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Dropped it for the second time!


Dave Parry

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I've had the R1100RT for about five years now and this is the second time i've done it, exactly the same scenario, moving off from rest with a fair amount of right lock on and not quite enough revs, engine stalls and down she goes. No damage apart from scratches on cylinder head and mirror pod and no injuries. I think I might dig the old R80RT and go back to using that especially for local running around, it's just so much more nimble and controllable at low speed and in slightly confined spaces. I do like the comfort and performance of the 1100 (especially on my fairly regular journeys from Kent to Exeter) so much and did do my IAM test on it which includes all the slow riding stuff and machine control days but am now starting to lose a bit of confidence!

 

 

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szurszewski

You could put on a sidecar :)

 

Seriously, I'm sure there are folks on here who've gone their whole lives without ever dropping a bike - or having any character flaws - but twice in five years isn't horrible (he said, to make himself feel better).

 

Are you sure it was you and not the bike? It's not uncommon for the aging wiring coming from the controls to have issues at full lock - might want to try putting the bike on the center stand and, while it's running, move the bars firmly from lock to lock and see if that causes a stall...

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You know precisely what led to the two drops so now you need to use that focus to retrain yourself to be vigilant when starting out. Eventually the correct procedure will become second nature.

 

You might want to consider using the fast idle lever "the choke" to raise your idle rpms when you find yourself in a tricky situation, i.e. steep incline from a parking lot to the street.

 

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Bill_Walker

Don't start from a stop with a lot of right lock on, I'd say. I had the same problem with my RT. It's a situation where you have an awkward reach to the clutch lever, and even if you don't stall it, if the front tire hits a pebble before you get moving, it can knock you down.

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Dave, I'm convinced that dropping a bike is like having a computer failure: there are those this has happened to, and those it hasn't yet happened to.

 

I'm 5'6" (168 cm) tall, and weigh a little over 150 pounds. I'm also approaching 69, and I realize that neither my reflexes nor my strength are what they used to be, so I try to make accommodations to reality. A R100RT is a lot of mass to maneuver, especially for a small person at slow speeds.

 

I took the MSF Experienced Rider's course about 6 months ago, and failed the tight maneuvering part miserably. In the real world, it's OK to put a foot down when necessary. The humiliation is still fresh in my mind, but on the other hand, I am more aware of skills that need more practice.

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Patient, "Doctor it hurts when I move my arm like this."

Doctor, "Don't move your arm like that."

 

Happens.

Like he said, you know why so be prepared, or work around.

Best wishes.

 

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Hi Dave, sorry to hear about your 'drop'.

My comments may come as a little unsympathetic, but they are not meant to be destructive.

You say you have done the IAM course: Low speed handling requires revs and clutch control and it seems you are omiting revs.

May I suggest you stick with the RT but just ensure you keep the revs up at low speeds.

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Dave,

My 2nd drop story might make you feel better.

After the first drop, I swore it would never happen to me again. It was such a weird feeling of all the worlds weight pushing down on me the first time.

Felt that feeling again (both times I was stopped but leaned the bike over too far). The second time my instinct recognized the weight and I said no way am I dropping it... then snap... hamstring... and the bike went over anyway. Went into partial shock because of the pain and probably embarrassed. Couple guys had to lift me onto my bike because I still had to ride 200 miles to get home.

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It's always worse when injuries are involved isn't it Bigfish.

That must have been some ordeal for you, having to ride 200 miles with all that pain, hope the hamstring has healed ok now.

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Happened back in 2009. Healed up fine.

I do remember how awful I rode that last 200 miles. Strange how the mind works and thinks differently when endorphins are called into action. No fun riding in pain, especially when you don't know how the heck you are going to get off the bike when you stop. Moral of the story.... just step away and let the bike drop.

Hasn't happened since then... knock on wood.

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I've managed to just "step off" mine on both occasions and just let the bike lay down on the cylinder head as I know that once it gets past a few degrees from the vertical at 0 mph there's no way of stopping it going down! The first time a couple of passing people helped me pick it up but this time as there was no one around I had to use the method taught by the IAM course. Standing with back to the bike, left hand on handlebar and right hand under seat push back with feet and pull up, first time I've tried it but it worked well. It's ok as long as the bike goes down on right side as the prop stand can be put down to prevent bike going too far and over the other way, it would be quite tricky if it went down on it's left hand side though.

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I've managed to just "step off" mine on both occasions and just let the bike lay down on the cylinder head as I know that once it gets past a few degrees from the vertical at 0 mph there's no way of stopping it going down! The first time a couple of passing people helped me pick it up but this time as there was no one around I had to use the method taught by the IAM course. Standing with back to the bike, left hand on handlebar and right hand under seat push back with feet and pull up, first time I've tried it but it worked well. It's ok as long as the bike goes down on right side as the prop stand can be put down to prevent bike going too far and over the other way, it would be quite tricky if it went down on it's left hand side though.

 

No problem, just flip it over to the right side and pick it up again. (don't ask how I know)

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Had a left side drop last year (no speed). The Stooges couldn't have scripted it any better. I was changing oil, or topping it off. For some reason I needed to move the bike in middle of the job. I rocked it off the centerstand and rolled it over to the new spot. I thought I had the sidestand down...NOPE. Slow-mo horror scene. As oil was glugging out of the fill hole, I scrambled to right my baby. In the rush, I'm pretty sure I didn't utilize the IAM method, or any other ergonomically approved method. For added comic relief, as I struggled with it, I made sure to step in the oil puddle with my left foot AND step on the fill cap with my right foot (crushing it). The only bright spot was that I did not push it back over too far onto the right side. Taught the neighborhood kids some new words that day :grin:.

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Stan Walker

I had 4 bikes side by side on their center stands (one on a lift but only 7" off the ground). Tipped over the end one while taking it off the center stand and played Dominoes with the other 3 bikes. All 4 down with one still half on the lift and one just leaning into some metal cabinets but not quite to the floor. It took two of us to straighten up this mess I made.

 

End result, I broke the plug on the end of my battery charger. That was the only damage. That and my pride!

 

Stan

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Heehee

We had a possessed KTNMdirt bike (small displacement) in the dealership.

We had it because it threw the owner.

His dad, experienced rider, tried to kick start it and broke his leg.

Brought to us for sale.

We had it on stand.

End of day it came alive and toppled w/out any outside intervention.

Into the row of new bikes in the front, one, over, two, over three ( a new LT) over and out, through the large plate glass window. Of course in slow motion, and of course only me and the owner there.

If he hadn't been sitting at his desk and seen the whole thing not sure he would believe my version.

:grin:

Thank goodness for plywood.

One drop is bad, chain reactions are spiritual.

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Heehee

We had a possessed KTNMdirt bike (small displacement) in the dealership.

We had it because it threw the owner.

His dad, experienced rider, tried to kick start it and broke his leg.

Brought to us for sale.

We had it on stand.

End of day it came alive and toppled w/out any outside intervention.

Into the row of new bikes in the front, one, over, two, over three ( a new LT) over and out, through the large plate glass window. Of course in slow motion, and of course only me and the owner there.

If he hadn't been sitting at his desk and seen the whole thing not sure he would believe my version.

:grin:

Thank goodness for plywood.

One drop is bad, chain reactions are spiritual.

 

My guess is that the little bike just got tired of those big fancy bike picking on it.

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I dropped my '02 with the bars turned about half way. When I started off, the engine rpms didn't pick up like they normally do. I was fine, but my wife took a pretty good hit to the back of the head since I couldn't hold it, and she had no way to keep herself off the ground. Really scared me.

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That's what happened the first time I done it, i'd stopped for a cuppa and didn't bother with the cold start lever and the engine had obviously cooled off more than I expected! hope your wife is ok now.

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At 5'8" and 140lb plus nearly 68 years old I have dropped mine 5 times in similar circumstances.

I have learned a couple of things since having the RT. I have owned bikes for most of my life and raced dirt bikes but this bike needs a different approach.

1. At low speed keep your hand off the front brake.

2. Shift your body weight forward - lean forward.

3. The other guys are right about the steering.

4. Be in charge - the bloody bike knows if you are half hearted.

I haven't dropped mine for over a year now but am always aware, once it starts to go I have no chance of stopping it.

Hope this helps

Hutchie

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  • 3 weeks later...

I dropped Vader the night I brought her home. Stopped with my right foot right in some cat litter on the concrete, and it just ball-bearing rolled under my boot sole and over I went.

 

But she has the RTP crash bars so no harm done, except to my pride. I think I heard the old K laughing.

 

I use the front crash bars to stand her up and back her up while I push from the front, wheel barrow style. Once she's rolling I move my right hand (bike's left side) to the bars and steer. I leave the side stand down and if she gets squirrelly, set her down.

 

I don't mind to point her in the direction I'm headed before I throw a leg over.

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