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Nealey Tubeless Tire Repair Kit


eddd

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Over the years I've used several plug options. My favorite and the only one I now carry is the Nealey Tire Repair Kit.

 

Link

 

What makes the Nealey better than the rest is the size of the ropes which are much thinner than the generic type found at auto parts stores and places like Wal-Mart. The thinner ropes address the main problem associated with the generic type, difficulty inserting the rope into the hole.

 

Even though they are thinner, the technique used with Nealeys gives you four thicknesses of rope in the repair.

 

Here is a link to a post I made on tire repair. It show the Nealey kit in use and has a couple of tricks you might like to add to the way you repair flats.

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Great product, I always have the tube in my top case. I do also carry a T handled insertion tool which has made the repair strands easier to get into the tire than the one that comes with the kit.

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Dave_in_TX

I'm a fan of the Nealey kit also. It's a bit messier than the standard "stick strings" but goes in easy and makes a good patch Nealey claim their kit is a permanent patch. I picked up a nail in my rear tire and used the kit to patch it. I ran it for about another thousand miles until the tread was worn down to the replacement point. Nealey claim their kit is a permanent patch and the plug formed by the Nealey strings was till slightly sticky and no aire needed to be added during the thousand miles.

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MacGruber

I used a Neely plug when I found a screw in the back tire. After a while it developed a pinhole leak. I reamed it out with a drywall screw and re-plugged it. No problems so far. The drywall screw is now part of my repair kit.

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I found the Neely repair kit from a posting on THIS site. Never plugged a tire before but when I did the Neely kit worked like a charm.

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When I placed an order over the phone, the owner answered on his cell while driving, took my address, and said, send a ck. when I received the kit.

Great product.

 

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Dean Wirsing

I ordered a kit online yesterday. When I went to get my credit card out of my wallet to read the numbers to pay, the web page stated "Pay after you receive the kit." Don't see that every day!

 

Dean

 

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Same experience. Let me know if the below happens to you like it did to me when it arrives. They lost money on the shipping! So, I sent 'em a check with a tip on it to make it up to them.

 

2014-05-08%2021.34.55-M.jpg

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JerryMather

I just got mine in the mail today and sent out a money order to Matt ASAP.

 

But after doing some researching, I came across THIS while I was shopping for that inflator. Looks like we could have gotten a few of these for the price of one that we bought.

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I just got mine in the mail today and sent out a money order to Matt ASAP.

 

But after doing some researching, I came across THIS while I was shopping for that inflator. Looks like we could have gotten a few of these for the price of one that we bought.

 

Maybe...but until you have one of those in your hands there is no way of knowing the thickness, stickiness, and flexibility of the cords. Those three things, along with an easy to carry tube are what makes the Nealey an excellent tire repair kit.

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JerryMather

Eddd-

 

That's all true but he isn't making the strips but buying them and passing them along at a profit which is fine. The tube doesn't come with this other kit but because you question this, I'll buy the other and compare both because I just received the Nealey one & having two kits for multiple bikes doesn't sound unreasonable.

 

I'll get back to ya on this one, ordering now.

 

Done: $9.80 with shipping via credit card

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Interested in seeing the outcome, but that $7 shipping is, wait for it, a ream job. At least for my purchase I received a hand written note, a damn near impregnable tube, and a trip back to a simpler time when people did business on trust. Worth the markup!

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JerryMather

Hahaha, good to hear your pleased with your purchase Jake. So am I, but I did have to buy a money order and a stamp plus envelope to pay for the privilege of stepping back in time, making it a $15 plus order without the tip you gave them.

 

I'm just interested in seeing if there is a difference between the two. Worse case will be that I divide up the best strips and make up two kits tossing out the inferior ones IF they are different, we'll see. :lurk:

Finding a case for the new kit shouldn't be a problem.

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chrisolson

Hmmmm, don't know what all this money order and check business is all about ... paid for my Nealey kit via moderately modern PayPal ... no problem

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Interested in seeing the outcome, but that $7 shipping is, wait for it, a ream job. At least for my purchase I received a hand written note, a damn near impregnable tube, and a trip back to a simpler time when people did business on trust. Worth the markup!

 

+1 what he said!

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Dave_in_TX
I just got mine in the mail today and sent out a money order to Matt ASAP.

 

But after doing some researching, I came across THIS while I was shopping for that inflator. Looks like we could have gotten a few of these for the price of one that we bought.

 

Maybe...but until you have one of those in your hands there is no way of knowing the thickness, stickiness, and flexibility of the cords. Those three things, along with an easy to carry tube are what makes the Nealey an excellent tire repair kit.

 

Reading the fine print, indicates that the kit at the provided link is made by Camel. You can get the Camel kit at many auto parts stores. I have had the Camel kit. The cord material is significantly different than what is in the Nealey kit. The Nealey requires no glue but I wouldn't use the Camel cords without glue. I've also seen what the Nealey patch looks like from the inside of the tire. IMO, the Nealey kit is worth the extra cost.

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JerryMather

The cheaper kit is just that, a cheaper version of the Nealey kit with repair strips that do not have glue on them like the Nealey ones. So I'll divide up the good strips and use the tool that came in this other kit to make up two nice repair kits.

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JerryMather

Over the years I've used several plug options. My favorite and the only one I now carry is the Nealey Tire Repair Kit.

 

Link

 

What makes the Nealey better than the rest is the size of the ropes which are much thinner than the generic type found at auto parts stores and places like Wal-Mart. The thinner ropes address the main problem associated with the generic type, difficulty inserting the rope into the hole.

 

Even though they are thinner, the technique used with Nealeys gives you four thicknesses of rope in the repair.

 

Here is a link to a post I made on tire repair. It show the Nealey kit in use and has a couple of tricks you might like to add to the way you repair flats.

 

Can across this Review of a few 12V pumps that's worth reading too.

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Dave_in_TX
The cheaper kit is just that, a cheaper version of the Nealey kit with repair strips that do not have glue on them like the Nealey ones. So I'll divide up the good strips and use the tool that came in this other kit to make up two nice repair kits.

 

The Nealey strips do not have glue on them. They are a completely different material from the cheap strips. I'm surprised you own a BMW rather than a Ural since the Ural is just a cheaper version of a BMW.

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JerryMather
I'm surprised you own a BMW rather than a Ural since the Ural is just a cheaper version of a BMW.

 

That's not a very nice to say. All the Texans I've met around here are very nice folks what happened to you? Having a bad day?

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Dave_in_TX
I'm surprised you own a BMW rather than a Ural since the Ural is just a cheaper version of a BMW.

 

That's not a very nice to say. All the Texans I've met around here are very nice folks what happened to you? Having a bad day?

 

Nope, not having a bad day. Just don't understand your logic. It's apparent the only thing you know about the Nealey kit is from pictures. Seuously, calling the Camel tire strips a cheaper version of the Nealey is very much like calling a Ural a cheaper version of a BMW.

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All I know is I have used the Nealey product twice and it worked like a champ. So for ME if it ain't broke I am not trying to fix it!! It is Nealey for me!

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Hi, everyone. Based on the discussion here, I bit and bought a standard Nealey kit. Wow, I didn't realize that the tube was that long (14"). Anyway, I have a couple of dumb questions.

 

Dumb question #1: How do I get the red end caps off without breaking the tube? I tried twisting and pulling, but they would not budge. Am I being too timid? I'd really rather not break the tube.

 

Dumb question #2: The sticker on the tube says, For 2 & 4 ply tires, cut cord in half and insert tool halfway. I use Metzler Z8s. Would that be a 2- or 4-ply tire, or a 6- or greater?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

---John.

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You bought the long version. Most of us get the shorter ones. That tube is about 8" long. Yours is made to also handle repairs on big truck and equipment tires. In your case you might want to pre-cut some and maybe even cut the tube down. You most likely will want to change out the kit a few years down the road to ensure that yours are not drying out. Even at half size you still have plenty in the tube unless you are really unlucky or work in a nail manufacturing plant.

 

As for the tube, as you are pulling on one side you are creating a pretty strong vacuum. The caps are just slid over the tube, no threads. Work in small increments and try to get some air into the tube by working the cap so you create a little space for the air to get in.

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So I called. The order slipped thru the cracks. He is sending two units and apologized profusely.

 

Great customer service by taking care of the problem in such a straight up manner.

 

 

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You bought the long version. Most of us get the shorter ones. That tube is about 8" long. Yours is made to also handle repairs on big truck and equipment tires.

 

Thanks for your response.

 

Well, not surprisingly, that was stupid of me ... sigh .... After I read your response, I emailed Nealey about my mistake. I received a reply from Matt this morning telling me to return the 14" to exchange for the smaller kit. Hurray! :-)

 

---John.

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I've had a Nealey Kit tucked under the seat for several years (along with a Plug N Go, just in case). Since I'm going to the Un, I decided to "freshen up" my plug kit, so I ordered a new Nealey. It arrived in just a few days and is ready to go.

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I've had a Nealey Kit tucked under the seat for several years (along with a Plug N Go, just in case).

 

How many tire plug kits do y'all generally carry? Is more than one usual? Thanks.

 

---John.

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I've had a Nealey Kit tucked under the seat for several years (along with a Plug N Go, just in case).

 

How many tire plug kits do y'all generally carry? Is more than one usual? Thanks.

 

---John.

 

I used to carry none. Then, on the way to Eureka Springs, AR a few years ago, I got a drywall screw in the center of a brand new PR3. Went to Wally World and got a kit.

 

Carried the remainder of the kit forever. Checked it when this thread came up. Old, dry and no good. So I ordered one. Insurance so I won't have a flat. Kind of like rain gear. Bring it so it won't rain. :rofl:

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I've had a Nealey Kit tucked under the seat for several years (along with a Plug N Go, just in case).

 

How many tire plug kits do y'all generally carry? Is more than one usual? Thanks.

 

---John.

 

I used to carry a second type for real small diameter punctures, but once I developed this procedure I found that the Nealey was all I really needed.

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I've had a Nealey Kit tucked under the seat for several years (along with a Plug N Go, just in case).

 

How many tire plug kits do y'all generally carry? Is more than one usual? Thanks.

 

---John.

 

I used to carry a second type for real small diameter punctures, but once I developed this procedure I found that the Nealey was all I really needed.

 

And this post is an example of the nature of BMSWT. Riders sharing with other riders the good, bad and ugly.

 

You gatta love MRN! :clap:

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I've had a Nealey Kit tucked under the seat for several years (along with a Plug N Go, just in case).

How many tire plug kits do y'all generally carry? Is more than one usual? Thanks.

 

I used to carry a second type for real small diameter punctures, but once I developed this procedure I found that the Nealey was all I really needed.

 

Thanks, eddd. My mini Nealey arrived. Thanks for the link that describes your procedure for plugging a tire. Very helpful. With luck, now that I have a plug kit, I'll never need to use it. :-)

 

---John.

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  • 6 years later...
szurszewski

Resurrecting this thread while I’m here on the internet to order some more kits and a refill of strings. 
 

Monday morning, in the car on my way to work (about 90 miles in to a 120 mile “commute”), rolling along at 75mph, my TPMS light came on the dash. I pulled off the interstate and walking around the car the tires looked fine...but leaning down I could hear air coming out of one. My hybrid doesn’t have a spare, and no longer wears run-flats. Fortunately I carry a Nealey kit and a pump. 
 

Turned out I’d picked up a chip of rock - almost 3/4” wide - right in the middle of the tread face. Yikes. The hardest part was digging the rock out. I put in three ropes to fill the gash, and I was skeptical about it holding air - but it did, no problem! While I consider a single Nealey string a permanent repair, with these three I’ll be replacing the tire - though I am planning to drive back home (150ish miles) before doing that. 
 

anyway - all that just to say, a great product (and this particular kit is probably ten years old, but the strings still worked fine). 
 

278313C6-DD80-41D2-9BD1-CD979AD21A39.thumb.jpeg.1cc8c717ae23523001c8496b752fb9d8.jpeg018C4FE3-9EB6-42F4-AD1B-21D76A59A436.thumb.jpeg.b68e66db733709650af0fba5bd4fac7d.jpeg

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 4/29/2014 at 4:50 PM, eddd said:

 

Over the years I've used several plug options. My favorite and the only one I now carry is the Nealey Tire Repair Kit.

 

Link

 

What makes the Nealey better than the rest is the size of the ropes which are much thinner than the generic type found at auto parts stores and places like Wal-Mart. The thinner ropes address the main problem associated with the generic type, difficulty inserting the rope into the hole.

 

Even though they are thinner, the technique used with Nealeys gives you four thicknesses of rope in the repair.

 

Here is a link to a post I made on tire repair. It show the Nealey kit in use and has a couple of tricks you might like to add to the way you repair flats.

 

Eddd, this is an old post, and your link is dead.  But that said, thanks for the review.  I've purchased a kit for my motorcycle.

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2 minutes ago, Stir said:

 

Eddd, this is an old post, and your link is dead.  But that said, thanks for the review.  I've purchased a kit for my motorcycle.

 

Fototime, where all my photos were stored had a "catastrophic" failure due to a fire in France, and everyone who had photos on that site are left with nothing.  How a company could fail to have multiple backups is beyond me, but they are gone forever. 

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