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Coil puller


Swag

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Sometimes coils are on so tight they don't come off with a direct pull, even with a puller.

In that case, a lever under the edge of the puller can be used (even as simple as a screwdriver) but be sure to pad it so you don't mar the bike.

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  • 3 months later...
Jim VonBaden
Sometimes coils are on so tight they don't come off with a direct pull, even with a puller.

In that case, a lever under the edge of the puller can be used (even as simple as a screwdriver) but be sure to pad it so you don't mar the bike.

 

True, I sometimes do it like this:

 

Spark-plug-removal-2spk-2.jpg

 

Shown on an 1150, but the same on the R1200.

 

Jim :Cool:

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Morning Bswag

 

If you use a coil puller you really should disconnect the wire harness going to the coil first.

 

Using most coil pullers on a coil that has been on the plug for a while almost guarantees that the coil will snap off with force & a large jump. Very easy to damage or ruin that coil harness plug or the coil itself if the wire harness is still connected to the coil when it jumps free.

 

Using 2 screw drivers in the coil slot similar to what Jim shows only one on top & one from the bottom allows the coil to slide off the plug in a very smooth & controlled manner with no harness or coil plug damage. (the only way I personally remove a 1200 hexhead or camhead upper coil.

 

Then, when re-installing use a just a dab of spark plug dielectric grease in the coil boot as that seals the moisture out really makes next coil removal a non-issue.

 

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