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Fuel Supply Line to Injector - SNAPPED


MontanaBud

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I began the process of drawing back the air pipe to the left throttle body in order to replace the cam chain tensioner. I disconned the top holder for the injector, and suddenly the hard plastic line to the top of the injector holder snapped off in my hand.

 

Is this as horrible as I suspect?

 

 

2004 R1150RT - 99K mi.

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Hello, Bud -

 

I just finished replacing my fuel distributor last Jan. Not a classic repair thread but here it is: *Thread*

It was titled "Oil Leak" because that's what I thought it was at first.

I think the venerable DR talked about some people repairing the broken plastic tube with a short length of fuel hose. Problem is, as I understand it, there are no barbs or flares on the plastic tube so hard to hold the fuel line on.

A patch is tempting because the job is so much easier that way. In your case the patch would at least be visible and repairable if it leaks.

 

To replace the whole fuel distributor you must lift the rear frame because the plastic tubes go under it. You also have to remove the battery box. The brake controller is on top of the battery box & has to come out. The fuel dist. is under all that. Big job.

 

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Damn, that is sorry news for me. :cry:

 

Where did you find the replacement parts? I see the distributor and regulator, and o-rings. Do the lines and FI holders come with the distributor part? Part # 01 13 53 7664857 ??

 

Chris Harris had a video once that showed how to lift the rear, but now I can't find it. I may actually have to read my Climer's manual. :P

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Bud - maybe this will help. It's from Maxbmw fiche. Click on it for a larger image.

th_Fuel%20Dist_zpsqm8darti.png

Part labeled #1 comes with both arms attached & the fittings that receive the fuel injectors and the parts that screw on to the throttle bodies. (Also includes the plastic fuel intake and return lines.)

 

Clymer is scattered and may help but it said you have to remove the transmission which I found to be unnecessary.

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Just to reinforce what has been said...there is no easy repair to the tubing. This is best thought of as a replacement job. You may have noticed the end of the tubing has a metal insert that will take the clamping pressure. Without the insert the plastic line will crush under the force of the hose clamp. Inserting the metal insert into the remaining tubing should be considered more of a "get me home" maneuver.

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Morning MontanaBud

 

Exactly where did the line break? They usually bend & kink, not snap off, unless it snapped right at the injector connector.

 

There have been a few that have replaced the pressure regulator (that has the plastic lines permanently attached) without removing the air box but that involves bending & distorting the lines so it is a very risky attempting to do it that way.

 

We have a tool at work that is used to repair plastic fuel lines by holding the plastic line then forcing in a "repair" barbed fitting. A lot of auto dealers have the same type (or similar type) tool so IF you have a length of plastic to work with on each end or the break then m-a-y-b-e it can be repaired with a proper plastic fuel line repair tool.

 

The downside here is--IF your line snapped off it is probably brittle from fuel additives & numerous heating/cooling cycles.

 

If you have a friendly auto dealer nearby then maybe take the broken end in to them & see if they have a repair tool & connector that will fit your line. (if your line is broken right at the injector fitting then no repair would be possible

unless you cut your line back then cut the injector end off of another fuel rail & make the splice farther from the injector end.

 

In any case, I don't know what the line ID is & how brittle your plastic lines are so a repair is just a suggestion on something to look into not a for-sure repair option.

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The fuel line snapped like a pretzel right at the junction with the carriage wall,where a rubber donut is mounted, so I'm slowly beginning to accept that replacement is likely necessary.

 

Is a new fuel pressure regulator also necessary?

 

What do you think about Twinsig's suggestion about lubing the splines? At 99k, should also I plan on replacing the clutch while in there? What if I find warped splines?

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I'd look into getting a low-mile used driveshaft. I'd also replace the rear pivot bearings. It's a good time to do a little PM, so I'd also replace all the fuel lines and the brakes lines. This may be a blessing in disguise.

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What do you think about Twinsig's suggestion about lubing the splines? At 99k, should also I plan on replacing the clutch while in there? What if I find warped splines?

 

Morning MontanaBud

 

I haven't ever been a big believer in LUBRICATING the splines doing any good. If they are aligned & meshing properly they shouldn't ever need to be lubricated. If they are not aligned properly then a little lubrication won't last a 1000 miles.

 

But I do believe that at 99K it would not be a bad idea to inspect the splines (but, if they went 99k without issue they are probably aligned & working good as is)

 

The upside of inspecting/lubricating the splines is-- you can get an educated judgment of spline wear & clutch condition.

 

The down side of removing the trans to inspect the splines & clutch is-- If you can't somehow mark & reinstall the trans input shaft back into the clutch disk in the very same clocking as it has been operating, then you risk a mismatch of spline engagement & that can lead to quicker spline wear as they re-seat back into full contact.

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MontanaBud wrote:

Is a new fuel pressure regulator also necessary?

Good question. When I did mine I replaced it because I didn't want to ever again have to get in there!

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Is a new fuel pressure regulator also necessary?

 

Morning MontanaBud

 

Yes, pretty well so as the lines & regulator come as an assembly.

Check Flea-Bay for used pressure regulators as most come from running parted-out bikes.

 

fuel%20press%20regulator_zpsbn79ep8w.jpg

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Is it possible to lift the tail and remove the airbox and fuel distributor without touching the swingarm assembly?

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Is it possible to lift the tail and remove the airbox and fuel distributor without touching the swingarm assembly?

 

Morning MontanaBud

 

 

Yes, the swing arm can stay attached to the trans & final drive as you remove air box.

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Boxer Dry Clutch Check & Service:-

 

The fact that BMW has made the hardly-announced change to a Chinese-outsourced WET clutch in all their radically-redesigned new series of Boxer-engined bikes is sufficient proof that their traditional single-plate, back-to-front, Austin Mini-style dry clutch was well past its sell-by date and to boot, a concept of variable reliability which Berlin-Spandau persevered with for far, far too long in order to maintain their scandalous level of profit margin.

 

The consensus is that '02 vintage Boxers in particular suffered more frequently from 'soft' gearbox input splines and friction plate hub splines, as well as slight mis-alignment issues between engine casting and clutch bell-housing, which combined to ensure that clutch plates and splines tended to fail relatively quickly.

 

But many other Boxer and K-series bike transmissions of the same design happily soldier on through hundreds of Ks of miles with no apparent serious problems or sudden failures.

 

Nevertheless, despite what DirtRider says, in my opinion an annual clutch check and lube / service carried out on all dry-clutch BMW bikes is to be recommended, not only to ensure longevity of the transmission but also for the peace of mind of competent DIY biker-mechanics.

 

See these Chris Harris Clutch Check and Service videos:-

 

1) Check the clutch plate to Input Shaft Splines rate of wear; 4 min video:-

 

https://youtu.be/dw6xP7a4EfM

 

2) See how the remedial work is carried out; 42 min video:-

 

https://youtu.be/HymmP34ipOA

 

AL in s.e. Spain

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Hi MontanaBud,

It may be worth contacting Keith ( member name OoPEZoO)

He was parting out a bike an may have one of these available (if it is compatible).

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