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Owner self maintenance impact on BMW warranty


thataintworkin

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thataintworkin

Hi, I'm the new owner of a 2015 R1200RT and plan to conduct the normal maintenance procedures myself starting with the 600 mile

"run in" check and moving forward. The dealer implied that they would need to do at least the initial "run in" check and that I should purchase all of my consumables (filter, oil, etc.) from them so that I would have some proof that the work was done at the appropriate times.

 

My assumption is that I will need this warranty based on my previous experience with my 08 K1200GT so I do not want to void the manufacturer warranty. In addition I may add an extended warranty and am questioning the same thing with whichever company I choose to go with on that.

 

Can anyone speak to actual experiences with warranty claims (good or bad) by BMW where the routine services had never been conducted and verified by a BMW dealer?

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The Magnussen-Moss act protects consumers from manufacturers that would require owners to have maintenance done at dealers or buy manufacturer labeled maintenance items to keep warranty in effect.

 

Here is what you need to do: buy a small notebook and folder. Write in the book every time you do ANY maintenance to the bike. Warranty schedule or not. Keep every receipt for the oil, filters, spark plugs, brake pads, etc. You are required to use items that meet BMW specifications. Such as the correct specification for oil, correct spark plugs, etc. This record of actually doing the work and buying the components WILL stand up should the manufacturer say it was not serviced and therefore they will not cover warranty claims. You do have to follow Manufacturer schedules. Would having work done at the dealer give you a better chance of getting a warranty claim taken care of quickly? Maybe, but remember that the dealer does not have much say about approval on claims, BMW makes that approval. There is no reason they should know whether the bike is serviced by the dealer or owner at that point.

 

An extended warranty is not a warranty. It is a service plan. Not an extension of the base warranty a new bike has. It won't cover as much. But it will cover a lot that can and does go wrong on a machine. I don't buy them, but I would be doing the work myself after the warranty. If you can't, or don't want to, what you are paying for is peace of mind. Which only lasts till you try to get a claim paid. Only buy a name brand extended warranty!

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thataintworkin

Thank you for the feedback. Great advice on the logging and receipts. I will certainly take your advice on this.

 

I still need to research the extended warranties a bit but have some time to do so. My main concern for considering the purchase of this additional warranty are things like the ABS module (I have one dead currently on my other bike), the final drive issues, the many new electrical devices this new RT has now incorporated. The jury is still out on IF I should go this route and WHICH company to choose if I do.

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The Magnussen-Moss act protects consumers from manufacturers that would require owners to have maintenance done at dealers or buy manufacturer labeled maintenance items to keep warranty in effect.

 

Here is what you need to do: buy a small notebook and folder. Write in the book every time you do ANY maintenance to the bike. Warranty schedule or not. Keep every receipt for the oil, filters, spark plugs, brake pads, etc. You are required to use items that meet BMW specifications. Such as the correct specification for oil, correct spark plugs, etc. This record of actually doing the work and buying the components WILL stand up should the manufacturer say it was not serviced and therefore they will not cover warranty claims. You do have to follow Manufacturer schedules. Would having work done at the dealer give you a better chance of getting a warranty claim taken care of quickly? Maybe, but remember that the dealer does not have much say about approval on claims, BMW makes that approval. There is no reason they should know whether the bike is serviced by the dealer or owner at that point.

 

An extended warranty is not a warranty. It is a service plan. Not an extension of the base warranty a new bike has. It won't cover as much. But it will cover a lot that can and does go wrong on a machine. I don't buy them, but I would be doing the work myself after the warranty. If you can't, or don't want to, what you are paying for is peace of mind. Which only lasts till you try to get a claim paid. Only buy a name brand extended warranty!

 

The one bike I'd definitely get an extended plan on is the K1600. Too expensive if bad things happen.

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The warranty is voided if, and only if, the wrok done is non-conforming and that casues the problem.

 

That said, we had a meember years ago post of arefusal based

on choic of oil filter.

 

I'd have them do the 600 miles service.

Then document, inc. photos and receipts.

 

 

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Afternoon thataintworkin

 

You REALLY should to talk this out with your selling/local dealer & get a clear understanding between you & them up front.

 

Your dealer is your first line in fighting for warranty service that falls through the normal cracks.

 

While it's true that you are basically covered by the MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT all BMW has to do is say NO. Then it is up to you to find a lawyer & sue the dealer or the motor company to get repairs or compensation.

 

If you don't have everything documented to a tee & didn't use approved equipment for the service (such as dealer computer if that is spelled out in the service procedure) then it will be on you (& your lawyer) to prove that what you did meets BMW service requirements.

 

In most cases the dealer will work with you as long as they know you are qualified to do the service work & have knowledge that you are using approved parts/fluids, etc.

 

Also keep in mind that anything that happens just out of warranty or due to questionable circumstances-- here is where you REALLY want your dealer on your side & pulling for you & not against you.

 

Get your dealer on your side & feeling comfortable with what you have in mind-- then doing your own service work should not be an issue in the future.

 

If the dealer doesn't understand, or fights you on this, then you are definitely dealing with the wrong BMW dealer.

 

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Your dealer is your first line in fighting for warranty service that falls through the normal cracks.

 

In most cases the dealer will work with you as long as they know you are qualified to do the service work & have knowledge that you are using approved parts/fluids, etc.

 

Also keep in mind that anything that happens just out of warranty or due to questionable circumstances-- here is where you REALLY want your dealer on your side & pulling for you & not against you.

 

Get your dealer on your side & feeling comfortable with what you have in mind-- then doing your own service work should not be an issue in the future.

 

 

 

And that's the rub with doing your own service work. If you do, you really don't have a dealer for other than buying a bike and at best a source for service parts. I'd bet most of us self-service types don't buy parts from the dealer. If I had to use a dealer for service, a BMW would be the next to last bike I'd buy.

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While it's true that you are basically covered by the MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT all BMW has to do is say NO. Then it is up to you to find a lawyer & sue the dealer or the motor company to get repairs or compensation.

 

If you don't have everything documented to a tee & didn't use approved equipment for the service (such as dealer computer if that is spelled out in the service procedure) then it will be on you (& your lawyer) to prove that what you did meets BMW service requirements.

 

Requiring a consumer to use a Dealer computer as part of a scheduled service is ok. But the dealer cannot charge for that service under those conditions. While it is true that the consumer could in a court of law be required to prove they checked the onboard computer in a fashion equal to the BMW service tool, I think BMW knows that is a dead end as Hexacode would no doubt be willing to step in and show proof that their GS 911 tool looks at and checks all things required on a particular service.

 

The real reason I do my service is quality of work. I just finished a 12k on my new RT. Dealer buggered up the threads in the final drive plug hole when I let them do the other service. I tapped it and I think it is fine now. I am SURE the tech knew it, as it came out hard. So I know it went in with too much effort also.

 

Here is a bit of info about the topic:

 

From MLM Law

"Tie-In Sales" Provisions

Generally, tie-in sales provisions are not allowed. Such a provision would require a purchaser of the warranted product to buy an item or service from a particular company to use with the warranted product in order to be eligible to receive a remedy under the warranty. The following are examples of prohibited tie-in sales provisions.

 

In order to keep your new Plenum Brand Vacuum Cleaner warranty in effect, you must use genuine Plenum Brand Filter Bags. Failure to have scheduled maintenance performed, at your expense, by the Great American Maintenance Company, Inc., voids this warranty.

 

While you cannot use a tie-in sales provision, your warranty need not cover use of replacement parts, repairs, or maintenance that is inappropriate for your product. The following is an example of a permissible provision that excludes coverage of such things.

 

While necessary maintenance or repairs on your AudioMundo Stereo System can be performed by any company, we recommend that you use only authorized AudioMundo dealers. Improper or incorrectly performed maintenance or repair voids this warranty.

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While it's true that you are basically covered by the MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT all BMW has to do is say NO. Then it is up to you to find a lawyer & sue the dealer or the motor company to get repairs or compensation.

 

If you don't have everything documented to a tee & didn't use approved equipment for the service (such as dealer computer if that is spelled out in the service procedure) then it will be on you (& your lawyer) to prove that what you did meets BMW service requirements.

 

Requiring a consumer to use a Dealer computer as part of a scheduled service is ok. But the dealer cannot charge for that service under those conditions. While it is true that the consumer could in a court of law be required to prove they checked the onboard computer in a fashion equal to the BMW service tool, I think BMW knows that is a dead end as Hexacode would no doubt be willing to step in and show proof that their GS 911 tool looks at and checks all things required on a particular service.

 

Afternoon realshelby

 

Maybe in the future but as of right now I see a lot of LinBus features on the new water cooled 1200Rt is not yet supported, or the features are Beta, or are listed as coming-in-future.

 

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State consumer laws are involved as well.

At least in Calif you don't need to muck about with a notebook or taking pictures of the newspaper with your oil filter on it.

 

As stated, the burden of proof is with the manufacturer to prove what you did or didn't do caused a failure or issue.

 

Just be smart and use products you won't have to defend.

 

A friend who works at the local BMW car dealer said they got a memo from the mothership "reminding" them that telling customers that having service done elsewhere voids the warranty, will be dealt with rather harshly and is illegal.

It appears it's been an issue.

 

 

 

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Afternoon realshelby

 

Maybe in the future but as of right now I see a lot of LinBus features on the new water cooled 1200Rt is not yet supported, or the features are Beta, or are listed as coming-in-future.

 

DR, that is interesting. I recently bought the new GS 911 WiFi and will be the first to say I don't know enough about it yet.

 

My question to you is "are these LinBus features a requirement in the maintenance checklist"?

 

If so, and the BMW service computer is the ONLY way to do this required part of the service, it is interesting how that works with warranty law if charged for. I'll send off an e-mail to Hexacode tomorrow for their input.

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My question to you is "are these LinBus features a requirement in the maintenance checklist"?

 

If so, and the BMW service computer is the ONLY way to do this required part of the service, it is interesting how that works with warranty law if charged for. I'll send off an e-mail to Hexacode tomorrow for their input.

 

Evening realshelby

 

I have no idea, you will probably have to have your dealer pull up the check sheet for your exact model & VIN wethead then see what is required to satisfy the service requirement.

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My question to you is "are these LinBus features a requirement in the maintenance checklist"?

 

If so, and the BMW service computer is the ONLY way to do this required part of the service, it is interesting how that works with warranty law if charged for. I'll send off an e-mail to Hexacode tomorrow for their input.

 

Evening realshelby

 

I have no idea, you will probably have to have your dealer pull up the check sheet for your exact model & VIN wethead then see what is required to satisfy the service requirement.

The very first item on the wethead maintenance check list is: "Performing Vehicle Test with BMW Motorrad diagnostic system".

 

I am doing my own services, except for that first "600 miles" service, and my dealer can put my wethead on the computer to do what they have to, plus firmware update (I know that I have at least one due), when they get to see my bike next.....to put on a new set of tires.

 

Your advice about record keeping and the receipts to show actual components and oil used is spot on!

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