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Someone is wrong on the internet


John Ranalletta

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Photoshop....

 

A studio where one can get pictures taken,developed, and purchased. Originally the enterprise was a stand alone kiosh or drive up shed in a shopping parking lot called Photo Hut. :)

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Guest Kakugo
I've never understood how one gets ON the internet.

 

Is there something like a bus stop?

 

 

No, you just sit on your keyboard or laptop and let it carry you around.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
Who here remembers typing into blank screens in the early days using phone modems?

 

 

...on a Commodore 64?

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Joe Frickin' Friday
logon:

 

No can't remember. What? I still have punch cards I use for notes!...and book markers.

 

My dad had (and probably still has) a giant box of those from a job in his distant past. I've only ever seen them used for note-taking and as shims in construction work.

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Who here remembers typing into blank screens in the early days using phone modems?

 

 

...on a Commodore 64?

 

My friend Tony had the cassette storage recorder to save our BASIC programs.

 

c64c.jpg

 

and then they ditched the whole thing and bought this bad boy, and life was good....

 

apple2-100009966-orig.jpg

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Who here remembers typing into blank screens in the early days using phone modems?

 

 

...on a Commodore 64?

 

My friend Tony had the cassette storage recorder to save our BASIC programs.

 

c64c.jpg

 

and then they ditched the whole thing and bought this bad boy, and life was good....

 

apple2-100009966-orig.jpg

 

Oh sure, show off the Apple when I was still using an Atari 16. :grin:

 

My friend had a TI 99, wow, what a machine. :rofl:

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My friend had a TI 99, wow, what a machine. :rofl:

Hah! He couldn't run programmable mag strips through his handheld to load programs like my 1979 HP-41C! :rofl:

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Guest Kakugo

 

and then they ditched the whole thing and bought this bad boy, and life was good....

 

apple2-100009966-orig.jpg

 

When my father's place got rid of their Apple II's around 1984, I got one for free. I was 7 or 8 at the time and learned the craft on it. My brother learned it much better than me, however... start them young!

When they got rid of their IIe's a few years later, I got another upgrade for free. ;)

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Oh sure, show off the Apple when I was still using an Atari 16. :grin:

 

Well that was my friend's as his dad was a techi for Honeywell. The Greiff's got one of these cheap, when the Apples picked up speed....

Commodore_Plus_4.jpg

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Who here remembers typing into blank screens in the early days using phone modems?

 

 

...on a Commodore 64?

 

Had one of those. Wrote a random math problem generator (in Basic) for my daughter. She'd select +-x or /, and it would generate a problem for her grade level (I could "adjust" the grade level by upping the problem from three-column numbers to four or five). A correct answer got a smilie face (created with asterisks and several lines of code) along with a beepbeepbeep happy noise. A wrong answer got her a frown face and a "sad" noise. After three attempts, it would offer to provide the correct answer. Wrote every line of code myself. First attempt at anything like that. Took three days to write and about a month to debug. I swore, never again, and as soon as they came out, I became an Apple guy. But I do have a PC laptop so I won't get nasty emails from Russell Bynum.

 

I might still have that program on a 5" floppy somewhere.

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russell_bynum
But I do have a PC laptop so I won't get nasty emails from Russell Bynum.

 

I don't care who you are...that's funny.

 

I was an Apple guy, too...back when Apple made the best stuff.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
My friend Tony had the cassette storage recorder to save our BASIC programs.

 

 

and then they ditched the whole thing and bought this bad boy, and life was good....

 

It ought to have been, since it was about three times the price of the C64. When I was 13, I managed to buy my own C64 with money I earned from mowing lawns at 8 bucks a pop.

 

Indeed, the Apple was nicer. I was exposed to it during a week-long summer camp that introduced kids to computers. Graphics were pretty easy to work with, and the disk drives were fast. But with the Commodore, I ended up learning more on my own about under-the-hood stuff. Peek and poke, machine language programming, "SYS 49152", and so on. Graphics and sound were decidedly NOT user-friendly, and it forced me to develop a gut-level understanding of bits and bytes, bit-wise logical operations, and that sort of thing.

 

It was horribly outdated by the time I tossed it in 1993 - but I still felt weird getting rid of it.

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But I do have a PC laptop so I won't get nasty emails from Russell Bynum.

 

I don't care who you are...that's funny.

 

I was an Apple guy, too...back when Apple made the best stuff.

 

They still make the best stuff. Haven't you been paying attention to the prices? :P

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It was horribly outdated by the time I tossed it in 1993 - but I still felt weird getting rid of it.

 

Horribly outdated? Yeah, a paperweight. :grin: The i486DXs were out by then.

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Remember when IBM came out with their first PC? Memory, we don't need no stinking memory but if you do each 256 K memory board, IIRC was around a grand. Just bought a 16 gig SD card on sale for $10.

 

What a tech revolution we have witnessed in the last 50 years.

 

I love it.

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Who remembers the commands Finger and Whois? Now those were the early days ...

 

OF course there were BB's used not blogs or wikis.

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Bill_Walker

Oh, you kids. I remember in college, punching up my FORTRAN code on the keypunch machines, submitting my card decks to the Holy Operators of the Burroughs B6700 mainframe computer, and then hours later getting a 14-page printout on 11x17 tractor feed paper that said "SYNTAX ERROR LINE 47". And then counting 47 cards into my deck to find the error, which could only be corrected, if I was lucky and didn't make any mistakes, by retyping the entire card. And then repeating the process, to get "SYNTAX ERROR LINE 49".

 

OK, that was freshman year, and there were already minicomputers with interactive editors by my senior year. At my first job, our minicomputer had removable disk packs that were maybe 20" in diameter and 10" tall, with 7 platters (just the packs, mind you. The drives were the size of washing machines). They held 20 megabytes. The computer, an early DEC VAX, had two of them, and there were probably 15 people using it. Life, or data storage, anyway, was much simpler Before Graphics.

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Oh, you kids. I remember in college, punching up my FORTRAN code on the keypunch machines, submitting my card decks to the Holy Operators of the Burroughs B6700 mainframe computer, and then hours later getting a 14-page printout on 11x17 tractor feed paper that said "SYNTAX ERROR LINE 47". And then counting 47 cards into my deck to find the error, which could only be corrected, if I was lucky and didn't make any mistakes, by retyping the entire card. And then repeating the process, to get "SYNTAX ERROR LINE 49".

 

OK, that was freshman year, and there were already minicomputers with interactive editors by my senior year.

You had mini computers?? Those of us programming in Basic, Fortran and early Cobol using compliers are the ones that *really* understand the significance of a hanging chad ...

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BTW, the next response should be something along the lines of "We had tablets back them -- you used a stick to write in the clay and ..." :D

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Oh lord, have I been that guy. For more than a decade, I ruined almost every Christmas with an annual database rebuild for Emory's library catalog. Reindexing 3 million records takes a lot of time, uses a lot of disk space, and if it fails, has to be started over again from the beginning.

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Bill_Walker
BTW, the next response should be something along the lines of "We had tablets back them -- you used a stick to write in the clay and ..." :D

 

Those were the fancy re-writable tablets that replaced the ones I started on that required a chisel and hammer. And they were small, too. As I recall, each tablet held only five lines of text.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
BTW, the next response should be something along the lines of "We had tablets back them -- you used a stick to write in the clay and ..." :D

 

Those were the fancy re-writable tablets that replaced the ones I started on that required a chisel and hammer. And they were small, too. As I recall, each tablet held only five lines of text.

 

Glad we finally got high-tech rewritable tablets when I was a kid:

 

wooly-willy-iron-filings-facial-hair-picture-maker-magnetic-personality-1314-p-M.jpg

 

 

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