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replace rear brake pads


RAMBLIN RED

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Just received new pads from boneyard (Carbon-Lorraine A3 front and X3 rear) I followed the instructions carefully, just the rear, so far, but something is not right. The pads look the same as the old ones just new and thick. The two pistons are pushed in flat but when the pads are installed there is no room for the rotor and the outside pad has no room to fit on the shelf opposite the retainer pin. The thing dangles out of the caliper!! I read somewhere that these pads fit the Brembo caliper with the two large circles printed on them, my front brakes are so marked, the rear have a different mark. Has my rear caliper been changed? Am I missing something? I am red headed and left handed ya know...

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I recently put the X3 on the rear of my 03 RT. The only problem I had was with the clip that fell out of the top of the caliper. I broke it trying to install it incorrectly.

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Just received new pads from boneyard (Carbon-Lorraine A3 front and X3 rear) I followed the instructions carefully, just the rear, so far, but something is not right. The pads look the same as the old ones just new and thick. The two pistons are pushed in flat but when the pads are installed there is no room for the rotor and the outside pad has no room to fit on the shelf opposite the retainer pin. The thing dangles out of the caliper!! I read somewhere that these pads fit the Brembo caliper with the two large circles printed on them, my front brakes are so marked, the rear have a different mark. Has my rear caliper been changed? Am I missing something? I am red headed and left handed ya know...

I have determined that my rear caliper is the original. I there more to do than just pushing in the pistons? I can't seemto get enough clearance to allow the rotor to seat.

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The calliper slides on pins between it and the bracket that bolts to the FD. The grease on these pins tends to turn thick and gummy, preventing the sliding motion. Pull the two pieces apart, clean off the old grease, re-grease with a high-melting point grease (I use castrol moly grease) and reassemble. This should allow the calliper to slide on the pins and allow clearance. I do this every pad change and service to keep the rear brake in good order - it suffers from being at the back of the bike and the road crud/spray that comes from both wheels.

 

Andy

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The calliper slides on pins between it and the bracket that bolts to the FD. The grease on these pins tends to turn thick and gummy, preventing the sliding motion. Pull the two pieces apart, clean off the old grease, re-grease with a high-melting point grease (I use castrol moly grease) and reassemble. This should allow the calliper to slide on the pins and allow clearance. I do this every pad change and service to keep the rear brake in good order - it suffers from being at the back of the bike and the road crud/spray that comes from both wheels.

 

Andy

Thanks for the explanation Andy, I can now see what you mean. My slide is so frozen I thought it was one piece.

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The calliper slides on pins between it and the bracket that bolts to the FD. The grease on these pins tends to turn thick and gummy, preventing the sliding motion. Pull the two pieces apart, clean off the old grease, re-grease with a high-melting point grease (I use castrol moly grease) and reassemble. This should allow the calliper to slide on the pins and allow clearance. I do this every pad change and service to keep the rear brake in good order - it suffers from being at the back of the bike and the road crud/spray that comes from both wheels.

 

Andy

Thanks for the explanation Andy, I can now see what you mean. My slide is so frozen I thought it was one piece.

 

Some Dude at ADV Rider did a nice writeup w/photos about this exact problem.

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This is a good demonstration re why one should always ask for help if not fully knowledgeable about the intended service work. Keeping that rear caliper sliding is essential to preventing potentially expensive damage caused by dragging pads leading to brake overheating. Simply replacing worn pads in a stuck caliper will at best lead to rapid pad wear but perhaps to rotor damage and worse.

 

All sliding caliper designs should always be checked for full and free movement of the caliper parts at every service. Many modern cage calipers and a lot of bike calipers are of this type, both front and rear, because they are cheaper to make. Most stuff does not have the 4 piston type that is on the front of most BMW models and other brands of modern sportbikes, etc..

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Their is also a special "caliper grease". Same type used on cars.

It doesn't take much and it is *cheap*...!

You can purchase little packs of this grease at any of the local auto chain stores,usually on a small rack by the checkout register.

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This is a good demonstration re why one should always ask for help if not fully knowledgeable about the intended service work. Keeping that rear caliper sliding is essential to preventing potentially expensive damage caused by dragging pads leading to brake overheating. Simply replacing worn pads in a stuck caliper will at best lead to rapid pad wear but perhaps to rotor damage and worse.

 

All sliding caliper designs should always be checked for full and free movement of the caliper parts at every service. Many modern cage calipers and a lot of bike calipers are of this type, both front and rear, because they are cheaper to make. Most stuff does not have the 4 piston type that is on the front of most BMW models and other brands of modern sportbikes, etc..

 

My closest dealer is 160 miles in Va, nearest in Nc is 230 miles. If my bike is to be serviced it will happen in my shop, and I learn as I go. I have a lot more to learn and as these things come up I will continue to ask. I could not know about the caliper design until I was immersed in the work. Perhaps you were born with full knowledge, but I have to work at it

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I recently greased the slide pins. If you want to do this right, take the rear pin of the caliper, so you can clean up both pins. Use an 11mm wrench on the rear pin. Loosen it before removing the caliper, then when you remove the caliper you will be able to finish working the pin out. The back part of the slide will then rotate around and off.

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I recently greased the slide pins. If you want to do this right, take the rear pin of the caliper, so you can clean up both pins. Use an 11mm wrench on the rear pin. Loosen it before removing the caliper, then when you remove the caliper you will be able to finish working the pin out. The back part of the slide will then rotate around and off.

 

Thanks, I cleaned some goo off the slide then a little wd40 loosened it up. All nice and clean now and properly lubed. I'll make a point of lubing it every few months to avoid future problems. Thanks for the tip.

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