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r60/2


Codeman

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I met a guy today that found out I like BMWs so took me to his garden shed. Inside was a 1965 R60/2 in original, good to nice condition. I wish I had photos but do not. It had 20k miles. I turned it over for him, had great compression. It has the original exhaust on it that is more shiny than my current ride. He is a retired aerospace engineer and has restored bikes, cars and planes in the past and used to race when younger ( he seemed to be about 80). He said he had done very little to the bike which he rescued from being stored for a long time. It had no gas in it as he is storing it so I didn't start it.

 

In any case it was a nice looking bike. Now I have bike lust. Does anyone on here have any idea what this bike is worth? NADA has a price, but I don't know how accurate it is. I know I'm not giving you much to go on, ball park is ok.

 

The other question is anyone have any experience with a vintage R60? I'll be doing some more research but I've always been amazed at the collective knowledge of this forum. Thanks in advance!

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One thing you need to consider is the condition the engine is in.

I've heard and read all sorts of stories about those old boxers. One thing is for certain: if the bike hasn't been run for quite a while it will need a full engine/gearbox inspection and most if not all bearings will probably need to be replaced. This is of course assuming there isn't anything else wrong with the engine. Oh, and let's not forget it will need new wheel bearings, quite a few rubber parts, having the brake drums adjusted etc. If the bike has been stored for many years it may look fine but there are so many things that can wrong and let's not forget it's '60s technology we are talking about. Also if I remember correctly the slingers in the /2 engine act as oil filters and should cleaned every 20000 miles or so to avoid damage to big end bearings. Sadly to do this the crankshaft needs to be removed.

 

Based on similar experiences I'd say the bike is worth anything between $2500 and $3500, depending on your haggling skills and how the seller feels about the bike. The bike is not exactly rare and though it's in good overall conditions, the engine is a bit of a mystery.

 

If you bag the deal consider the costs of an engine overhaul may go from about $500 in parts if you do the job yourself and don't find any surprises to a few grands if you have a competent mechanic do the job for you and he finds the engine needs more than a few bearings. The Many-in-One Tool from Cycle Works could be your best friend here. This is, of course, on top of all other things you'll need to fix/replace while fixing the bike.

Could be an interesting project: I really wish my old lady would allow me to do so. :)

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Vintage R 60?

500+000+and+600+000+mile+badges1153063520.jpg

 

600,000 miles qualify?

 

Bike is the late Fred Tausch's.

 

Slow and steady wins the race on one of these, IMO.

Had an R 50,loved it until a truck ran over me on it.

Bike came through better than I did.

:rofl:

 

These bikes are worth 5 figures restored and with low mileage.

Three figures if ratted with high mileage.

 

Put some gas in and check the fluids.

Bet it cranks second kick (tickle it).

A pure joy to ride around BMW afficianados.

Other riders will ooh and ahh when it is on the road.

Seems the guy would like it to be running?

Promise him to treat it right, start at $1500 w/everything there and matching numbers.

If it cranks and runs, bump it up $500-1000 with the realization

that even doing the work yourself $500-$1500 output likely.

I'd contact Sharon, Bullit on here, as she has done a full on resto, wrt cost.

Pretty safe bet if you're lucky under $4500 if it all there and nothing was wrong when parked.

 

Worth?

Depends on how much fun you have.

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I have a 1969 R60/2 and a 1965 R50/2 and have been into vintage BMWs for many years. Prices of these bikes were somewhat depressed for awhile but seem to have recently resumed their upward climb. Not surprisingly, prices are dependent on many factors including the model. R69's and R69S's seem to bring the highest numbers and there is renewed interest in the singles. Prices from NADA, etc. don't mean much. Originality counts, most particularly the paint and pinstripes. Maintenance, options, degree of rust and deterioration are also important. These bikes have no oil filters and the condition of the oil slingers is paramount. The factory recommended slinger reconditioning at 40K miles. However, unless there is documentation that the slingers have already been cleaned or replaced, you must assume that they need attending to even at that low mileage. My R60 had a documented 11.5K miles when I acquired it and when I broke it down at 13.5K to inspect the slingers, they were nearly full of something resembling asphalt. I believe that years-long periods of inactivity combined with improper engine oils had something to do with this. While the engine was apart, I replaced bearings, seals, etc., which I believe most people would do. As for value, I would be surprised to see it sell for anything less than about $6K - $7K. If he's around that price or lower, please let me know because I know a bunch of people who will line up. There is a sort of 5-5-5 "rule" in the vintage BMW community that says $5K for the initial purchase, $5K for the mechanicals, and $5K for the cosmetics. I don't know if that's entirely accurate but probably a pretty good rule of thumb. An added consideration is that bikes from the mid-sixties are prone to cylinder head issues (do a search for "butterheads). Not necessarily a deal-breaker but something to be aware of going in. Most everything that you do to these bikes in the way of restoration has become uber-expensive. For more info, take a look at the VBMWMO website and consult the /2 Yahoo group.

 

Richard

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Thanks all. I appreciate the info. I will continue to do some more research, and when this storm blows over I'll go back out and take a closer look with a camera.

Course the secondary issue as Kakugo mentioned is getting the requisite go ahead from my lovely wife.

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Had my /2 (1961 R69s, seriously modified) for 34 seasons until 1999. Great bikes. Not much inside the engine or out to deteriorate (except obvious stuff).

 

But working on a /2 far more challenging than the bolt-together poor-tolerance bikes BMW has made since. More precision, more tapers and keys, more shrink-on parts. Special pullers needed (most of which you can make yourself). MUCH more satisfying engineering to work with than stuff today (which is far more advanced in other respects, of course). More to learn.

 

Carbs "rust" out but epoxy can help.

 

Ben

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About 15 years ago as I was riding my R60/2 in rush-hour traffic, the driver ahead of me got on his brakes with some seriousness. So, I grabbed a handful of ... almost nothing. Fortunately, I was able to take the gap between lanes of stopped cars.

 

At the time, I also owned an RD400 which I rode more frequently. I had not mentally shifted to an entirely different interpretation of the term "brake."

 

Bob

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Braking is different, that's for sure. I haven't had any close calls with the old brakes (touch wood) but switching off from a contemporary ABS bike to a /2 requires a different mindset. Not to mention the Earles front end and, oh yes, the gearbox. Smooth shifting up and down on one of these bikes is a technique that, once mastered, makes you smile inside your helmet. All that said, cruising down a winding country two-lane on a spring morning on a well sorted out /2 is an experience to be savored.

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Brakes on a /2 can be first class... if you are expert at lubing and adjusting that kind of dual leading-shoe brake on the front wheel.

 

Hint: take whole wheel all laced up to a truck machine shop and ask them to turn the drum AFTER they are laced up and then to fit the shoes.

 

.... and then there was the time I was coming down from Mount Washington after sunset (before road got leveled a lot) in 1968.

 

Ben

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Vintage R 60?

500+000+and+600+000+mile+badges1153063520.jpg

 

600,000 miles qualify?

 

Bike is the late Fred Tausch's.

 

Slow and steady wins the race on one of these, IMO.

Had an R 50,loved it until a truck ran over me on it.

Bike came through better than I did.

:rofl:

 

These bikes are worth 5 figures restored and with low mileage.

Three figures if ratted with high mileage.

 

Put some gas in and check the fluids.

Bet it cranks second kick (tickle it).

A pure joy to ride around BMW afficianados.

Other riders will ooh and ahh when it is on the road.

Seems the guy would like it to be running?

Promise him to treat it right, start at $1500 w/everything there and matching numbers.

If it cranks and runs, bump it up $500-1000 with the realization

that even doing the work yourself $500-$1500 output likely.

I'd contact Sharon, Bullit on here, as she has done a full on resto, wrt cost.

Pretty safe bet if you're lucky under $4500 if it all there and nothing was wrong when parked.

 

Worth?

Depends on how much fun you have.

 

Slight correction - when I saw Tausch's bike in 2004 at Lime Rock, it was an R60/5. OP's talking R60/2.

 

Here's a pic I took of Tausch's bike

 

04lr9.jpg

 

-MKL

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