Jump to content

I May Have A Problem Here...


Guest

Recommended Posts

Given the sorry state of my RT heel plates and how no protective film would last more than a few weeks, I decided to have them powdercoated.

 

Little problem: while attempting removing the rear brake master cylinder I did not heat the bolts enough and managed to strip both bolt heads.

Coming from me, who always heat any bolt I remotely suspect of being thread locked, it's more than embarrassing. :dopeslap:

 

Note that the bike is fully functional (this little accident happened last Winter) and perfectly rideable.

 

The obvious course of action would be to remove the whole heel plate, M/C and all, put it on the bench, cut a slot in the bolts, heat them as much as needed, and remove them.

 

Problem is I have no intention of removing the M/C from the bike as I am not a big fan of draining, refilling and bleeding an iABS equipped bike (2009 MY). Flushing the system is one thing, draining it quite another.

 

Any "miracle cure" I can use to get those two bolts out without removing the M/C? I am asking because over the next few weeks I'll have some parts from the Honda powder-coated and while I was at it I may as well have these done as well.

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment

Morning Kakugo

 

Your problem is something that probably doesn't have a straight out internet answer as the attack can change as the job progresses.

 

Personally I usually address stripped bolt heads in couple of ways.

 

_First is to weld on a flat washer to the bolt head then weld a nut to the washer then simply back the bolt out. The welding heat usually loosens the bolt so they come out easily. Problem is: you have a painted part with recessed bolts so the washer method is a last resort type thing.

 

_I do believe on removing the bolts you are referring to I would (at least try first)-- Drilling the bolt heads off, then remove the side plate from bike frame & from the master cylinder. Once the side plate is off then (carefully) heat the master cylinder bolt bosses then use a pair of Vise-Grip pliers to grab the bolt stubs & back the bolts out that way.

 

If the heating & Vise-Grips doesn't work then next to try is the washer/nut welding thing.

 

If that doesn't work then remove the master cylinder from the bike & fixture it up in my Bridgeport & machine the bolts out.

 

Link to comment

Since you are repainting anyway, DR's welding method might be a good option. MY welding ability is such that I'd probably damage the heel plate. I'd go for drilling off the head, with the heel plate removed and clamped in my drill press. A lot depends on the tools at your disposal.

 

Problem is I have no intention of removing the M/C from the bike as I am not a big fan of draining, refilling and bleeding an iABS equipped bike (2009 MY). Flushing the system is one thing, draining it quite another.

 

Actually, the RepROM refers to the exact same procedure for all filling, flushing and bleeding operations. Removing the brake cylinder and plate as a unit to use a better working position can reduce the risk of damage to the plate while drilling or grinding the bolt head.

 

Link to comment

 

Problem is I have no intention of removing the M/C from the bike as I am not a big fan of draining, refilling and bleeding an iABS equipped bike (2009 MY). Flushing the system is one thing, draining it quite another.

 

Actually, the RepROM refers to the exact same procedure for all filling, flushing and bleeding operations. Removing the brake cylinder and plate as a unit to use a better working position can reduce the risk of damage to the plate while drilling or grinding the bolt head.

 

I've read it and that's when I decided to let the dealer handle anything brake fluid related. Plainly put there's no way I could do that without causing a major disaster. ;)

 

In short heel plates stay on, scuffs and all. It was worth asking. :thumbsup:

Link to comment

I've used wide (3 inch) vinyl electrical tape to keep soft luggage from scuffing painted surfaces. Cheap and easily replaced. Call it a racing stripe...

Link to comment
I've used wide (3 inch) vinyl electrical tape to keep soft luggage from scuffing painted surfaces. Cheap and easily replaced. Call it a racing stripe...

 

Tried that trick... I need something that lasts more than a single ride. ;)

Link to comment

I've used a layer of SOLAS (or you could use DUCT tape) then cut a thin piece of flashing aluminum over the first layer of SOLAS, then a layer or two of SOLAS over that... THAT LASTS, it may wear down to the flashing aluminum, but will never get to the paint.

Link to comment
I've used wide (3 inch) vinyl electrical tape to keep soft luggage from scuffing painted surfaces. Cheap and easily replaced. Call it a racing stripe...

 

Tried that trick... I need something that lasts more than a single ride. ;)

 

Have it painted with bed liner paint. They have it in clear too.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...