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Scud

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What is the connection between various motorcycle brands (or specific models) and lifestyles? Another way of asking it: What is the perceived stereotype that goes along with a bike brand?

 

This came up in a different topic where another member is considering a Harley. I thought the question might make an interesting thread.

 

The answers will, of course, be filtered through the experiences of this forum's members, but many of us have other brands of bikes too.

 

So - what is the BMW lifestyle? What is the Harley lifestyle? Do you really meet the nicest people on a Honda?

 

I saw something recently about Moto Guzzi owners that seems to fit: "Skilled old men who thump along the back roads and do their own repairs." Also this: "Moto Guzzi - turning motorcyclists into electricians for almost 100 years."

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Do you really meet the nicest people on a Honda?

 

90% of the time I'll get a wave from a Honda rider, except the Goldswingers. Nothing, never, no matter what I'm riding. Is there a no wave pledge or something if you're a winger? :/ So the answer is sometimes I guess. :grin: PS....I'm quite ok with it, just an observation.

 

I wear a stitch most of the time on my Ultra but, some consider me an oddball. :rofl:

 

Pat

 

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I pillaged and plundered like a Treasure Island buccaneer in another life

(i.e; rode a Harley and checked out civil war sites and old trains with lumpy old guys in lots of black/flames) and found the Harley lifestyle cliche to be a good representation of the actual thing. Not meant to be disparaging or a put-down, it was fun, and if thats what you want, its all good.

BMW's-- I know nothing about. My unscientific view based on motorcycle events like Ephrata and Oley in PA or Hooters bike nights, are BMW riders are the Sheldon/nerds of the MC universe. Safety orange Aerostitch spaceman suits, weird modular blue-tooth helmets, Hi-Tech everything oozing the seriousness of a top secret mission . . . As I go over all the forums here, I get the sense that more than a few people diverge from that mental image in real life.

Out of morbid curiosity, and with some back-up bro'age, I ventured into G'Wing event in Harrisburg back in 2000 or so, and have to say it was very interesting. That lifestyle is not for me, but those guys are very serious about their mileage and trying to one-up each other with the crazy situations they put their mighty heifers in. They had huge photo albums immortalizing their exploits. I left having a new respect for that breed.

What "lifestyle" I am looking for in my first BMW is the romantic part of the BMW mystique-- piling up miles and states--Lots of traveling. I want to be the guy in all the photos of trips on this and other adventure web sites.

We'll see . . .

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Interesting and timely thread. I'm chilling out watching TV and then a Progressive Insurance commercial touting their motorcycle coverage comes on and one would be left to feel that there are no other motorcycle on this planet except HD's.

 

Many years ago, after meeting some folks who were mutual friends of one of my best friends, I mentioned that I rode motorcycles. Their initial response was "Really? What kind of Harley do you ride?" It was obvious that I could have told them I rode a Harley ST1300 Ninja with chrome muffler bearings and they'd have marveled at something they knew nothing about but would have been impressed nonetheless.

 

In other words, the stereotype we, as motorcycle riders, are painted with tends to be filtered though a largely ignorant populace.

 

And that's so sad.

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... I mentioned that I rode motorcycles. Their initial response was "Really? What kind of Harley do you ride?" ...

 

That has been my experience as well. To most non-riders, motorcycle = Harley. A couple people I've run into didn't know that BMW made motorcycles.

 

Most of the Harley guys I wave to wave back. unlike the squids & Goldwingers. But most of them I run into at gas stops, rest areas, etc seem a bit bemused by my ATGATT. I haven't encountered any overt hostility from anyone yet.

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In other words, the stereotype we, as motorcycle riders, are painted with tends to be filtered though a largely ignorant populace.

 

And that's so sad.

 

Yeah - any motorcyclist can be misunderstood and sort of lumped into one big stereotype.

 

I'm hoping to be able to participate in the Distinguished Gentleman's Ride soon - on my cafe-style Moto Guzzi Scura. It's a good charity event and a fun way to build a culture and change perceptions in the classic/custom bike area. http://www.gentlemansride.com/about

Maybe good event for anybody who's got an airhead or other classic at their disposal.

 

On the flip side, I've been watching the TV series "Sons of Anarchy." Some of those Harleys look so cool, but the lifestyle/image is rough as it gets. I actually briefly thought it would be fun to get a Harley Dyna - but then I saw a "high speed" scene and some "cornering" - almost fell out of my chair laughing.

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A couple people I've run into didn't know that BMW made motorcycles.

 

LOL - I got that a couple times when I had an R100CS, but never on my RT (I think because the cop bikes made it more recognizable). But you should try riding a Guzzi around. Hardly anybody knows what they are.

 

Them: Nice bike... what is it?

Me: It's a Moto Guzzi.

Them: Oh.... who makes it?

Me: Doh!

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Different places, different lifestyles... ;)

 

Around here H-D is nicknamed "The Dentist's Bike" because this brand is a favorite of people making over a certain amount of money... after all a Road King in its bone-bare form is considerably more expensive than a fully loaded RT or GSA.

I have been told old carb models are particularly sought after (because...?) and command silly prices, more in less in line with brand new models.

You can easily tell H-D owners around here not so much because of their capacious wallets but because they tend to move in large packs and dress all the same, pillions included.

 

Moto Guzzi owners are reckoned to be the most mechanically illiterate of all. The US/Japanese stereotype of the Guzzi owner being able to fix his ride at roadside with nothing more that duct tape and wire doesn't hold true here. Most Guzzi owners are not even able (or willing) to change brake pads, let alone oil. :rofl:

 

BMW owners are almost as mechanically illiterate and, if possible, even more dangerous (to their rides). DIY tuning, based around dubious components and instructions found on the Internet, is rampant. You may not know how to change brake pads, but you know how to go faster!

Hence you get GS's with completely tired suspensions fitted with full exhausts with O2 wiring cut and somewhat soldered into somce cheap resistors from China. I don't even want to know how the error storage in the BMS-K looks like.

 

Ducati riders are roughly spilt in three categories.

The first is the purists who maintain the last true Ducati is the 888. Given the mechanical frailty of those Ducati's their rides are constantly in the shop, often awaiting parts.

The second is sport bikes enthusiasts. When Ducati introduces a new model, they just have to buy it. No test ride, no haggling with the dealer, no waiting for prices to drop, they are "Shut up and take my money" types. Given most of them are track enthusiasts, the Panigale came as a particular nasty shock. There's no beating around the bush: the Panigale may be an engineering masterpiece but it doesn't crash well, especially at low speeds. What on a 998 may have resulted in little more than damaged (fiberglass) fairings and other stuff you may expect to break on track, on the 1199/1299 is an expensive nightmare.

Third are the Multistrada owners. Nobody likes them, especially fellow Ducati owners.

 

And finally we get to the hipsters. They are a cross-brand phenomenon. Their rides are (in decreasing order) Ducati Scrambler, BMW RNineT, Triumph Bonneville and Moto Guzzi V7.

They all dress the same (open face helmet, preferably Nolan, worn-look jacket, man-purse etc) and in a like scale they are only a step removed from Multistrada owners.

 

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I pulled into a local venue one night on Lord Vader and was looking at a Ducati parked in the bike row. Its rider came out and saw I was wearing an iCON mesh jacket and carrying a helmet and asked what I was on. "That old oilhead." I said, and pointed to it. He said something to the effect of "it doesn't look that old." I just said its a '99, and its got about 75 thousand miles on it." He was floored. "Seventy-five thousand miles! That is ALOT of miles on a motorcycle!". I just laughed and bit my tounge so I didn't say "it would be if it was a Ducati!"

I wear the aforementioned black and white mesh jacket with Forcefield armor in it, or an eBay hiviz orange riding jacket if its cooler. Full face black dualsport helmet or black and white graphic modular helmet, depending on bike, weather, and time of day. Black iCON gloves (local Honda shop my distant cousins own had an iCON sale right after I bought my old K bike. I'm still riding in jeans or carhartt carpenters alot. Not ATG, but MTG. I ride in the boonies a lot, and wear a Second Chance kevlar vest. I hope that since it stops a handgun bullet, it might also stop a strand or two of barbed-wire, which is often what lines the roadsides where I dodge deer.

Most of my riding buddies are either HD or Honda guys. One is both. I got another buddy ogling a FZ9, or maybe even a FJR.

Not a lot of BMW owners my age (37) here. Both my bikes are 15+ years old.

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I think some folks see the BMW marque generally as some sort of lifestyle, whether it's motorcycles or cars.

 

I've owned a series of RTs because of their unique layout and design that worked for me, not because "it's a BMW." It's unlike any other motorcycle mechanically, but I ride it because of its design, not to be different nor to be part of a clan. Yet BMW riders and HD riders are fated to be considered part of their respective clans whether they like it or not. Honda/Yamaha/Susuki riders not so much.

 

So there's lifestyle and then there's perceived lifestyle.

 

One morning after I had backed my camhead into a parking spot in my office building basement garage a woman apparently in her 60s walked by the front of the bike and asked me if I knew where the elevator was. I directed her to the elevator and she thanked me and commented, "nice bike." As she continued walking around the side of the bike she got a better look at it (and, I presume, at the roundel) and added, "...REALLY nice bike!" I was silently bemused again that my bike brand is apparently a statement. Maybe she knows motorcycles, but was it just the marque?

 

I drive an '11 BMW 328 sedan xDrive with a rare manual gearbox. Did I buy it because "it's a BMW" or because it's the only great-handling sedan with AWD and manual trans manufactured anywhere (other than Audi, but I've had a bad history with VWs)?

 

But driving around in a BMW car seems to connote a certain yuppy lifestyle rather than the simple fact that it's the _only_ car available with a silky smooth straight six engine, manual gearbox and AWD that's a joy to drive. I could have bought a new Accord automatic 4-banger FWD sedan for $25k and I would be invisible. But buying a CPO BMW sedan with the driving features I want for the same $25k means I'm making a statement.

 

I also have an old 2004 328 convertible with manual gearbox that my wife and I bought for summer weekend day drives. Is it also a statement or is it just that we were looking for a fun rear wheel drive convertible with a manual gearbox and smooth 6 motor with a real trunk that's not a tiny two-seater shoebox where you sit 1 foot off the pavement? Plus she and I both like heated seats for chilly night drives. But due to the car's brand it's likely perceived as a lifestyle statement, not a cheap joy found on Craigslist with 100k mi for $4500.

 

Anyway, three BMWs in my driveway must be quite a lifestyle statement! (Wife drives an old 2004 Acura TL... pretty invisible except it's a V6 manual and 270hp.)

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While watching a race, I got talking with the guy standing next to me. He is into old Nortons, make that really into old Nortons. He asked what I ride. "A BMW." "Boxer?" "Yeah." "You're not one of those rich guys with a 1200 GS." "Uh, my boxer is a 1200GS."

 

Bob

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"Not a lot of BMW owners my age (37) here. Both my bikes are 15+ years old"

 

Aye, there's the rub.

 

I was 19 when I was lured into beemers by some "old" guys who were 23-24.

Not the way it is today.

My concept of the "BMW lifestyle" is rooted in a previous era.

I wear ATGATT not because I ride a BMW but because I prefer life in my lifestyle.

 

The HD image back then was also radically different than it is today .

 

.02

YMMV

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John Ranalletta

I get lots of comments insinuating that I paid lots of money for the '02 GS and/or when I say I ride a BMW. When I tell folks they could buy a GS like mine for < $5k, they don't believe it.

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Different places, different lifestyles... ;)

 

after all a Road King in its bone-bare form is considerably more expensive than a fully loaded RT or GSA.

 

Not here. RK's start at around 19K< might be 20-21k. Most RTs and GSAs I see are 22K and up.

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Never subscribed to a lifestyle.

 

Ummm... Looking at your avatar, I'd say you are wrong. You are indeed in a motorcycle lifestyle.

 

Gotcha! ;)

 

MB>

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Never subscribed to a lifestyle.

 

Ummm... Looking at your avatar, I'd say you are wrong. You are indeed in a motorcycle lifestyle.

 

Gotcha! ;)

 

MB>

 

Not enough lately.

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I pillaged and plundered like a Treasure Island buccaneer in another life

(i.e; rode a Harley and checked out civil war sites and old trains with lumpy old guys in lots of black/flames) and found the Harley lifestyle cliche to be a good representation of the actual thing. Not meant to be disparaging or a put-down, it was fun, and if thats what you want, its all good.

BMW's-- I know nothing about. My unscientific view based on motorcycle events like Ephrata and Oley in PA or Hooters bike nights, are BMW riders are the Sheldon/nerds of the MC universe. Safety orange Aerostitch spaceman suits, weird modular blue-tooth helmets, Hi-Tech everything oozing the seriousness of a top secret mission . . . As I go over all the forums here, I get the sense that more than a few people diverge from that mental image in real life.

Out of morbid curiosity, and with some back-up bro'age, I ventured into G'Wing event in Harrisburg back in 2000 or so, and have to say it was very interesting. That lifestyle is not for me, but those guys are very serious about their mileage and trying to one-up each other with the crazy situations they put their mighty heifers in. They had huge photo albums immortalizing their exploits. I left having a new respect for that breed.

What "lifestyle" I am looking for in my first BMW is the romantic part of the BMW mystique-- piling up miles and states--Lots of traveling. I want to be the guy in all the photos of trips on this and other adventure web sites.

We'll see . . .

 

'LOVE it! :thumbsup:

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Tall: I was at the Beemers in the Bluegrass rally this past weekend. It is a smallish rally in Kentucky with about 75 attendees this year because the weather forecast was dodgy. Normally it is between 100-125. At any rate, in regard to your comment, my 28 year old son also went on a 1980 R100 he recently got. Another friend, age 45 attended on a 125 scooter kind of as a joke. When handing out the awards, my 45 year old friend got the "youngest rider" because the judges didn't read the entrys right. He gave that to my son, but what does it say that the second youngest rider is 45? I think the hobby is in trouble.

 

When I first started going to that rally in 1998, I had my then 10 year old son with me. There were a fair number of middle age people and at least a dozen children of many ages, some grand children of the riders too. This year, mostly the old guys we middle-agers have become, no children. Those other children who were my son's age then and older , or even younger, are obviously not participating in the hobby. This concerns me.

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Tall: I was at the Beemers in the Bluegrass rally this past weekend. It is a smallish rally in Kentucky with about 75 attendees this year because the weather forecast was dodgy. Normally it is between 100-125. At any rate, in regard to your comment, my 28 year old son also went on a 1980 R100 he recently got. Another friend, age 45 attended on a 125 scooter kind of as a joke. When handing out the awards, my 45 year old friend got the "youngest rider" because the judges didn't read the entrys right. He gave that to my son, but what does it say that the second youngest rider is 45? I think the hobby is in trouble.

 

When I first started going to that rally in 1998, I had my then 10 year old son with me. There were a fair number of middle age people and at least a dozen children of many ages, some grand children of the riders too. This year, mostly the old guys we middle-agers have become, no children. Those other children who were my son's age then and older , or even younger, are obviously not participating in the hobby. This concerns me.

 

I don't know how it is in the US, but if you see how much a 20 year old would pay to insure a simple 200-300cc machine here you would understand why young riders are evaporating.

And this is on top of how expensive getting a license has got and how many restrictions licenses have.

Thanks to the marvels of lobbying, a youth on a restricted license pretty much has to buy new because older bikes, even in the 350-400cc category, are off limits for him.

Honda and KTM (the most active lobbyists in Europe) helped kill at least a full generation of future customers through their greed: they hoped to have "cradle to the grave" customers but are ending up with large stacks of unsold bikes...

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I get lots of comments insinuating that I paid lots of money for the '02 GS and/or when I say I ride a BMW. When I tell folks they could buy a GS like mine for < $5k, they don't believe it.

 

I used to could say I had less than $5k in both of mine. Now I have to say $6k. But now I've had the baby brick for four years, and accumulated some spares for the oilhead. Plus tires, tags, insurance and maintenance add up. Feel like I am getting my $$ worth though. Love this motobrick more every year. Hope I bond this well with the oilhead, but I've only managed to put 3k on her in our honeymoon year.

I better get her going again soon though, because I've got to rebuild the forks on the motobrick soon and I won't want to do without. Hoping to have her ready for a fall weather swap, about the time I start missing that windshield.

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Tall: I was at the Beemers in the Bluegrass rally this past weekend. It is a smallish rally in Kentucky with about 75 attendees this year because the weather forecast was dodgy. Normally it is between 100-125. At any rate, in regard to your comment, my 28 year old son also went on a 1980 R100 he recently got. Another friend, age 45 attended on a 125 scooter kind of as a joke. When handing out the awards, my 45 year old friend got the "youngest rider" because the judges didn't read the entrys right. He gave that to my son, but what does it say that the second youngest rider is 45? I think the hobby is in trouble.

 

When I first started going to that rally in 1998, I had my then 10 year old son with me. There were a fair number of middle age people and at least a dozen children of many ages, some grand children of the riders too. This year, mostly the old guys we middle-agers have become, no children. Those other children who were my son's age then and older , or even younger, are obviously not participating in the hobby. This concerns me.

 

I don't know how it is in the US, but if you see how much a 20 year old would pay to insure a simple 200-300cc machine here you would understand why young riders are evaporating.

And this is on top of how expensive getting a license has got and how many restrictions licenses have.

Thanks to the marvels of lobbying, a youth on a restricted license pretty much has to buy new because older bikes, even in the 350-400cc category, are off limits for him.

Honda and KTM (the most active lobbyists in Europe) helped kill at least a full generation of future customers through their greed: they hoped to have "cradle to the grave" customers but are ending up with large stacks of unsold bikes...

 

Yeah, but it wouldn't happen without a certain mindset on the part of the population and politicians. We push back over here. It's mostly good.

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In the US, it is not daunting at all for a young person to be able to buy a good used bike and ride. The first bike I bought for my son was a 2001 Kawasaki 500 Ninja in the year 2005. It was very clean, so I paid about $4,000 US for it. But, at the same time, there were older ones not so nice but perfectly useable, available for as little as $1,200.00. The insurance was not very expensive either.

So, it the US, the young are not choosing to ride.

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So, it the US, the young are not choosing to ride.

 

It's because us Baby Boomer parents refused to allow them to play in dirt and jump on trampolines like we all used to. Remember lawn Jarts and those Cox model airplanes that could take out a city block? Unthinkable now. Heck, 16 year olds don't even beg to get their driver's licenses anymore. Do kids still want to rule their neighborhoods on Big Wheels? Definitely not. No more Evel Knievel. You know you wanted to be just like him.

 

Data suggests that motorcycle sales are moving up, albeit slowly. Still well under 2009's peak though.

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So, it the US, the young are not choosing to ride.

 

It's because us Baby Boomer parents refused to allow them to play in dirt and jump on trampolines like we all used to. Remember lawn Jarts and those Cox model airplanes that could take out a city block? Unthinkable now. Heck, 16 year olds don't even beg to get their driver's licenses anymore. Do kids still want to rule their neighborhoods on Big Wheels? Definitely not. No more Evel Knievel. You know you wanted to be just like him.

 

Data suggests that motorcycle sales are moving up, albeit slowly. Still well under 2009's peak though.

 

I still have a set of Jarts.... I know, your amazed. lol. And your right about teenagers. They want nothing to do with cars and mobility anymore. With the ability to contact their friends through snapchat, why would they ever need to actually move around. Before you say "to get a job", think about that for a second. That generation truly believes they will be able to sit at home and work in their underwear all day long.

 

Shawn

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No more Evel Knievel. You know you wanted to be just like him.

 

Guilty as charged. I used to build ramps for my Schwinn Stingray - jump ditches, other kids, whatever we could find.

 

Lot's of interesting observations here. I'm particularly intrigued by the international differences and the transition in lifestyle image over time.

 

A friend of mine in England is fascinated by Harley - and I've had a bunch of European bikes. Harley and BMW have both moved upscale, to the point that it's difficult for their smaller-displacement bikes to be taken seriously.

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That generation truly believes they will be able to sit at home and work in their underwear all day long.

 

Shawn

 

If you can get that work, more power to you.

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I have 5 kids, ages 10-20. They are tame compared to what I was like at their age. On the other hand, I have 4 girls, so that makes a difference, but even the boys I meet are different. These kids have relationships by texting. SMH. The plus is that they don't drink or do drugs. We were much worse that way. Drinking, doing burnouts with dad's car or our own, just crazy shit. I'm lucky to be alive.

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........... We were much worse that way. Drinking, doing burnouts with dad's car or our own, just crazy shit. I'm lucky to be alive.

 

You say that like it's a bad thing.

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........... We were much worse that way. Drinking, doing burnouts with dad's car or our own, just crazy shit. I'm lucky to be alive.

 

You say that like it's a bad thing.

 

The jury is still out.

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  • 1 month later...

The Cafe Racer has taken over the youngsters in Texas and anything with 2 wheels is fair game. Scooters are hot with the kids. Lots of fun and participation. I have several bikes couple of BMW a Vulcan and a 64 Triumph Bonneville. BMW seem to get you more respect from non riders, they seem to think we ride around the world on the week ends.

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We like sport, sport touring, and DS riding.

 

Saw a Honda CX500 shaft drive Cafe Racer, decided to build one. Found a 1980 CX500D project bike the owner had apart and bolted major parts together then put on Craigslist for $375. He delivered the bike to my home with clean title. Changed direction on the bike and installed a Dirt Track seat pan with European style handlebars. A friend that paints road race bikes painted the pearl white parts and had the frame and various other parts powder-coated.

 

Would work on it for a month at a time until completed. Now it's first out in the garage. Enjoy riding the bike every evening, unless it's bad weather.

 

Currently building a 1999 Ninja 250 Cafe Racer for my 5'2" Wife, so she will have a lowered road bike for the evening rides.

 

1980 Honda CX500D project:

 

IMG_4222.jpg

 

IMG_3396_zps6126582a.jpg

 

1999 Ninja 250 Cafe Racer Project:

 

IMG_0135-1_zps5c5c1981.jpg

 

IMG_7074_zpsbjn3kup5.jpg

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........... We were much worse that way. Drinking, doing burnouts with dad's car or our own, just crazy shit. I'm lucky to be alive.

 

You say that like it's a bad thing.

 

From a guy with Animal House/Belushi Avatar? Figures..beemerboy

 

Back on topic:

Thinking about going over to the local HD dealer who hosts a bike-night on Saturdays just to check it out. I wonder what kind of reception i'll get riding in on a KGT and ATGATT.

I'll report my experience here....

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........... We were much worse that way. Drinking, doing burnouts with dad's car or our own, just crazy shit. I'm lucky to be alive.

 

You say that like it's a bad thing.

 

From a guy with Animal House/Belushi Avatar? Figures..beemerboy

 

Back on topic:

Thinking about going over to the local HD dealer who hosts a bike-night on Saturdays just to check it out. I wonder what kind of reception i'll get riding in on a KGT and ATGATT.

I'll report my experience here....

 

Two predictions, which will depend on the type of dealer/customer base you have there (and this would be a good way to tell which kind, if one wanted to know):

you will get NO attention or very, very little

or

you will get a lot of attention, along with some good natured ribbing, some questions about your bike, and a bunch of people telling they have a bmw, had a bmw, had a friend/uncle/cousin father who had/has a bmw, and how much that persons likes/d it.

 

:lurk:

 

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........... We were much worse that way. Drinking, doing burnouts with dad's car or our own, just crazy shit. I'm lucky to be alive.

 

You say that like it's a bad thing.

 

From a guy with Animal House/Belushi Avatar? Figures..beemerboy

 

Back on topic:

Thinking about going over to the local HD dealer who hosts a bike-night on Saturdays just to check it out. I wonder what kind of reception i'll get riding in on a KGT and ATGATT.

I'll report my experience here....

 

You don't know me and you obviously don't have a sense of humor. I look forward to your Motor Company bike night report. :thumbsup:

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On the contrary, I think it's hilarious!

Like most of you/us soon-to-be old timers I grew up with SNL (although those days, belushi,akroyd,chase,murphy,radner,piscopo are obviously long-gone).

AND reading that comment while looking at your avatar it "sounds" like belushi..

besides, i cant seem to curb my sarcastic sense of humor which cannot be understood in text form.

no harm no foul, ride safe

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+2 on the Jarts.

 

+3 on the Jarts.

 

And my brother recently called me to say it was my fault he recently bought a an old K bike... :)

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I wonder what group I fit in - besides the obvious short bus group?

Let's see....if I ride my RT wearing my 'stitch I guess I'm one of the effete snob Beemer crowd.

But how about when I wear Vansons riding my Norton Commando, my GPZ-550, or my "framer" custom street tracker(Sportster engine)? Does that make me one of the resto crowd?

How 'bout race leathers on my Aprilia Tuono or KTM 1290 Superuke? The "retired" (has-been) road racers?

Then there's putting my restored Z-50 Mini Trail around the neighborhood in flip flops, does that make me one of the surfer boys?(I DO live on the beach near San Diego after all)

I'm so confused......

 

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Lucky Dave - it sounds like you are eclectic multiple bike owner. Maybe you're like an RV owner who feels the need to sticker-in a map with all the places they've been, But your map of the world has countries of motorcycle manufacture. Based on you list, you've got:

Germany

England

Japan

USA

Italy

Austria

 

I'm in Carlsbad - just up the street. Japan an Austria left my garage recently. The current score is Italy 3, Germany 1.

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  • 2 months later...

Here is an observation from someone who is just returning to bikes. I plan to get a new bike this spring. So I have been in just about every dealer around here. I have for years been thinking about getting a bike so have been a keen observer of what lifestyle fits me best ;-)

 

BMW-ATTGAT, with full helmet. Biggest bragging right- how many miles they put on the bike for any given time. Pretty much applies to the fjr crowd also

Sport bike riders- two types First those with no helmet, shorts and mousse hair, and tank tops. Bragging rights - how long the ran the wheely down the interstate and the hot babe the picked up at the beach. Second type the Rossi wannabe. Total color coordinated racing suit with full helmet, Never smiles. Bragging rights - fastest time during track day or how quick they got through The Dragon last year.

Harvey Riders - Either old irascible types who have been riding since dirt was invented. Or the leather vest with patch and rocker. I have noticed a small sub-species of the HD accountant. Usually seen wearing a 3/4 helmet expensive leather jacket and riding a Road King. Usually less than 150 lbs.

 

Not to stereo type....

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Here is an observation from someone who is just returning to bikes. I plan to get a new bike this spring. So I have been in just about every dealer around here. I have for years been thinking about getting a bike so have been a keen observer of what lifestyle fits me best ;-)

 

BMW-ATTGAT, with full helmet. Biggest bragging right- how many miles they put on the bike for any given time. Pretty much applies to the fjr crowd also

Sport bike riders- two types First those with no helmet, shorts and mousse hair, and tank tops. Bragging rights - how long the ran the wheely down the interstate and the hot babe the picked up at the beach. Second type the Rossi wannabe. Total color coordinated racing suit with full helmet, Never smiles. Bragging rights - fastest time during track day or how quick they got through The Dragon last year.

Harvey Riders - Either old irascible types who have been riding since dirt was invented. Or the leather vest with patch and rocker. I have noticed a small sub-species of the HD accountant. Usually seen wearing a 3/4 helmet expensive leather jacket and riding a Road King. Usually less than 150 lbs.

 

Not to stereo type....

 

Yeah, the dayglo half-assed astronauts, mighty morphin Power Rangers and the weekend pirate brigade. I don't subscribe to any "lifestyle". Never have, never will.

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  • 1 month later...
I wonder what group I fit in - besides the obvious short bus group?

Let's see....if I ride my RT wearing my 'stitch I guess I'm one of the effete snob Beemer crowd.

But how about when I wear Vansons riding my Norton Commando, my GPZ-550, or my "framer" custom street tracker(Sportster engine)? Does that make me one of the resto crowd?

How 'bout race leathers on my Aprilia Tuono or KTM 1290 Superuke? The "retired" (has-been) road racers?

Then there's putting my restored Z-50 Mini Trail around the neighborhood in flip flops, does that make me one of the surfer boys?(I DO live on the beach near San Diego after all)

I'm so confused......

 

I think we're related. What year is your gpz?

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I've thought that if I ever bought a Harley it would be a Road King. Now I see that there's something about RK riders that is known to differentiate them from other HD riders. Could someone elaborate on the difference?

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I'd assume that's a joke. I had a new RK in 2001. It shook so bad it drove me crazy. I rode a friends RT one morning and got rid of the RK the next day. No shake and real brakes. :grin:

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lawnchairboy

I had an 03' RK. Did an iron butt ride on it. It was comfy but I got sick of cleaning the damn thing. Put 10k on it and sold it for what I bought it new for. That won't happen with an RT.

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I had an 03' RK.

Chris, I don't think I could ever picture you as a Harley pirate.. :grin:

99009d1267276725-for-those-with-american-flag-holders-happy-pirate.jpg

I just sold a 2009 Street Glide for what I paid for it four years ago. Cheap transport! :thumbsup:

 

Pat

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I had an 03' RK. Did an iron butt ride on it. It was comfy but I got sick of cleaning the damn thing. Put 10k on it and sold it for what I bought it new for. That won't happen with an RT.

Won't happen with a Harley....any Harley now!

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John Bentall

The points raised are interesting......

 

and how interesting that while we as motorcyclists often like to pigeonhole by brand, lifestyle etc., there are a whole load of non-riders who pigeon-hole as "bikers".

 

If we do not like being pigeon-holed, why try to do the same to others.

 

Thank heavens we are all different!

 

Incidentally, my favourite pigeon-hole is those born-again bikers (irrespective of brand) who are buying themselves a "mid-life crisis" in order to return a sense of control and excitement to their lives.

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