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recommissioning the BadAdam


BadAdam

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So, now that my youngest son is old enough to have some memory of me I'm thinking about recommissioning my OG 1999 R1100S. Anyone have any suggestions on what to start with?

 

Bike's been parked for about 4 years in a relatively climate controlled garage (in California) with a small pile of stuff on and around it. Gas tank is drained, battery is dead.

 

Should I do anything special as I start up again from an emotional/physical/spiritual/marital point of view? Haven't ridden a motorcycle now in about 3 years and I it's time to break out the leathers and get on to some twisty mountain roads.

 

Suggestions from old farts, cantankerous grey hairs, reluctant fathers and those over 40 with children are most especially welcome.

 

Technical advice welcome as well for all you oilhead guys.

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Your leathers shrunk.

Should've kept them in a climate controlled closet.

;)

Good once over for any seepage

Tires

Battery

Fresh gas

new oil/filter

inspect plugs

turn key

remind yourself they are supposed to sound like that

ride

Best wishes.

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Your leathers shrunk.

Should've kept them in a climate controlled closet.

;)

Good once over for any seepage

Tires

Battery

Fresh gas

new oil/filter

inspect plugs

turn key

remind yourself they are supposed to sound like that

ride

Best wishes.

 

 

Check on all that. Currently debating losing weight or buying larger cowskins...

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Bring it to me. I can fix it :P

 

Now this sounds like a GREAT idea. Maybe a road trip up to your neck of the woods to get me out of dodge...

 

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Get out here stat Marty. I've got a 911 and don't know how to drive it...
Just want to say hi Bad! Gotta get back to socal. :wave:

 

That I could do. Used to instruct for the Porsche Club at several race tracks. Love the pre w/c 911's.

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If the leathers have shrunk, make sure you find a new set, and make sure you get your gear ready to ride, as well as the bike.

 

As to your skills, MSF used to have an Experienced Rider Course, which I took when I got back on a bike after twenty something years off. Closest thing they have now is the Advanced Rider Course. If you have other options, that's cool, I have no affiliation with the MSF.

 

Maybe a tour through the Ride Well forum here.

 

Hope it all goes well!

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Brake lines are 16 years old. That's one failure you cannot survive if you're going to be riding it where I think you are.

 

Tires just because of age.

 

Remove and fully drain the tank, as in completely, and change the fuel filter while you're at it. May have gummed up. Change the oil and filter. New battery, of course.

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If it were me, I wouldn't plan on anything terribly ambitious for the first little while. Tootle around the neighborhood and around town when it's not important that you be anywhere. Do that for a few weeks to ease yourself and the bike back into riding regularly.

 

Yes, it is like riding a bicycle (funny that), but your goal is to re-learn a few things, not go out and set some speed record up in the hills. Every year some kid dies on his bike, on the first nice day of the year, because he got on and started zipping around like an idiot, when his judgement and skills are rusty. Just my $.02

 

For the bike - Put a new battery in. If you want to get excited about it, maybe change the oil. Personally, I tend to wait until things break, before I go fixing them. YMMV.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Dennis Andress

Kind of simple, lots of work, but simple.

 

Take apart everything you reasonably get to and clean it.

If it's rubber replace it.

If it's an oil seal replace it.

If it's an o'ring replace it.

Clean and inspect every piece of wire you can see or touch. If you find wire that has been in contact with oil replace it.

 

That should take care of most things...

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  • 4 weeks later...

Good evening BadAdam,

 

Go to Google and type in or cut and past Waking the Sleeping Beast by Phil Pick. He is a long time British bike expert and has put together a short article for bringing back to life any long sitting machine. While this was written for British bikes, it will be equally useful in many respects for any bike. I have used it for a 20 year old barn find Triumph.

 

Good luck, John

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