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Any reason to NOT step up to a 1200RT?


foundationapps

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foundationapps

I have a 98 1100RT hybrid, half police bike and half decommissioned. 44,000 miles. I got it at 37,000 miles. Other than pulling the relay to shut off the ABS dash light, I've replaced brake lines, relocated the fuel filter to external, unf***ed the HES setup, and waterproofed that, and am going to install SS brake lines.

 

Recently have been drawn to the newer 1200RT bikes. It's not about power, i'm fine with the 1100's muscle and how it handles.

 

Question: Why would I just not keep the 1100? Is there any compelling reason to get away from the 1100 and go to some form of the 1200? What years are best for the 1200?

 

Thank you all.

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Afternoon foundationapps

 

On the 1200RT vs the 1100RT, just go test ride a 1200RT, the difference & improvements will be VERY obvious.

 

As to years on the 1200RT, that depends on what you can afford. Early 1200RT's have some shortcomings but are still very nice bikes (good value right now). Later 1200 hexheads are better braking wise, & some drivetrain improvements (bit more money), later camheads have more improvements yet (still more money), new wetheads show improvements in a lot of areas but more money yet .

 

They will all feel like sports cars compared to your 1100RT.

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It's pretty subjective but I've always felt that the hexhead 1200 was a nice evolutionary improvement over the 1100 (kind of what the 1150 should have been, but wasn't), but nothing more than that and I was never really tempted to upgrade. That changed with the wethead incarnation which includes a lot of changes in the clutch and transmission along with a big increase in power and tractability, but of course a huge difference in price as well since it is so new. But back to the original question, I personally never felt compelled to move to the hexhead, but then again with the introduction of the wethead there are a lot of great bargains to be had among older 1200s so if they float your boat it's probably a good time to buy. Personally I'd avoid any early models with the servo brakes though.

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foundationapps

I can see the benefits. In the BMW shop near Salt Lake City, they have a 2013 1200. Good looking machine. Since I like to do my own maintenance and upkeep (though the learning curve can be interesting on the Beemer, are the 1200s roughly the same? Computer controlled stuff spooks me. I work on my 2003 Dodge Cummins all the time. BUT if everything goes to crap and I need something solid, I have a 1975 Ford F150 with a 6 cylinder 300 inline and a 4 speed manual gearbox. NO computer controlled anything in the truck. Manual points as well.

 

I might have to travel to SLC next weekend and ride one. Thanks for your insight.

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Camheads represent a great bargain right now and the few flaws (i.e. switchgear) have been addressed by BMW. They are way undervalued in the used market, which has recently been exasperated by BMW cutting the Wethead prices via the 2K promotion.

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The Rocketman

I have two R1200C's (an '02 Montana and an '04 Montauk). Last Summer I bought an '09 RT with 18,000 miles on it. These bikes are like night and day. Too many differences and benefits to discuss here, but after I got it (and to this day) I ask myself, "why didn't I get one of these things sooner?". This bike does everything well. Looks-wise, my R1200C's are still (in my opinion) one of the prettiest & unique looking bikes, but I've come to really, really, really like my new RT. Got it without servo brakes, so one less thing to worry about breaking later. I did add a boat-load of items and upgrades/improvements that were on my wish list, to it, that I bought during this rather long (and expensive :) ) winter, but now the bike is as perfect as I can get it. MBS (Multiple Bike Syndrome) is not a bad thing. Its easily justifiable (just tell your SO, "it's an investment" and enjoy both for different rides. You'll feel a little bit guilty leaving one bike behind in the garage, but you'll get over it.

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If you are happy with your bike, don't be pressured to upgrade...period. I did go from a 1150RT to the new wethead. The reasons I did it was because of a few things. I wanted a water cooled bike. Living in Houston, summer heat and stop and go traffic. I hated the dry clutch. I like having a modern radio system with Bluetooth, xm,weather, etc. It's piped through my helmet wirelessly including my cell phone. The main ingredient that kept me from buying a Multi-Strada was cruise control. Most of my riding is long periods of time. Cruise was a must and the Duc didn't have it. The wethead's ergo's are really different. You sit lower, the center of gravity is much lower, the bike has way more grunt and roll-on capability without having to keep the revs up, and is just an all around different generation of bike. It is way less top heavy than my 1150 was.

 

The wethead is expensive. For me, it was worth the upgrade, but as earlier stated, if you are happy with your bike, then keep on riding it. The 1100's and 1150's will always catch my eye and I wouldn't hesitate to ride one a 100k miles.

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szurszewski

Read your other thread about your 1100 - I'd think that woudl be reason enough to not "upgrade." The 1100 is definitely controlled by its computer, but the systems are pretty basic compared to the newer and newest bikes.

 

That said, if you can afford it, you should ride whatever makes you happy.

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I sold my 1150 and bought a 2014 r1200rt last year. I rode a K before buying the 1150. I missed the water cooling. I watched a couple of times that temperature gauge go up when in stuck traffic. It never over heated but made me concerned. I find myself agreeing with what Skywagon has written. I enjoy the Bluetooth. When working I must be able to be contacted by phone. I have the BMW com system and can ride the bike when working. I find the bike to be much better planted. I liked my 1150 and never thought I needed any more power or ability. It is a good bike. I am happier on the wet head but I was happy on the 1150. I hated the time or expense of some of the maintenance. All day to split the bike to lube spines. No issues now. If the 1200 had never been made with a water jacket I would still be on the 1150 or seriously thinking of a GTL.

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foundationapps

I found a nice blue and silver 2013 RT in SLC, plan on going there to TR it on Saturday. Also found a 90th Anniversary R1200RT on cycle trader. Me and that bike are tied at the soul!!! They color and layout are already what i'm looking for, being more attracted to greys and blacks than blues and silvers.

 

Anyone know anything about those bikes? Never heard of one before.

 

http://www.cycletrader.com/listing/2013-BMW-R-1200-RT-114605438

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Don't know about production numbers but saw a couple at dealerships, one practically new that owner parted with for a new Wethead. Personally I think 15K for any Camhead is way overpriced. Newest Blue Book shows used Wetheads less than that $, or at least that's what one dealer told me was the value on my 6,000 mile Wethead when I got GSA lust...which with my wife's "help" I got over. In any case if you're seriously considering spending 15K for a nice RT, you should focus on the used Wethead market IMO.

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The Rocketman

As per Fleabay, the anniversary RT sold for $13,600 yesterday.

eBay item number:

 

201348141533

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As per Fleabay, the anniversary RT sold for $13,600 yesterday.

eBay item number:

 

201348141533

 

And trade-in would be about 2K less than that. So, he did OK. Plus he got the return of seventeen thousand + miles. :thumbsup:

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Painted side cases.

My 96 has the flat black plastic cases. I love the! Motel doors nor hitting them with your boots on the upswing will scuff them. Can set them down anywhere, no worries. One less thing to have to continually wash and wax. When they do scuff a little, unlike a painted surface, it rubs out easily or can be sanded out with very fine sand paper.

Painted cases are simply just vanity over function, which BMW seems to adopting more and more.

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foundationapps

Had to add to my own question. Great weekend burning through Western Wyoming, into Colorado, if you're in the area, check out Colorado Hwy 139 through the Flaming Gorge and 141 that goes into SW Colorado. Some of the most spectacular riding I've seen in 40 years. Was stopped on the side of the road for a minute and no less than 20 Dodge Vipers, Hellcats and a Ferrari and Vette went burning through, bumper to bumper, the sound off the canyon walls was amazing.

 

Meat of the subject: Why upgrade to a 1200RT? Travelling through Salt Lake City interstate traffic, following the rule of being a little faster than traffic... a 1200 passed my by, the 1100 kept up with him, but I was pushing to do it. Tons of fun, he was a very skillful rider, working traffic with precision.

 

95% convinced to go with a 1200, question is what year?

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95% convinced to go with a 1200, question is what year?

 

Morning foundationapps

 

 

It kind of boils down to how much you want to spend?

 

A good (non oil leaking) 2005 is usually the best bang for the buck but you get wizzy brakes with that meal.

 

Good value right now seems to be the 2008/2009 1200RT as you get most of the updates as well as good (non wizzy) brakes & non-failing handlebar switches.

 

2010 up gives a slightly better running engine (unless compared to a worked-on (08/09), later good brakes, & a bit more modern bike but the cost is more & handlebar switches issues can be a pain in the a$$.

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And I wouldn't pass on a 2007. It was the first year without the whizzy breaks and the last year without the service indicator. DR has mentioned a few improvements that were made in subsequent years but I know mine hasn't seen a dealer except for recalls. Best and most reliable bike I've ever owned.

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markgoodrich

One reason not to do it is you'll spend more on gas. You'll go farther. Every one of the 1200 models has a group of bitchers. I had an 06 and put 85,000 or so miles on it, only things that ever went wrong were when I decided to take a look. I have a K1600GT now, and even after a year and a half I'm unsure I should have made the change. Well the GT is a whole, whole lot faster. There's that.

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Jeff in VA

No reason at all not to move sideways to an R1200RT. You might also consider moving up to an R1200GS.... :-)

 

 

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foundationapps

I've thought about that too. I like the extra mobility of the big GS. I've decided to keep the 1100RT, but it would be for different purposes. The new 1200 RT or GS would be for the long range stuff. I see yours is a brand new machine. Any complaints? What did you ride before?

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Jeff in VA

Zero complaints so far. My last bike an RT (bought back by BMW). Before that I had a K1600GT and 2 RTs before that. The RT is an outstanding bike. I was just ready for something different.

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  • 1 month later...
foundationapps

Update. Going to the local (250 miles) Beemer shop. They have an 09, 11, 13, 14 and of course 2015s to test ride. Going to ride a 13 GS ADV for the heck of it. Even if I buy nothing, I've go the Black Boil (my name for my 98 RT-P) to ride home on.

 

Does anyone have any insight on what to be guided by?

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Update. Going to the local (250 miles) Beemer shop. They have an 09, 11, 13, 14 and of course 2015s to test ride. Going to ride a 13 GS ADV for the heck of it. Even if I buy nothing, I've go the Black Boil (my name for my 98 RT-P) to ride home on.

 

Does anyone have any insight on what to be guided by?

Your heart.

 

Seriously, the one that trips your emotional trigger. Don't try to complete an exhaustive rational analysis of the choices -- that is your brain trying to rationalize something that doesn't matter to your long-term happiness with your choice.

 

And having an '04 RT-P, a '12 RT and a '15 RT, I would perfectly understand if your '98 RT-P was still "the one." :thumbsup:

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Sailorlite

One reason not to step up to the RT is that you find you prefer the overall experience of that 13 GS ADV to the RT, or in addition to the RT.

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I totally agree about your assessment of Colorado Hwy 139 !! A great ride! After seeing Gateway resort I thought about going back to stay, but after calling and discovering the rates were in the $500/night range I changed my mind. So now I'm curious ... how does Hwy 141 compare?

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foundationapps

As I recall, 139 was a different bit of road. High altitude pass on a pretty beat up 2 laner. Light traffic, but gotta watch the switchback corners. Much shorter duration for great view also. 141 being through the canyons and into / around Gateway is flatter, but more spectacular. Canyon walls are very close to the shoulderless road at times. Fair amount of 4 wheeler traffic, but they were all pretty switched on. No one wandered the center lane.

 

I'd tip my hat to 141 being a better, longer, and spectacular ride. Even running west into southern Utah on US Hwy 491 after going through Slide Rock on 141 is pretty cool. North into Moab was great, but the closer you get to Moab, the more the roads are over run by encased 4 wheelers.... yes, all on their smartphones to make sure they don't get anxiety attacks or withdrawals from not checking the facebook page every 10 seconds... just my observation :)

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