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Garage Door Openers


Marlen Padberg

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Marlen Padberg

Hi all, new to this forum. I just purchased a 2010 R1200RT, and its a very impressive machine!

 

On my last bike (Suzuki SV650s), I mounted a push-button switch below and beside the seat and wired it to a garage door opener mounted under the seat. I'm curious how all you folks have solved the 'opening the garage door without dismounting your bike' problem. Something similar? Pics? How do you do it, and what works for you?

 

I would prefer to have a garage door opener hard mounted on my bike (not in my jacket - I have more than 1 depending on the weather), and mounted in such a way that it is not obvious or evident, cannot be stolen or removed.

 

Ideas/thoughts? Pics?

 

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Danny caddyshack Noonan

I have a tank bag that is always with the bike one way or the other. I have it velcro'd to the inside in a convenient location.

 

If you haven't had the displeasure yet, do not replace the light bulbs in your garage door opener with LEDs. You will only be able to open the door due to interference when they turn on. Door will not want to close because the signal won't get through.

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I'm using Stanley Autotrans on all of my vehicles. Unfortunately they are no longer available. With it you wire a receiver to your door opener if it's not a Stanley door opener. Each vehicles has a transmitter wired to the high beam headlight. Double flash the high beam and the door opens. I've got five transmitter and two receivers. Works great. It would even work with my mother-in-laws electric gate. I can't remember the name of a similar item that is available now.

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thumb sized remote velcroed underneath a BMR dash shelf. there's a lip on the front of the shelf so you have to look up & under it to see that there's something there.

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I have my small transmitter mounted on heavy duty hook and loop (Velcro) on the underside of my radio compartment/glove box door. The only caveat is to be careful of items in the glove box pushing against the buttons when you close the door. Upside - lockable. Downside - lockable.

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I bought a small remote transmitter about the size of a silver doller, I just hooked it to my ignition key,down side is you almost have to stop with bike in neutral to use, but its better than getting off the bike and walking, I think there like $12 dollars on flee bay.

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Mounted a toggle switch to the left dash that controls the garage door. I have a, hidden inside the fairing, 12 volt remote that I use that is disassembled and the board is wired for an external switch, and direct wired to the 12 volt battery. The toggle is very convenient, easy to reach and with using the bike battery the range is really good.

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Marlen Padberg

Sounds like a "flash to pass" garage door opener. The F2P requires you to hook up a receiver in your garage. I would rather not do that, so the Stanley autotrans sounds very interesting.

 

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The Stanley Autotrans also requires you to put a receiver in the garage if you don't have a Stanley garage door opener. I have Craftsman openers so I installed the Stanley receivers in parallel to the Craftsman receivers. Both will open the door with the correct transmitter. Unfortunately Stanley no longer makes garage door openers. I only been able to find used transmitters on different ad sites. I just find one on eBay which should be the last one that I need. I now have one for all 6 of my vehicles. If you do manage to find some be aware that Ford's will flash the high beams without the key on so put a relay in line that will cut off the Stanley transmitter if the key is off. This is probably true of the Flash to Pass also.

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I just put a small opener in the chest pocket of my riding jacket. As I approach the garage, I can tap my pocket, and feel like Captain Kirk. "Scotty, open the garage door!"

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Carried a key fob opener for a few years until I dropped my keys once too often. The case would no longer stay closed and I lost the rubber push button. Working with materials on hand (cheapest thing on a BMW is the owner), I found a solution I'm pretty happy with. I had a waterproof momentary contact switch which I installed in the unused radio control cover, and I mounted the fob with velcro under the side panel. I soldered wires to the switch contacts inside the fob, and added some spade connectors inline so I could remove the fob without cutting and re-soldering wires. The button is easy to reach and the wiring does not hinder any repair work.

18935238384_72a1dc7a12_n.jpg

 

 

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I just put a small opener in the chest pocket of my riding jacket. As I approach the garage, I can tap my pocket, and feel like Captain Kirk. "Scotty, open the garage door!"

 

Ha. works for me too, and I get the same visual.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Marlen Padberg

That is more along the lines of what I was thinking.... Does that panel have a release underneath, or does it just pull off?

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Joe Frickin' Friday
I just put a small opener in the chest pocket of my riding jacket. As I approach the garage, I can tap my pocket, and feel like Captain Kirk. "Scotty, open the garage door!"

 

I've been doing that for a long time, but I've often been frustrated because the opener has gotten flipped over in my pocket, and I have to fumble with it to get it to where I can push the buttons.

 

This thread has piqued my interest. I'd like to bury my remote somewhere on the bike, feed it switched power, and activate it with a non-obvious switch somewhere. Will see what I can come up with...

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I would not be too concerned about requiring switched power. The battery in most openers is easily good for four or five years and is only a couple dollars to replace. Powering an opener from the bike means that you will need to drop the voltage from twelve volts to three volts, and add a fused circuit. The only advantage I can see to switched power would be if I parked the bike outside the garage. The car will stay outside before that happens!

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This thread has piqued my interest. I'd like to bury my remote somewhere on the bike, feed it switched power, and activate it with a non-obvious switch somewhere. Will see what I can come up with...

 

I started a little research on this last year. Mostly, because my little tiny garage door remote button (zip tied kind of under the dash) can't really be pushed with gloves on.

 

As another suggested.... Autoswitch has got this mostly figured out, I think. The have a CAN-BUS version as well. I just haven't messed with it yet. Seems reasonably priced. I'd be curious to see what you come up with.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
I would not be too concerned about requiring switched power. The battery in most openers is easily good for four or five years and is only a couple dollars to replace. Powering an opener from the bike means that you will need to drop the voltage from twelve volts to three volts, and add a fused circuit. The only advantage I can see to switched power would be if I parked the bike outside the garage. The car will stay outside before that happens!

 

I've already got a fuse panel under the saddle, so no problem accessing fused power. A voltage converter should be easy to find on Digikey or Amazon. I wasn't too concerned about battery life (the opener itself will end up somewhere easily accessible); mostly I just wanted to prevent it from being operable when I'm not around the bike. Maybe overkill, since I will rarely park it right outside my house, and the button will be unlabeled and placed in a discreet location. Will cogitate further...

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I've had my standard garage door opener hooked on the wires/cables directly under the left side of the handlebar for five years. It's been through all the weather to the point of dripping water out of it and still works fine. No need to reinvent the wheel

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The RT has a handy lockable compartment. I velcroed my opener to the underside. Click the button to open compartment, push garage door opener, close lid. Can be locked for security if needed.

 

DSC01660_zpscfggqeku.jpg

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Here, an easy view of where my garage door opener is located. You can see it just behind the upper dirty portion of the fork. That's where it stays 24/7 rain or shine with no issues at all.

 

19154814502_7d254505b0_b.jpg

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Here, an easy view of where my garage door opener is located. You can see it just behind the upper dirty portion of the fork. That's where it stays 24/7 rain or shine with no issues at all.

 

Well it is bound to be fine just there with the bike in that state!

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If you have to go to that much trouble to get to it, I'd just as soon leave the bike outside...

 

Ya, but from experience, I've managed to streamline the time it takes to get to it ;)

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Powering an opener from the bike means that you will need to drop the voltage from twelve volts to three volts, and add a fused circuit.

 

Many remotes are 12 volts, and certainly generic remotes are 12 volts, why would you have to drop the voltage? Having the extra zip of a fully charged bike battery does give you good range.

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Powering an opener from the bike means that you will need to drop the voltage from twelve volts to three volts, and add a fused circuit.

 

Many remotes are 12 volts, and certainly generic remotes are 12 volts, why would you have to drop the voltage? Having the extra zip of a fully charged bike battery does give you good range.

 

Evening Edgar

 

 

What kind of battery or batteries are they using to get 12 volts?

 

Most of my newer openers are 9 volts (9 volt battery).

 

I have a real old one that used (2) 1.5v batteries.

 

 

 

 

 

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In the last two years I have installed 3 garage door openers at family members houses, 2 of them were genies, a one was a lift master. All of them had standard 12 volt battery remotes. The old lift master that I have also has a 12 volt battery.

 

Generic 12 volt remotes that work with most openers are available.

 

Here are some examples:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003IG7TQ6/ref=sr_ph?ie=UTF8&qid=1438216922&sr=1&keywords=garage+openers+remote

 

http://www.amazon.com/Skylink-69-Universal-Garage-Control/dp/B000Q5VKJE/ref=sr_1_50?ie=UTF8&qid=1438217416&sr=8-50&keywords=garage+openers+remote#productDetails

 

http://www.northshorecommercialdoor.com/overhead-door--garage-door-opener-ocdt2-codedodger.html?utm_source=amazon&utm_medium=cse&SKU=--GITR-3

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szurszewski

I don't know anything about electricity but the internet told me I could wire my garage door opener into my wife's Vespa. I did - used the hot and ground from an unused alarm prep connector. It's been in there eight years, operated by a push button on the dash, works great. Since it hasn't caught on fire and continues to work I assume the remote was/is 12v.

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