Jump to content

07 GSA Spark Plugs


DR  Major

Recommended Posts

Morning DR Major

 

You DO have a 2007 GSA correct as you posed in the oilhead forum here?

 

If you have a 2007 hexhead bike then --

 

My personal favorite---

 

Are the NGK DCPR8EKP, those are very similar to the stock dual electrode plugs only with a bit different (& better according to my NGK rep) electrodes. Same heat range & same thread exposure. The NGK DCPR8EKP are quite a bit cheaper than the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC as you don't need to buy through the BMW dealer.

 

On the BMW hexhead you not only need to watch plug thread size, electrode length, heat range, etc but have to make sure the plug hex size will fit in the engine.

Link to comment
Morning DR Major

 

Are the NGK DCPR8EKP, those are very similar to the stock dual electrode plugs only with a bit different (& better according to my NGK rep) electrodes. Same heat range & same thread exposure. The NGK DCPR8EKP are quite a bit cheaper than the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC as you don't need to buy through the BMW dealer.

 

On the BMW hexhead you not only need to watch plug thread size, electrode length, heat range, etc but have to make sure the plug hex size will fit in the engine.

 

A quick check on Amazon shows the stock plugs for $8.79 and DR's fav for $9.71 (shipping included). Sound right to you DR?

Link to comment
Morning DR Major

 

Are the NGK DCPR8EKP, those are very similar to the stock dual electrode plugs only with a bit different (& better according to my NGK rep) electrodes. Same heat range & same thread exposure. The NGK DCPR8EKP are quite a bit cheaper than the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC as you don't need to buy through the BMW dealer.

 

On the BMW hexhead you not only need to watch plug thread size, electrode length, heat range, etc but have to make sure the plug hex size will fit in the engine.

 

A quick check on Amazon shows the stock plugs for $8.79 and DR's fav for $9.71 (shipping included). Sound right to you DR?

 

Morning Gene

 

Very possible, for the longest time the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC were only available from BMW or outlaw suppliers.

 

Per your post here I just checked Amazon & a couple of other places & it looks like the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC are available from outside suppliers now. (that seems to lower the cost significantly)

 

But that does bring up a new question: OEM spark plugs are always a good choice as those plugs are specifically tested for durability & operation in the engine. The other side of the coin is: According to my NGK rep the NGK DCPR8EKP have more durable electrodes.

 

Personally I will probably stay with the NGK DCPR8EKP as those have worked well in both my 1200 GS-A & 1200 RT.

Link to comment
Morning DR Major

 

Are the NGK DCPR8EKP, those are very similar to the stock dual electrode plugs only with a bit different (& better according to my NGK rep) electrodes. Same heat range & same thread exposure. The NGK DCPR8EKP are quite a bit cheaper than the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC as you don't need to buy through the BMW dealer.

 

On the BMW hexhead you not only need to watch plug thread size, electrode length, heat range, etc but have to make sure the plug hex size will fit in the engine.

 

A quick check on Amazon shows the stock plugs for $8.79 and DR's fav for $9.71 (shipping included). Sound right to you DR?

 

Morning Gene

 

Very possible, for the longest time the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC were only available from BMW or outlaw suppliers.

 

Per your post here I just checked Amazon & a couple of other places & it looks like the OEM NGK DCPR8EKC are available from outside suppliers now. (that seems to lower the cost significantly)

 

But that does bring up a new question: OEM spark plugs are always a good choice as those plugs are specifically tested for durability & operation in the engine. The other side of the coin is: According to my NGK rep the NGK DCPR8EKP have more durable electrodes.

 

Personally I will probably stay with the NGK DCPR8EKP as those have worked well in both my 1200 GS-A & 1200 RT.

I would go along with your logic! I used the DCPR8EIX on my previous '07 RT, and that was an accepted substitute for the original plug. The DCPR8EIX has a single Irridium electrode, which resists discharge erosion better and therefore will outlast the original plug with twin electrodes. Now, the DCPR8EKP, that you like, has platinum electrode, which resists erosion from the electrical discharge better than even the Irridium, and so it should outlast them all.

 

Now, the real question is, after using the longer lasting plugs, should you change your plugs based on BMW's maintenance schedule? For me, it was easy. NO! I inspect the plugs at the required interval, making sure to measure the gaps, and change the plugs only when the gap approaches the maximum limit! No, I don't think that you can reset the gap the way that we used to do, but perhaps I am mistaken in that regard?

Link to comment

 

Now, the real question is, after using the longer lasting plugs, should you change your plugs based on BMW's maintenance schedule? For me, it was easy. NO! I inspect the plugs at the required interval, making sure to measure the gaps, and change the plugs only when the gap approaches the maximum limit! No, I don't think that you can reset the gap the way that we used to do, but perhaps I am mistaken in that regard?

 

Morning PadG

 

BMW's plug change interval is probably based on their (normal) riding testing (whatever that is).

 

As you probably know spark plug electrode wear is based on number of sparks across the electrode gap & intensity of spark.

 

If most of a riders riding is at freeway speeds in 6th gear then the sparks per mile traveled is MUCH MUCH lower than a bike ridden in a low gear at higher RPM's or that sits & idles a lot. In theory you could have 500 hours of sparks on a spark plug but only show 20 miles traveled. An hour meter would probably be a much better service tool on a motorcycle than an odometer.

 

Measuring electrode gap is a good way to tell plug wear as well as visually looking at electrode wear (like rounded electrode area). Nice square electrode edges take a lot less KV to bridge the gap than rounded electrode edges.

 

I have yet to wear a NGK DCPR8EKP to max electrode gap but have seen some electrode edge rounding.

 

Spark plugs are cheap enough (looks like even OEM are now) so I usually just replace at near BMW recommendations when I have the plugs out for something else or have the lower tupperware off for some other service.

 

Link to comment
In theory you could have 500 hours of sparks on a spark plug but only show 20 miles traveled. An hour meter would probably be a much better service tool on a motorcycle than an odometer.

 

I have ALWAYS said that cars and motorcycles should have hour meters on them. You would be able to ascertain the "average" MPH that a car was driven. Was it city miles, or mostly highway miles.

 

That would be a great idea, better than TPMS, etc.

Link to comment
Anyone KNOW if there is really any value to twin electrons vs single?

 

 

Evening DR Major

 

BMW must know as they spec & use as OEM a more expensive dual electrode plug.

 

Just a guess on my part but the upper plug is centered so the dual electrode opens the spark to the mixture over the piston better as the dual center electrode comes in from the sides so doesn't shroud the spark. Same with bottom plug, dual electrode opens the spark to the mixture above it without shrouding the spark.

 

Dual electrodes also give the plug longer life as the spark only jumps one gap at a time so it usually takes the closest electrode first, then when that electrode wears it moves the spark to the other electrode (keeps alternating between the two electrodes until end of plug life.

 

In certain applications dual electrodes give more piston clearance as the electrodes come in from the side of the center electrode rather than over the end of it. (I'm not sure this is a concern on the BMW 1200 but can't say I have ever measured it either.

 

Or maybe it is something as simple as coil protection-- If an electrode would happen to fall off, or burn off, it still has the other electrode to spark to. On a single electrode plug if the ground electrode falls off, or burns off, the coil KV goes through the roof & forces the coil to arc internally to the RFI shield.

 

Added: Or maybe it is just a BMW thing-- Ve have always done it that way!

 

Link to comment

Good morning DR!

 

Actually, the reason that BMW (and others) specifies multi-electrode plug is simply for the longer life, which was one of your guess! I think that this YouTube video, put out by NGK, explains the technical reason very well:

 

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...