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Re: Windows 10


Skywagon

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Last night upgraded one PC from 7 to Windows 10...what a nightmare. I had backed up all files on an external drive even though it said personal files, pictures, etc, would be protected. Wrong. It took a good 2+ hours to install and there were no files except the OS and some other windows things. I connected my external drive to pull in pictures, music, documents, etc...NOPE...couldn't read them. It also didn't pull in my Microsoft Office or Basecamp. After sweating bullets for a few hours, I decided to roll back to 7. I did, then connected my backup drive and all my files were there and safe. However, and this is a big however, Microsoft Office products are gone. There is no other recovery points. It wiped them. It reinstalled 7 as if factory new machine

 

The problem is when I bought my machine it came with MS Office and other software loaded. It did not come in a box with a product code or recovery disk. So I call Microsoft tech support today and they tell me it, yep it's gone but happy to sell you a new copy of MS Office 360. Arggh.

 

That's the background. Now I have two questions I hope you can help with. How do I get Basecamp from 7 to 10 and save all the routes and plans I have. I was able to launch Basecamp in 2d but thinks I am new. It sees the latest map but is looking for unlock code also.

 

MS Office....if any of you have found where those files may have gone in 10 or recovery back to 7, I would appreciate that info. I searched almost all night and couldn't find those products.

 

What a PIA....

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Hello David

You were very unlucky with your Win10 upgrade.

I have done multiple Laptops so far and none have failed to upgrade properly.

In regards to your MS products that were pre-installed...

For a very long time now, the PC Manufacturers have created separate hard drive partitions that have a compressed image of your Windows OS and all the additional software.

Failing that, try to contact your PC manufacturer and give them your serial number. They might be able to help you with your license keys. It is them that you have to approach for help, not MS.

Can't help you with Basecamp

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Hi David, I'm also sorry to hear of your troubles. I too had Windows 7 and only upgraded fearing future planned obsolescence of the Win7 OS. In my case my photos and other software including Microsoft Office & Basecamp were carried over fine in the process. My e-mail has been somewhat impaired since the upgrade as I can't get my internet provider e-mail to work on the new mail app and my Hotmail got high jacked to the app and doesn't work right on my Outlook program anymore. So I'm using 2 programs to get my e-mails. I would recommend defaulting IE as the browser for Windows 10 users as I used Edge for a short period and now get more junk e-mail than ever. Sorry I don't have a good enough understanding of Base Camp to be of assistance. :(

 

BTW, one more casualty of a Windows 10 upgrade from Win7 is the loss of the Windows DVD burner utility.

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Charles Elms

Basecamp has a backup and restore under the file menu. I've only done backups not wanting to lose my waypoints, tracks and routes. I don't know how it handles the maps, but this is the first thing I would try. I have not tried a restore so maybe I just have a false sense of security.

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thanks guys...will try some of the stuff you are offering. Spent 90 minutes on the phone with computer manufacture...no luck. Second round with Microsoft, no luck. Truly wish I had never heard of 10 upgrade. Its going to cost me a bundle in time and money...

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Stan Walker

Sorry about your problems. I hope you find a solution!!!

 

You scared me so badly that I went on line and ordered a new Windows 10 system rather than update. My hardware was getting old anyway so this isn't all bad.

 

Stan

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I didn't have any issues upgrading from Win8 to 10. Both BaseCamp and MapSource work fine.

As to get BaseCamp and Garmin to recognize you, you will have to log into your account at MyGarmin.com. When you start up BaseCamp, on the tool bar next to help is a place you can log in, you may also have to connect your GPS for it to verify your ownership. Then you can use GarminExpress to download and reinstall your map data onto your harddrive, so you can read or design routes without having the GPS attached to the computer.

If you don't have your user name and password, you will either have to email or call GArmin Customer service and they can reset it for you. Your GPS is the magic key.

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Update...One of our suppliers was offering, as a benefit to us, a $10 one time purchase of MS Office 2016 Professional. I decided to buy it, download it, and have the disk sent to my home. I reloaded Windows 10 and for some strange reason this time it pulled in all my files except MS Office. I purchased the 2016 version, downloaded and by some miracle all is well.

 

Now to learn to use this new OS............ Tips appreciated.

 

It took me less time to sync the valves, change the oil, and due the 12k check than to upgrade to Windows 10.......

 

BMW 1. Microsoft 0

 

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While others here haven't had problems upgrading, a quick google search will show that you are not an exception.

 

They are persistent, constantly showing pop up ads wanting me to switch for free.

 

Not gonna do it.

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Hi Dave, I was fortunate to have a Windows 8 tablet to help my learning curve to learning 10. At least Win 10 is more on the intuitive side than 8 was. Most features of Win 7 are still there by different paths with that exception of the Windows CD burner. Get used to looking for stuff & settings you want to use in the Apps accessed at the lower LH corner. If still not successful I'd suggest a quick internet search on any feature you can't find in the Win 10 OS.

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Charles Elms

An external hard drive is your best friend! Copy everything from C:\Users to the external drive. After you upgrade you can go back and recover all the stuff you forgot to back up elsewhere. This has saved me many a time. The last time was the MP3TAG macros that I had written and forgot about. Thankfully they were there on my external drive. I have Windows 7 and still run VB6 and had a hell of a time getting it reinstalled when I had to rebuild my system.

 

Best of luck on your upgrade. I will go to windows 10 when I get a new computer and keep my windows 7 machine for it's unique development and execution environment (15 years old, but works). May move to dual boot or VM in the future.

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I work as an IT Consultant.

 

We like to to keep up with the times.

 

Our experience with Windows 10 Pro has been negative, including drive corruption with some hardware configurations. We are not recommending it to our clients. Too many problems. Our clients require 99.5% up times 24/7 and it's not working for us.

 

Pete

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Pete,

 

Are you specifically talking machines that go through the upgrade process from 7 to 10, or machines that come with Win10 preinstalled, or a mix of the two?

 

Thanks for the info!

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Pete,

 

Are you specifically talking machines that go through the upgrade process from 7 to 10, or machines that come with Win10 preinstalled, or a mix of the two?

 

Thanks for the info!

 

Hi

 

We build all our machines in house from selected components and good brands.

 

We sell reliability. They usually stay in service a minimum 5 years running 24/7.

 

The downside of this is we don't sell as many machines, the upside is we rarely have warranty claims.

 

Windows 10 was new installs in all cases on new machines with a known good configuration, we don't do the upgrades.

 

Removing Win 10 and installing Win 7 Pro removed the problems.

 

Pete

 

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Dave McReynolds

Does anyone have an understanding of Microsoft's true motivations in its push to get everyone to upgrade to Windows 10 so quickly? In all past versions, a lot of customers voluntarily paid to upgrade as soon as the initial bugs were worked out in order to get the enhanced features. Most of the rest upgraded a few years later when Microsoft would announce that they were going to stop supporting the old version. Now, it doesn't seem that offering a free upgrade is enough, tales abound of strong-arm tactics and tricks to get people to upgrade whether they are ready are not.

 

In my case, I upgraded my two computers with no real problems other than some minor hiccups: my icons wouldn't arrange themselves on my remote monitor the way I wanted and some "file missing" messages kept popping up, which were quickly resolved by a friend with more computer savvy than I have. I won't say I'm any happier with Windows 10, but I'm relieved to be on the other side of the upgrade so I don't have to worry about it anymore.

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fairly simple...products need to continue to evolve to be relevant. Supporting multiple versions cost lots of money. The sooner they can get you to the newer version, the more their operating cost go down. Supporting old code with fixes, patches, security, laws, personnel, storage, compute, people...expensive. Also advertisers are more interested in running on the new bright and shiny than the old. The target market that stays technology current is a better target for advertisers and marketing in general.

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Dave McReynolds
fairly simple...products need to continue to evolve to be relevant. Supporting multiple versions cost lots of money. The sooner they can get you to the newer version, the more their operating cost go down. Supporting old code with fixes, patches, security, laws, personnel, storage, compute, people...expensive. Also advertisers are more interested in running on the new bright and shiny than the old. The target market that stays technology current is a better target for advertisers and marketing in general.

 

Yes, I agree, but why the big push now and not when the last 7-8 versions of Windows were introduced?

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don't know, but suspect slow adoption when paying, so give it away (sunk cost anyway), and cut the opex. Dave as a CPA you know they put this under fas 86 so big deferrals...

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I have read that some features previously included are now subscription based, and there are fears that MS is moving to a subscription model. I can not vouch for the truth of any that.

 

FWIW our 4 machines all updated (I'm not saying upgraded) fine. We found out later that it broke our "HomeGroup" and fixing it was glitchy and maddening. Our wifi has been unstable on all machines, and replacing our wifi router did not help. But these are fairly minor glitches.

 

There are some significant advantages from the earlier versions, and on the whole I would do it again.

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Guest Kakugo

Yes, I agree, but why the big push now and not when the last 7-8 versions of Windows were introduced?

 

Part of it is the same reason Apple has had automatic OS upgrades for Mac's and mobile devices for years now: having a single version across the board reduces vulnerability issues and support costs.

The second part is to maximize cashflow: it's no mystery MS is moving towards a subscription based service. They cannot do it all of a sudden, otherwise they'll push people towards Linux-based OS's and Apple, but the idea is there.

Previously you bought from MS license for X number of computers by making a lump payment. Technically this license is "for life", so you could run a computer for as long as you could without making additional payments to MS.

This meant MS cashflow was great as soon as a new OS was introduced but then became a replacement market, which is something many modern companies aren't truly comfortable with, even if they have a near monopoly like MS does.

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Remember, most of the cash for MS comes from its office suite. The operating system is only a small part of the cash generation for MS. Subscription based is coming and not just for MS.

 

I still prefer Linux to MS, but then again I like knowing how stuff works and not just a user. But if you want to avoid subscription based office suites, try Libreoffice, Openoffice, or Google Docs.

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I have read enough troubling stories over the past few months for me to ignore the consistently badgering popups for the Win10 update. I'm holding off and have no intention of making the jump soon (if at all). I'm not 100% decided yet, but I'm thinking I'm going to milk this PC a little longer and then just bite the bullet and make the switch to Apple. I've had good luck with their mobile devices and networking hardware, but could never bring myself to take the computer plunge. I have built every PC I've ever owned dating back to the early 90's, so taking a hands off approach is certainly new to me. That being said....if I'm going to have to learn a new OS, I think I want it to be from Apple instead of MS.

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Guest Kakugo
I have read enough troubling stories over the past few months for me to ignore the consistently badgering popups for the Win10 update. I'm holding off and have no intention of making the jump soon (if at all). I'm not 100% decided yet, but I'm thinking I'm going to milk this PC a little longer and then just bite the bullet and make the switch to Apple. I've had good luck with their mobile devices and networking hardware, but could never bring myself to take the computer plunge. I have built every PC I've ever owned dating back to the early 90's, so taking a hands off approach is certainly new to me. That being said....if I'm going to have to learn a new OS, I think I want it to be from Apple instead of MS.

 

I have an iPhone and I concur with you: Apple knows what they are doing when it comes to mobile devices. However I've also had three Mac's and I was far from impressed with any of them.

Not bad at all, but from overpriced to seriously overpriced for the performances when pitted against custom-built PC's.

 

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I have read enough troubling stories over the past few months for me to ignore the consistently badgering popups for the Win10 update. I'm holding off and have no intention of making the jump soon (if at all). I'm not 100% decided yet, but I'm thinking I'm going to milk this PC a little longer and then just bite the bullet and make the switch to Apple. I've had good luck with their mobile devices and networking hardware, but could never bring myself to take the computer plunge. I have built every PC I've ever owned dating back to the early 90's, so taking a hands off approach is certainly new to me. That being said....if I'm going to have to learn a new OS, I think I want it to be from Apple instead of MS.

 

I have an iPhone and I concur with you: Apple knows what they are doing when it comes to mobile devices. However I've also had three Mac's and I was far from impressed with any of them.

Not bad at all, but from overpriced to seriously overpriced for the performances when pitted against custom-built PC's.

 

Yup, thats my hang up. My hand built PC's tend to last a LONG LONG time and have had very few issues. I've just been out of the game so long that I wouldn't even know where to start with regards to researching what hardware to build into a new one. That being said, I'd love to ditch our entire computer desk, tower, and rats nest of associated wiring. We bought my parents an all in one PC from Best Buy a few years ago and it has been a complete head ache causing piece of garbage. The iMac's are SO much more expensive, but I my hope is that I could just plug it in and use it without having to screw with it consistently (like I've had to do with every store bought PC I've ever come in contact with). Maybe its a pipe dream and I should just do the research and build myself another tower that will get me through another decade.

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Years ago I supported Mac's in a laboratory - one of many labs I supported. Mac's used to use a thing they called, "phone net." WHAT A PITA!!! After that, we got newer Macs that relied on ping to be able to connect to servers. They would ping before attempting to connect. Well wouldn't you know it, our networking people shut off ping as it was a security vulnerability. Took about a week to figure that one out. That's when I stopped working with Macs by choice. I am sure they have gotten much better.

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I can't resist a tiny hijack. I got a call this afternoon from a 404 area code (Atlanta) number from a man with an Indian accent, and judging from the background noise, he was operating in a call center. "Hello, I want to talk to you about your computer, sir." Unfortunately, I burst out laughing, and told him to get lost, rather than staying on the line to find out what he was pitching. 99% probability he was going to say that my computer had a serious Windows problem, which he would offer to fix for a small fee. Since I was using a Chromebook, that would be highly unlikely.

 

If I ever get another of these, I'll try not to explode in laughter, and string the fish along for as long as I can. Reported number to nomorobo.com (this was only the 6th caller who has leaked through since I signed up with nomorobo.com last May).

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Selden,

 

The problem with scams like this is they spoof the number they're calling from (as well as being idiots about why they're supposedly calling...)

 

I've gotten spam calls on my cell before, and if they're not numbers I know, I let them go to VM. They started out showing up as calls from outside the state, but then things changed. They then started up showing up as calls from the same area code and exchange as my cell number. Made it very tempting to answer, but after the first few left no VM, I figured out what they were doing.

 

The worst one was last week, when I got a call from another Maryland area code, but the same last seven digits as my wife's cell phone. I still haven't figured out how they did that.

 

As far as the guys calling from "the Microsoft support", I just ask them which computer they're calling about, since we have quite a few at the house. I ask them for the IP address, or MAC address, so I can make sure I'm on the right machine, and soon enough, they hang up. :dopeslap:

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Today 8:05AM, I fire up my Windows 10 netbook to check the forecast and handle a few emails.

 

8:10AM I get a pop-up advising me Windows will be rebooting at 10:30AM to install an update. I don't like a computer telling me when it will reboot, but I've not been given a choice, and I expect to be out in the shop within the hour, so no real problem.

 

8:25AM I've nearly finished a lengthy email to my niece with some hard to find web links and a couple pictures. The screen goes blue with a spinning graphic and the message "Updating", the computer reboots and all my work is gone.

 

I do not like tools that make their own decisions and lie about what they will do. How can Microsoft consider this acceptable behavior?

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