanBus warning at all since the first test, and I was switching to high beam a lot on this last trip. No evidence it overheats even in slow traffic. At this moment I can recommend this bulb with confidence.

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dirtrider

Afternoon Terry

 

Any idea on how much less current those LED draw?

 

Or put another way, is your voltage rectifier/regulator running any hotter?

 

The new 1200WC bikes don't use a conventional alternator like they old bikes did so don't use actual voltage regulator control of the charging output.

 

The new WC bikes use a fixed magnet rotor so the charging output is basically based on engine RPM & stator size with the regulation done by dumping the excess current produced to ground in the remote mounted regulator.

 

Anything the LED's & remainder of the bikes accessories don't use is turned to heat in the rectifier/regulator.

 

I presume the LED's current usage is not too much below the OEM bulbs as your light minder on the dash is not lit.

 

 

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realshelby

dirtrider, no, I don't have the power consumption difference. I have noted that my voltage reading on the dash display stays at 14-14.1 like it did before. Which really means only that the charging system is keeping up.

There are arguments galore about what happens to power from the stator under different loads. There are regulators available that don't dump power back to the stator or elsewhere but simply open the circuit so no power can be produced. I don't know which type regulator the LC engines have.

I suspect there is some kind of load built into the LED bulb I am running to help make it CanBus compatible. The first ride I took it would flash the CanBus light momentarily when I switched to high beam. Only the first ride and never since. That load, if actually there, would make it nearly equal to the incandescent bulb.

Bottom line is that if it is so sensitive it cannot handle a few watts difference in load, and stator issues start cropping up I will worry about that then. Besides, when my low beam bulbs were burning out my RT did not turn on one of the high beam bulbs like some claim happens. So there is 55 watts or so of power that went somewhere.

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dirtrider
dirtrider, no, I don't have the power consumption difference. I have noted that my voltage reading on the dash display stays at 14-14.1 like it did before. Which really means only that the charging system is keeping up.

There are arguments galore about what happens to power from the stator under different loads. There are regulators available that don't dump power back to the stator or elsewhere but simply open the circuit so no power can be produced. I don't know which type regulator the LC engines have.

I suspect there is some kind of load built into the LED bulb I am running to help make it CanBus compatible. The first ride I took it would flash the CanBus light momentarily when I switched to high beam. Only the first ride and never since. That load, if actually there, would make it nearly equal to the incandescent bulb.

Bottom line is that if it is so sensitive it cannot handle a few watts difference in load, and stator issues start cropping up I will worry about that then. Besides, when my low beam bulbs were burning out my RT did not turn on one of the high beam bulbs like some claim happens. So there is 55 watts or so of power that went somewhere.

 

Afternoon Larry

 

I believe that you are referring to a Series type regulator (those do allow a little less stator load when in regulation) but even a series type regulator doesn't take all the load off the stator windings during excess charging.

 

Most OEM BMW's use a Shunt type regulator & those just shunt the excess alternator output to (resisted) ground for voltage control causing a lot of heat in the regulator & alternator stator windings.

 

Even operating with a burnt out headlamp bulb won't immediately fry the stator windings or overheat the regulator but over time the heat can degrade the stator winding insulation.

 

With proper oil cooling of the stator windings they can handle a lot of heat but with BMW's history on stator issues on it's fixed rotor charging systems lowering system electrical draw is something to be aware of.

 

If your regulator is now running considerably hotter than with the OEM bulbs it is just something to keep in mind.

 

Hopefully the system load from the LED's is close to the stock bulb load.

 

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realshelby

Well, since there is enough excess capacity to run aftermarket lights, heated seats ( not on a very high percentage of time ), and other accessories I simply do not see how a bulb drawing 10-15 less watts, if that, can make a difference. If the system were that sensitive there would be failures right and left. If it came to that, BMW would be forced to use a Series R/R for instance.

This has been discussed heavily on the V Strom forums. New V Stroms have series R/R, all the earlier units were shunt. There were stator issues, but most seemed to be from magnets in the rotor coming loose. Many have upgraded their R/R to the type that do seem to keep the stator cooler. Tests were done with IR temp units that seemed to prove the difference in R/R units.

But with all the extra capacity I just don't see how a few watts is a problem.

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dirtrider
Well, since there is enough excess capacity to run aftermarket lights, heated seats ( not on a very high percentage of time ), and other accessories I simply do not see how a bulb drawing 10-15 less watts, if that, can make a difference. If the system were that sensitive there would be failures right and left. If it came to that, BMW would be forced to use a Series R/R for instance.

This has been discussed heavily on the V Strom forums. New V Stroms have series R/R, all the earlier units were shunt. There were stator issues, but most seemed to be from magnets in the rotor coming loose. Many have upgraded their R/R to the type that do seem to keep the stator cooler. Tests were done with IR temp units that seemed to prove the difference in R/R units.

But with all the extra capacity I just don't see how a few watts is a problem.

 

Evening Larry

 

I do know of 3 1200RT (WC) stator failures in my area. (might be more but all I personally know about is those 3) those were on the early 1200RT WC bikes though.

 

There must have been some reason that BMW changed the generator (superseded part) on the 1200RT wc bikes.

 

Hopefully, as you say "don't see how a few watts is a problem"-- a few watts shouldn't be a problem just something to keep in mind when choosing LED lights.

 

The BMW 700/800 bikes have had a great number of stator failures (like almost a given) on the early 700/800 bikes.

 

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AndyS

Hi DR.

Surely that can't be a problem. That is no different to just riding with the much lower powered Angel Eyes with the actual headlights turned off.

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realshelby

Anyone considering an LED ( or HID for that matter ) conversion needs to understand anytime you venture away from OEM there can be issues. The intent of this post was to show through quite a bit of research that there is a more or less plug and play LED bulb that will work in the new RT. If others choose to follow what I done, they are now aware that there is a chance of stator issues. The two biggest hurdles were handled with the bulb I recommended. CanBus warnings and excess heat causing the bulb output to diminish.

I seriously doubt the (3) RT-LC that seen stator failures are all running aftermarket headlight bulbs. Till there is a correlation, I am not crying Wolf.

 

 

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AndyS

I appreciate the post Terry.

I have been following the internet in general over the issue of LED replacement headlights. For years, folk have bought them and then been disappointed.

Now I believe, they are finally 'coming of age' and are achieving better light output than Halogen lamps but also (at last), starting to control the beam pattern to a standard that seems fine for high beam, and maybe, sort of acceptable for low beam. The last hurdle was heat dissipation. The cooling fan is a non starter in my book, however, the high quality braiding being passed out to open air, seems to be adequate.

So, I have bit the bullet and bought a high beam unit for my R1150RT and will attempt to fit it at the next service.

I would like to replace the HID unit for low beam too, but I don't think the beam pattern is tight enough yet. If others can persuade me otherwise, i'll listen.

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mig

ok stupid question, are the stock bulbs on the new bike bulbs or HID's, or ???

 

I up some cheap Chinese HID's that were Can Bus compatible about 3 years ago on my 2007 RT and love them, so much light. No issues ever, bright from the get go. Can these be transplanted to the say 2016 RT ???

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92Merc

Stock bulbs are halogen.

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realshelby
ok stupid question, are the stock bulbs on the new bike bulbs or HID's, or ???

 

I up some cheap Chinese HID's that were Can Bus compatible about 3 years ago on my 2007 RT and love them, so much light. No issues ever, bright from the get go. Can these be transplanted to the say 2016 RT ???

 

What was CanBus compatible on the older bikes may or may not be compatible on the new LC versions. That was a major problem when I was searching for an LED bulb for these. Two things about HID. One is that I have had very poor service with the Chinese stuff. Two is that the nature of the HID bulb means it will have a LOT more light scatter than a LED or Halogen bulb. This can be a significant distraction to other drivers. The LED bulbs can and do tend to have the emitters in about the same location ( measured from the back of the lense ) as the Halogen filaments are. This keeps the light pattern close to the halogen, but there will be a LOT more light.

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realshelby

That looks like the exact bulb. I am sure they are sold under numerous different brands.

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AndyS

Well to my R1150RT I fitted the H3 version (which doesn't seem to be available from this supplier anymore (!).

It wasn't a plug and play solution as I had to modify the OEM bulb holder considerably. I also had to add a ground wire into the headlight unit.

All that being said, I am so far, very pleased with the improvement over stock.

Bear in mind mine is for high beam. The throw penetration is about the same as stock, BUT the spread is much better. So thanks Terry. I am happy with the result.

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KSB

Just installed on my 2016 R1200RT; no canbus issues. Couldn't fit the ballast inside, so I notched the dust cover and brought it outside.

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realshelby

I was visiting this thread to send a link to another owner. Time for an update! Been in the RT for 15 months and many thousands of miles. Still works perfectly. Never a CanBus light since the flicker when I first installed it. Just as bright and does not lose output from heat like some others did. Great light pattern, more or less like the incandescent bulb it came with but more and whiter light.

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AndyS

I've fitted the LED's to both the low and high beam and you can fit the 'ballast' AND the braid inside the covers. I do a lot of night riding and the light colour, brightness and pattern is excellent

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Mike

I just started putting the bulbs in this afternoon, but I cannot get the spring retainers to click into place. Folks, what's the secret? I've previously changed this bulb and didn't have any more than the usual grief, but the base of this thing seems a bit thicker than a normal bulb. Or, maybe I've lost my touch. :cry:

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Paul4450

Hello Mike,

I, too, had problems replacing the retaining springs, and that was with the headlight assembly completely out! I had to use needle nose pliers! I'm not sure why but your theory of the base being thicker may be correct. I was able to put the “box” inside, but it took some finagling and patience. This kit has vinyl seals that can be fitted once you cut the right size and shape hole. Then the braids are well sealed from moisture and dust. The braids can also be spread perpendicular to the long axis as well as apart from each other.

 

I'm glad I decided to remove the headlight assembly versus trying to do install in place. Besides my hands being too large, it saved me a huge amount of frustration! It did not take that long. There is no way I could have done it in place.

 

 

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Mike

 

I'm glad I decided to remove the headlight assembly versus trying to do install in place. Besides my hands being too large, it saved me a huge amount of frustration! It did not take that long. There is no way I could have done it in place.

 

 

What's the procedure for removing the assembly?

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LittleBriar

Check out the attachment.

6860.thumb.jpg.86f6e80d82794bb7da55bfb30860f404.jpg

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Mike
Check out the attachment.

 

Thank you!

 

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LAF

Has anyone run any of these bulbs with a ezCAN attached?

 

I am just curious and do not want to spend this kind of money to have a issue with my ezCAN.

 

TIA

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AndyS

How does the EZCan effect anything? it is not in the headlight circuit?

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LAF
How does the EZCan effect anything? it is not in the headlight circuit?

 

Actually I was replying to the wrong thread in the wrong Forum. I was reading about LED turn signal bulbs that are can bus ready.

 

And to answer you, yes the ezCAN is in the headlight circuit as you get strobe with three quick pulls of the Flash To Pass trigger. If that is not in the headlight circuit I have know idea how it does it.

 

So then you may ask well why would you ask that with turn signals? Well your Aux light on the turn signal side you use turns off so the ezCAN must also be aware of the turn signal circuit also.

 

Anyway my mistake, sorry for spacing out.

 

 

 

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AndyS

Thanks for the explanation Lee.

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lkraus

The ezCAN is not in the headlight circuit (the wiring between the ZFE (central computer) and the lamp). The ezCAN communicates with the ZFE via the CANBUS protocol, instructing it to turn it on, off, strobe, etc. For that matter, your handlebar switches are not in their corresponding circuits, they only communicate with the ZFE, which then controls the corresponding device.

 

Same with the turn signal/aux light interaction - ezCAN sees traffic on the CANBUS that shows the turn signal is on and then it sends a message to the ZFE to turn off the corresponding aux light.

 

As to the original question, an LED bulb would have no effect on the ezCAN. The LED bulb only has to satisfy the ZFE (no bulb out indicator).

Edited by lkraus

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LAF
The ezCAN is not in the headlight circuit (the wiring between the ZFE (central computer) and the lamp). The ezCAN communicates with the ZFE via the CANBUS protocol, instructing it to turn it on, off, strobe, etc. For that matter, your handlebar switches are not in their corresponding circuits, they only communicate with the ZFE, which then controls the corresponding device.

 

Same with the turn signal/aux light interaction - ezCAN sees traffic on the CANBUS that shows the turn signal is on and then it sends a message to the ZFE to turn off the corresponding aux light.

 

As to the original question, an LED bulb would have no effect on the ezCAN. The LED bulb only has to satisfy the ZFE (no bulb out indicator).

 

What is a ZFE?

 

If I put something on the bus ( and is it LIN or CAN or both) and it throws a code something is not going to work.

 

Whatever the reason I have introduced a fault so how that is interpreted by whatever is not the biggest concern to me. Do not misunderstand me I want to know how our bikes work to a point, but I do not care how a signal is sent or received, just that it is correct and causes no issues.

 

That is why I asked, and it was in regards to a LED turn signal and not a headlight. Regardless of the control, if it sees a LED as a issue then anything down stream that relies on that communication is affected, correct?

 

I look forward to your reply as this is a very interesting topic.

 

EDIT:The only information I can find on ZFE relates to HEX.

ZFE

 

 

 

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lkraus

"ZFE" is from the German for Central Vehicle Electronics (Zentrale FahrzeugElektronik, I think). It's the main computer for non-engine electrical components on the bike. It takes inputs from switches and other components, and produces outputs (like lights). It also monitors things like current on a circuit, and takes action if the current is too high or too low. In the wiring diagrams, you will not see any wire directly between a switch and a lamp (or other device). The switch connects to the ZFE, and the lamp connects to the ZFE, and the ZFE decides if it will activate the lamp based on all the information it receives from all the pertinent inputs, communicating via CANBUS. The switches are just inputs, they do not carry the current used by the device, they may not even be operating on 12 volts.

 

The Hex/Camheads used only CANBUS protocol to communicate between components. The Wetheads use a combination of CANBUS and LINBUS protocols. LINBUS is supposed to be simpler, and cheaper to implement, but slower than CANBUS. It might be easier to think of these as languages for the electronics rather than objects - there is no part number for a CANBUS. I have not seen any wiring diagrams or written explanation of how the Wethead divvied up the chores between CAN/LIN, but we don't really need to know that as users.

 

One factor the ZFE can consider is current draw on a circuit. A short circuit or an overly-high wattage bulb will draw too much current. The ZFE will shut down the circuit to save the wiring, display a bulb-out indicator, and "throw a code". It will also shut down the circuit in the event of too little current, such as an open circuit, like a loose connection or a burnt out bulb. Again you'll see a bulb-out indicator and a GS-911 will show a fault code. LED lamps usually draw much less current what the ZFE expects from the stock incandescent bulb, so the ZFE will shut down the circuit. This is probably what happened with your LED turn signal. Simple LED replacements also have a polarity - if you can get them backward they will not work. Some LED lamps include built-in resistors or other circuitry to make the ZFE "see" the equivalent of an incandescent bulb and prevent fault codes. I had similar trouble with my first set of HID lights - apparently the ZFE decided 35 watts per bulb was not enough and just shut them down - sometimes.

 

A feature of the CANBUS "language" is that every component "hears" all the communications between all the devices. My understanding is that the ezCAN is simply listening to the conversation, and using existing signals on the bus to control additional devices. It's not adding to the conversation, it's not telling the ZFE what to do, it's just an eavesdropper. (Which is what I meant by saying the ezCAN is not "in" the headlight circuit, it's not even an input to the ZFE.) For example, the ezCAN can "overhear" the horn button tell the ZFE to sound the horn and then ezCAN flashes the aux lights just to join the fun. If the headlight is acting abnormally and the ZFE decides it's time to cut it off, the ezCAN won't care. (A "turn on an aux light if the low beam burns out" might be a nice option though.)

 

I was hoping to find a good link explaining the BMW CANBUS and LINBUS and assorted related matters,but I'm not having much luck. (And why do Wetheads have fuses again anyway?) Best I can come up with is an old bookmark I have from the BMWRA.org: http://bmwra.org/otl/single-what-system It includes a good deal of history, but the latter half may provide a better CANBUS explanation than I can. Google turns up more generic info on the LIN and CAN protocols but the details are way beyond my need to know.

 

Edited by lkraus

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lkraus
" For example, the ezCAN can "overhear" the horn button tell the ZFE to sound the horn and then ezCAN flashes the aux lights just to join the fun. If the headlight is acting abnormally and the ZFE decides it's time to cut it off, the ezCAN won't care.

 

The wording of that example bugs me and it's too late to edit.

 

The horn button does not send or receive CANBUS signals, it only changes state and the ZFE uses that to change the state of the horn. I really do not know if the ZFE announces on the bus that the button is pressed, or if it says the horn is blowing, or both. ("I have this input" vs. "I'm sending this output") That sort of difference could affect a device like the ezCAN.

 

Lee, in the case of a "faulty" turn signal lamp, there is nothing down stream. You would get a bulb out indicator, and that particular bulb would not work, but the ZFE still knows the button was pressed. With each bulb being a separate output, a good bulb on the other end of the bike would still work.

 

Anton's article in the link shows the ZFE, the instrument cluster and the BMS-K (engine control computer) on the CANBUS. The Haynes Hexhead wiring diagram also shows CANBUS wiring to the ABS controller, the anti-theft system control, the audio system, and what I think is the optional Navigator GPS mount( provide "My Motorcycle" type info?). Again, I do not know which Wethead functions are still CANBUS and which are LINBUS. I suppose some controllers might connect to both.

 

 

Edited by lkraus

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LAF

Thank you.

 

I know LINBUS has been in autos for some time.

 

I guess it needs to be thought of as a network communicating with devices that are on it?

 

All in all it seems like it is a good system but a bit complicated to learn or know what device or input is running on what to where. Also must be some crazy dependencies on devices or inputs between the two.

 

A bit disheartening in that since BMW used CANBUS for so many years that they now have a mix of LIN and CAN. If it is a money saving step even more depressing. I guess with LIN being slower and cheaper what would that mean to us? I would hope things of high importance like ABS and vital motor functions would stay on CANBUS?

 

Again super interesting stuff that I do not think a lot of people realize is going on with our bikes. As a retired Network Administrator I find it fascinating. As a motorcyclist I find it a bit frightening that these dependencies exist on our motorcycles.

 

Still loved the RT and I love my GS even more if that is possible.

 

Again thank you for your time and patience to explain this.

Edited by LAF

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