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mneblett

Wethead clutch engagement point adjustment

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mneblett

I had been told that the only adjustment for the clutch engagement point is the star-wheel on the lever. As a person with moderate-size hands, even with the star-wheel at position 1 the clutch engagement point is farther out than I would like. I found that the engagement point is, in fact, adjustable.

 

This pic shows an tiny (2 mm Allen) threaded rod at the end of the plunger/pushrod that pushes the clutch master cylinder piston when the clutch lever is pulled in (in this pic, the end of the screw is just in front of the high beam switch):

 

IMG_0854_zpsjom0ukfv.jpg

 

Underneath the tiny threaded rod is another tiny (2 mm Allen) set screw that locks the plunger threaded rod in place:

 

FullSizeRender_zpsubqa8ajg.jpg

 

The set screw is red loctited in place. Back the set screw out a turn or so (you may need some heat to weaken the red loctite, but I didn't), then turn the plunger rod end to move the clutch engagement point in or out (IIRC, counterclockwise to move in the engagement point). Don't forget to re-tighten the set screw.

 

HTH!

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mountainmann

Thanks for posting. I wonder if there is a spec for how far the clutch engagement point is supposed to be from the grip?

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mneblett

No idea, but my K16 was set to about the same distance from the factory.

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David Littlefield

Thanks, I'm going to try that. I was able to make an improvement by grinding the nose of the lever adapter piece a little where it bears against the adjusting wheel.

 

http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/attachments/rt-series/71617d1420554455t-014-rtw-clutch-lever-adjustment-mod-clutch2.jpg

http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/attachments/rt-series/71625d1420554455t-014-rtw-clutch-lever-adjustment-mod-clutch1.jpg

6472.jpg.273107c9d7d00e8f4e4a02a0eff1e67c.jpg

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mneblett

Correction: the tiny Allen size is 1.5 mm, not 2 mm as stated above.

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Stooie

To revive a thread from three years ago; has this fix stood the test of time? Has it been widely adopted with no undesired side effects such as compromising the micro-switch for the cruise control?

 

I test rode a 2018 RT a few weeks ago and was very impressed. The light feel rolling into a turn is truly delightful. My '15 FJR is in almost all ways a wonderful bike but it is top heavy, which can be problematic when stopped, and it doesn't flow into a turn the way the RT does.

 

Having said that, I was astonished at how high the friction zone was on the RT. More than once while starting from rest I was surprised enough that nothing was happening as I let out the clutch that I glanced down to see if I'd inadvertently shifted into neutral.

 

Ride long and prosper!

 

Bob Stewart

Salem, Oregon

 

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dirtrider
To revive a thread from three years ago; has this fix stood the test of time? Has it been widely adopted with no undesired side effects such as compromising the micro-switch for the cruise control?

 

I test rode a 2018 RT a few weeks ago and was very impressed. The light feel rolling into a turn is truly delightful. My '15 FJR is in almost all ways a wonderful bike but it is top heavy, which can be problematic when stopped, and it doesn't flow into a turn the way the RT does.

 

Having said that, I was astonished at how high the friction zone was on the RT. More than once while starting from rest I was surprised enough that nothing was happening as I let out the clutch that I glanced down to see if I'd inadvertently shifted into neutral.

 

Ride long and prosper!

 

Bob Stewart

Salem, Oregon

 

Afternoon Bob

 

That screw is Loc-Tited for a reason.

 

Turning the screw in can cause the internal piston to not uncover the tiny take-up port hole so eventually the clutch circuit will either run out of enough internal fluid or it could allow the trapped fluid to expand then not allow complete clutch engagement (ie clutch slipping). (never turn the screw in any farther)

 

Turning the screw out will move the lever to engagement point closer to the grip but that is at the expense of a possible non-complete clutch dis-engagement during a shift, or clutch drag with cold thick engine oil, or could cause a drag with an over-worked over-heated clutch (just understand the down side of messing with that screw).

 

 

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Stooie

D.R.:

 

Howdy. Thanks for the response. I agree that most things that are adjustable have tolerances to be maintained. I wonder if the tolerances are published in the maintenance pubs somewhere that would allow optimization of the friction zone position while remaining within the specified adjustment tolerances.

 

Have fun, ride safe,

Bob Stewart

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dirtrider
D.R.:

 

Howdy. Thanks for the response. I agree that most things that are adjustable have tolerances to be maintained. I wonder if the tolerances are published in the maintenance pubs somewhere that would allow optimization of the friction zone position while remaining within the specified adjustment tolerances.

 

Have fun, ride safe,

Bob Stewart

 

Evening Bob

 

That is a non-serviceable area so there are no specifications published that I know of anyhow.

 

You can teak that screw a little but keep in mind what I wrote above. If you start moving the friction point towards the bar (using that screw) you will start losing clutch plate separation at full lever pull. Might not be a problem if you only move it a little, or might be a problem that only shows up when you get the clutch hot, or oil is very cold, or as clutch plates wear.

 

If you do move that screw keep close track of how much you move it so you can put it back if needed.

 

 

 

 

 

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Stooie

D. R.:

 

Your point is noted and well taken. For 40 years I worked for a helicopter OEM. I'm very sensitive to how much effort an OEM puts into establishing a configuration with its tolerances and maintenance procedures.

 

At the same time, I'm a little surprised that the user community hasn't pursued this a bit more. If this bike had a cable-actuated clutch there would be a procedure and tolerance for adjusting it. It appears that adjusting this screw is external to the hydraulic system and should serve the same function.

 

The friction zone on the RT I rode seemed to be in the top 15 or 20% of the lever travel. Other users have commented on this as did Tom Roderick in his otherwise very complimentary 2014 Motrocycle.com review of the RT. The questions this leaves me with are:

 

1. Are all Wet Head RTs like this, or is it just some who happen to be at this end of the manufacturing tolerance?

2. Given that most of the rest of the motorcycle world has the clutch friction zone closer to lever mid-travel, what drove BMW to this choice?

 

Ain't life interesting? Have fun, ride safe.

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Bernie

Bob, my 2018 RT took some time to get used to the engagement point of the clutch, compared to the 2007 RT I rode before.

But after 10K miles I am getting used to it.

The dealer did check the clutch fluid level and lowered it a little too the Max fill point.

It was only slightly over filled, but he did tell me that some have been over filled by the factory.

That did make a difference.

Your Demo model may also have too much clutch fluid.

 

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1940

I would have much better slow speed and take off control if the engagement point was closer to the handle bars. I have small hands and seems I'm revving the motor more than I should on take off.

 

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AndyS

Can't you just change the reach point of the lever with the rotary knob? That really does get the lever close to the bars.

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dirtrider
Can't you just change the reach point of the lever with the rotary knob? That really does get the lever close to the bars.

 

Morning Andy

 

Yes, that is the designated place to change the lever position to engagement point as that keeps the pushrod to piston position in the correct working position for all wear & conditions.

 

On the old hexhead bikes there was one unusable position on the little adjustment knob (BMW blocked that position as it didn't allow enough clutch dis-engagement under some conditions)

 

We would remove the adjustment barrel & use a Dremel to grind the blocking tab away so we could use the 0 position to move the lever closer to the bar (it worked on some most of the time but didn't always give good clean clutch release on a hot clutch or during shifting)-- Probably reason BMW blocked that position. The good part about using the modified rotary barrel was that any problems were QUICKLY put back to normal by just rotating the adjustment barrel back to the factory #1 position.

 

I think on the 1200 wethead that all positions are usable so no unused position to modify.

 

The proper way to do any lever position adjustments on the wethead would be to grind a little off the closest position porch on the adjuster barrel as that keeps proper pushrod to piston out-stop position BUT I don't think the wethead adjuster barrel is available for replacement so if the ground position doesn't work out they lose the factory close position & a replacement lever is expensive.

 

 

 

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Stooie

Thank you all for your thoughtful and illuminating responses.

 

Bernie: I am at a complete loss to understand how reservoir fluid level would affect the engagement level but glad to hear it has some impact. Who knew?

 

1940/Bob: Although I'm 6' 2" I have only middlin' size hands. On my test ride I suffered exactly the effects you described. Although adjusting the levers (which I did on the brake but not the clutch) might help, the fact that the engagement is at the very top of the travel is still counter-intuitive to me.

 

Bernie: Your experience reminds me of the old aphorism, "What you can, change; what you can't change, endure." On the one hand we humans are pretty adaptable, on the other hand the engineer in me wants to adjust it to make it "just right" for me.

 

D. R.: Should I ignore your wise advice to leave well enough alone, you better believe I'll take your incredibly good advice to count the turns I make to know how to return to the original setting!

 

Thanks again, all.

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Green RT

My impression is that BMW motorcycles have always had the clutch engagement point out near the end of lever travel. I prefer it that way. It may take getting used to when starting from a stop, but it means that for gear changes when moving, you just barely have to move the clutch lever.

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Bernie

Also keep in mind that 1st gear is taller and requires more clutch slip and revs to launch then the older HexHead.

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Lone_RT_rider
Also keep in mind that 1st gear is taller and requires more clutch slip and revs to launch then the older HexHead.

 

And the Hexhead required more clutch slip than the Oilhead (R1100RT). Pretty soon you'll have to get a rolling start just to get the thing into gear. It will be almost like running at Bonneville.

 

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alegerlotz
Also keep in mind that 1st gear is taller and requires more clutch slip and revs to launch then the older HexHead.

 

I don't find that to be the case with my 2016 RT vs my prior 2005 RT.

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Bernie
Also keep in mind that 1st gear is taller and requires more clutch slip and revs to launch then the older HexHead.

 

I don't find that to be the case with my 2016 RT vs my prior 2005 RT.

 

Sorry to have replied to this thread.

Personally I think the new WetHead Transmissions are a pile of junk.

Waiting for mine to explode, so it can be replaced under warranty.

 

 

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alegerlotz
Also keep in mind that 1st gear is taller and requires more clutch slip and revs to launch then the older HexHead.

 

I don't find that to be the case with my 2016 RT vs my prior 2005 RT.

 

Sorry to have replied to this thread.

Personally I think the new WetHead Transmissions are a pile of junk.

Waiting for mine to explode, so it can be replaced under warranty.

 

 

I don't find my transmission to be a pile of junk compared to my 2005 either.

 

That being said, my 2016 and your 2018 have different transmissions... The 2017+ trans was supposed to be an improvement. It sounds like that might not be the case.

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Mudman

Sorry to hear Bernies RT isn't up to expectations. I would check the simple stuff first. Some wethead bikes have had the clutch master cylinder overfilled from the factory. This problem is increased as the clutch wears the fluid level rises. Draw off any excess mineral oil to a level shown in the owner manual.

 

Just the opposite experience with the transition from my 14 GSA to the 2018 RT. The GSA was not a problem shifter.

 

The new RT is much better at gear shifts and approaches the same smooth action as my S1000XR that is the best shifting bike I have owned. The 18 RT is the best gear box of the 7 boxer twins I have had the pleasure to own.

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roger 04 rt
Also keep in mind that 1st gear is taller and requires more clutch slip and revs to launch then the older HexHead.

 

I noticed the same thing. Compared to my R1150 running with an LC-1, I felt it took fairly high revs to get it going. After installing a pair of AF-XIEDs (initially to test Nightrider's RAM module that fixes the AF-XIED-to-Wethead cold start problem) and running on setting 7, I needed almost no revs above idle to get going in first gear.

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AndyS

Personally I think the new WetHead Transmissions are a pile of junk.

 

 

 

Why is that Bernie?

I have found my 2017 gearbox to be the best BMW gearbox I have ever used (1100, 1150 Oilheads, 1200Hexhead, Camhead and early Wetheads).I still hate engagement into 1st gear when the engine is warm though!

 

 

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Bernie

Personally I think the new WetHead Transmissions are a pile of junk.

 

 

 

Why is that Bernie?

I have found my 2017 gearbox to be the best BMW gearbox I have ever used (1100, 1150 Oilheads, 1200Hexhead, Camhead and early Wetheads).I still hate engagement into 1st gear when the engine is warm though!

 

 

The warmer or hotter the bike and gearbox gets, the worse the shifting gets.

Maybe the oil is too thin or maybe not enough oil is moving fast enough, or maybe the oil is foaming too much. I don't know.

All I know when the bike is cold it is smooth as soft butter. When it hot, I mean really hot, it starts shifting erratic and in consistent.

It probably will get better with more miles as clearances are getting bigger.

 

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Bernie

Could it have anything to do with the engine oil level?

Mine is just a hair above the top of the red circle.

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Stooie

 

 

 

 

The warmer or hotter the bike and gearbox gets, the worse the shifting gets.

 

 

Gee; that sure sounds like oil viscosity is part of the equation. Do you notice if the bike shifts any better immediately after doing an oil change (i.e., before there's any slight viscosity degradation with use)? Without meaning to side track the discussion into a dreaded oil thread, it might be worth experimenting with different brands of oil to determine if that has any effect.

 

It might also be worth draining an ounce or two of oil out to get the level down into the red circle to see if that makes a difference.

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Bernie

 

 

 

The warmer or hotter the bike and gearbox gets, the worse the shifting gets.

 

 

Gee; that sure sounds like oil viscosity is part of the equation. Do you notice if the bike shifts any better immediately after doing an oil change (i.e., before there's any slight viscosity degradation with use)? Without meaning to side track the discussion into a dreaded oil thread, it might be worth experimenting with different brands of oil to determine if that has any effect.

 

It might also be worth draining an ounce or two of oil out to get the level down into the red circle to see if that makes a difference.

 

I will have to try different brands of oil. But it doesn't matter if it's fresh oil or not.

The problem has been since day one and the bike has over 10K miles on it now.

I will try to lower the oil level, but understand that the dealer has been changing the oil.

I have been mainly doing this to make sure the dealer and BMW will cover the bike under warranty.

It is not a oil problem, it is either electronic or due to clutch problems.

 

Lowering the fluid level in the clutch reservoir did improve drastically.

 

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AndyS

Lowering the fluid level in the clutch reservoir did improve drastically.

 

 

???How? The reservoir is just that...a reservoir, so if there is 2mm or 12mm of fluid amove the inlet port, the amount that gets pumped is exactly the same.

Edited by AndyS

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Bernie

Lowering the fluid level in the clutch reservoir did improve drastically.

 

 

???How? The reservoir is just that...a reservoir, so if there is 2mm or 12mm of fluid amove the inlet port, the amount that gets pumped is exactly the same.

 

Yes, I am sure you right. But they claim that is all they did, besides having it connected to the BMW Diagnostics.

Which could also mean some sort of programming or sensor problem.

But lowering the clutch fluid level to the Max indicator in the reservoir did improve up-shifting by using the clutch lever in the lower 3 gears.

Downshifting using the Shift Assist Pro.is the other problem with this transmission. But I think it be more a senor problem or software problem. Sometimes, and not as often as it used to be, when trying to downshift from 4th gear to 3rd gear using Shift Assist Pro the transmission locks up. It is like stepping on a solid peg, no movement at all in the shift lever.

Then I lift the foot and try again and it works most of the time. A few times I have to pull the clutch to get it to downshift. Then it will be fine again for who knows how many shifts. I can't duplicate when it will do it. I had it do it after riding for hours and as soon as 1/2 mile.

That is why I think it is a sensor or a communication problem between modules, either hardware or software.

 

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AndyS

Argh. Bernie, I feel your woe.

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Bernie
Argh. Bernie, I feel your woe.

 

I am learning to deal with it, Andy. I am also trying different tire pressures, because my tires are wearing way to fast in the center compared to my 2007 RT.

But that is all another story. LOL

 

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AndyS

Mine too. Scratching my head on this one.

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Bernie
Mine too. Scratching my head on this one.

 

Tires or transmission?

 

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Alfred02

 

 

The warmer or hotter the bike and gearbox gets, the worse the shifting gets.

 

 

My 2014 is exactly the same. Butter-smooth while it's cold and gets worse as it warms up. I have changed the engine oil to a very expensive oil which is true spec imported from Germany and it made zero difference.

Mine does excellent downshifts all day long, but its the up shift that seem to be temperature/viscosity temperamental. I am talking about using the Pro shift.

The bike will shift just fine in mountainous terrain with lots of sweepers and aggressive riding, it's in town where trying to use Pro shift its no good. I have succumb to the fact that in town I am better of using the clutch lever for shifting.

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Alfred02

Just to confuse the subject even more.

While my bike had a service done, they gave me a 1200RS (wethead) demo bike as a loaner. It was one of the first in the country.

That bike shifted absolutely perfect using shift pro. It didn't matter if the bike was cold/warm/hot, shifting was absolute perfect...even in town.

On that bike you used the clutch lever just once....starting of from standstill.

I thought that they had sorted it now and that mine being the first wethead out, still had some small kinks in it as you do seem to get with the first run of a new model range.

So I am a bit surprised that a 2018 model still seems to suffer from the original problem.

That makes me speculate that the design is good but the bikes are not within the design spec, either on parts tolerance or during the assembly.

The clunking from neutral into first gear is also a bit annoying. My wife's bike that uses a wetclutch as well and which costs less then a third of my RT doesn't clunk at all....LOL

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Mudman

This might be a micro switch problem in your clutch perch. If the switch doesn't signal the clutch is fully released the shift pro is disabled because the system thinks you are manually shifting. The operation of this and the clutch interrupt switch can be easily checked with a GS 911 in the engine real time values list.

 

I had similar issues with my XR when I switched to an aftermarket clutch lever.. The problem was remedied with a micro switch adjustment.

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Bernie
This might be a micro switch problem in your clutch perch. If the switch doesn't signal the clutch is fully released the shift pro is disabled because the system thinks you are manually shifting. The operation of this and the clutch interrupt switch can be easily checked with a GS 911 in the engine real time values list.

 

I had similar issues with my XR when I switched to an aftermarket clutch lever.. The problem was remedied with a micro switch adjustment.

 

Thank you for your reply.

I will try to check that this coming weekend. It makes the most sense I have heard so far.

 

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AndyS
Mine too. Scratching my head on this one.

 

Tires or transmission?

Tyres. For the most part I ride this bike more sedately than my 1150 and it 'seems' to eat tyres quicker. and certainly the 'sweet spot' with newer tyres disappears quicker.

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Dave_in_TX

There are reports on advrider.com of people who have had problems due to messing with that adjustment.

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1940

I've got 63,000 on my 2017 RT and I still have problems releasing the clutch, especially if I'm in tight awkward almost stopped positions where I need to feather the clutch. I might try backing out the screw one turn to see if it makes a difference.

Bob

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Ron-M

I am glad others have the same opinion that I have concerning the clutch engagement.  I wish it were closer to the bars.  I am having a difficult time getting used to it being so far forward, especially in first gear.  I find myself over revving the engine more times than not when starting from a stopped position.   

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1940

I tried the adjustment of turning it in and out. didn't see any difference so put it back. I'm wondering if a different clutch lever would make a difference?

 

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dirtrider
17 minutes ago, 1940 said:

I tried the adjustment of turning it in and out. didn't see any difference so put it back. I'm wondering if a different clutch lever would make a difference?

 

Afternoon Bob

 

Yes, a clutch lever with more of a dip in it's center, or with a different geometry, could help your engagement point (if a different one is even available for the wethead).   But, you are then back to the possibly not getting a full clutch release with a hot clutch or with cold oil.

 

The piston in the clutch master cylinder needs to move a certain distance to achieve full clutch release under all riding conditions. If the  low spot in the clutch lever contacts the grip now & the release point is still too far out then even a new lever with a different contour will probably be about the same.  

 

About your only gain with a different lever might be that it fits your hand position better at the engagement point.  

 

If you could find a new lever (assembly)  with a different pivot point vs piston apply point then you might be able to get a closer engagement point  with the trade-off of a slightly higher clutch lever pull. My guess is this would not be possible due to the design of the BMW clutch master cylinder & the lack of enough demand  to make a total re-design cost effective for anyone to produce. 

 

 

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AndyS
On 6/26/2018 at 3:27 AM, Bernie said:

The dealer did check the clutch fluid level and lowered it a little too the Max fill point.

That did make a difference.

 

Are you sure?

 

Did he explain how that makes a difference?

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dirtrider
28 minutes ago, AndyS said:

 

Are you sure?

 

Did he explain how that makes a difference?

Afternoon Andy

 

If the hydraulic clutch reservoir is filled to about the correct level then  lowering the level more will make no difference. 

 

On the other hand, if the reservoir is overfilled then there is little or no air space above the fluid in the reservoir so it won't allow total pressure drop in the slave cylinder & hydraulic line at a released-clutch-lever.

 

About the only time I have seen them overfull is after a clutch, or clutch fluid, service & the tec overfills the reservoir thinking that is a good thing (or doesn't know there is a max level & that it is NOT the top of the reservoir). In fact it is a bad thing on the BMW hydraulic clutch as the fluid level in the reservoir actually increases as the clutch wears so the fluid level as-set  needs to be lower to allow for that fluid level increase as the clutch wears.

 

There is a rubber baffle/bellows under the reservoir cover that sort of prevents grossly overfilling & does allow some expansion room but if that is forced in on an overfull reservoir then the  little expansion protection provided is taken up as the clutch wears  & the fluid level increases into that expansion area. 

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Bernie
2 hours ago, AndyS said:

 

Are you sure?

 

Did he explain how that makes a difference?

I had a very difficult time to get adjusted to the WetHead. I had ridden all my life on dry clutch bikes. Moto Guzzi’s, OilHead (100+K), HexHead (183K). So the switch to the WetHead and wet clutch caused a lot of problems for me. And of course everyone told me that I was doing it all wrong all the time and I had to relearn how to ride a bike with a manual transmission. LOL

The bike shifts very smooth when cold, the problems are all when it gets a hot.

I think the reason he lowered the fluid level was that, as the fluid warms up, it will expand. Or he just made it up.

The second thing I did after talking to a service manager at another dealer, is to adjust the lever distance wheel to #4 setting, to increase the travel distance of the piston. He said that they had similar problems with the wet clutches on the Ducati and KTM bikes.

My problem is/was that when the bike got hot, the shifting gets worse.

I am now at 46,000 miles and it hasn’t not really improved. There are a few issues, that I have just learned to live with.

1. If you start it in gear, hot or cold, the bike will lurch forward, even when the clutch lever is fully actuated. So I always try to remember to actuate the brakes, before hitting the starter button.

2. Upshifting using the clutch from 2nd top 3rd or 3rd to 4 gear has always sloppy or you could feel the gears grinding/engaging. Not at all like on my old HexHead. 

To fix that problem, I have learned to shift at higher RPM’s and to only pull the clutch lever a tiny bit, 1/4”(inch) maybe.

So to up shift, I start lifting the gear lever and at that instance, I just pull the clutch lever a tiny bit and release it. And now it shifts smooth.

After reading a lot of posts on the German RT Forum and texting with a fellow, I think the problem is that the clearances in the clutch basket are not big enough to let the discs slide back and forth when everything gets hot. He had switched dealers and the master tech at the new dealer changed the clutch discs and basket and it fixed his problem. The tech told him that the slots in the basket are to skinny to allow the discs to move freely when the clutch lever is actuated. They covered it under warranty, but he never received any paperwork.

 Also it may very well be a problem with the clutch actuating shaft, as it expands due to heat, it may not have the proper leverage or travel distances.

At the moment, I am not ready to buy a complete new clutch system or basket to find out if I am wrong or right.

 

 

 

 

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Bernie
6 hours ago, Ron-M said:

I am glad others have the same opinion that I have concerning the clutch engagement.  I wish it were closer to the bars.  I am having a difficult time getting used to it being so far forward, especially in first gear.  I find myself over revving the engine more times than not when starting from a stopped position.   

Good afternoon @Ron-M and @1940.

When I changed from my HexHead to the WetHead, I would stall the bike and every demo bike I tried. It was like I was a total rookie.

After a few weeks of this, I installed the  “AF-XiED For LIQUID COOLED BMW R1200 BIKES - O2 Sensor Manipulator“ from BeemerBoneYard.com, . I don’t know if it fixed what was causing my problems or if it is just a mental problem. Which of course lots of folks that know me will agree with. But somehow it cured a lot of the low speed drive ability problems I had. 

I think it cleaned up the transition between no throttle and a some throttle and it smooth out that portion of the power band. 

But you may get the same results by pouring ethanol cleaner in the tank. :4317:

Ron I have offered you a test ride before, so when ever you want to give it a try, let me know.

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Ron-M

Thanks Bernie.  I am glad I found this thread.  Not only was I interested to see that others were having a problem with the clutch engagement, I was also interested to read that you (Bernie) were having a problem with a sloppy gear change.  I have a problem, at times, shifting from second to third.  About half the time, the gears seem to grind.  I don't believe I shift from second to third any differently than shifting into any other gear, but the second to third can be baffling at times.  

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Bernie

Try what I have been doing. Preload the shifter, then pull the clutch lever only 1/8-1/4”, while shifting from 2nd to 3. Gear. 
It requires very little clutch lever pull. Completely different than the HexHead you and are used to ride. 
Also try to shift above 4,000 rpms. 

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