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Gear Report - 65mph to 0


Kathy R

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Just got my helmet and jacket back :clap:

It is like seeing a dear old friend from the fox hole.

Thank you to Dennis Murphy, David E.B. Smith and Steve Knapp for taking care of my affairs in Illinois. :)

 

Jacket: OLYMPIA AST - sliced toast

Gloves: HELD - STEVES - burnt toast

Helmet: Nolan n102 (exterior shade visor) (modular - flip face) - toasted toast

Boots - SIDI - VERTIGO - no damage - ready to ride

 

I cannot say enough good about the above gear. I don't have any memory of what happened after the initial impact, but it's quite evident to me that the hit to the top of the helmet was a killer.

 

Gear Photos

 

When I ride again don't be surprised if I'm wearing a Roman Soldier chest plate under my jacket :grin:

 

 

 

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Mrs. Caddis

Thanks for posting those pictures. A reminder of how good gear can make such a difference in the outcome of an accident.

 

The Steve II gloves are on my list!

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Makes my bones ache just looking at the gear! :eek:

 

"when I ride again"

 

Curious as to how you feel about getting back out there. I've been lucky and that's all I'm gonna say about that but, something as traumatic as that would no doubt make anyone think. Ok, maybe not Ray! :grin:

 

Pat

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That's one tough license plate belonging to one tough owner! Can't wait until this is all resolved for you - what an ordeal.

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Thanks Eileen. I was always fascinated to see the after photos, showing how the gear did or didn't hold up. It definitely reinforces why it's better to just wear it. The medical people came to view me, like a monkey in a cage, each day; "Normally folks like you are DOA".

 

Makes my bones ache just looking at the gear! :eek:

 

"when I ride again"

 

Curious as to how you feel about getting back out there. I've been lucky and that's all I'm gonna say about that but, something as traumatic as that would no doubt make anyone think. Ok, maybe not Ray! :grin:

 

Pat

 

Bottom line is, Pat, I miss leaning into corners. I really miss that feeling. Driving doesn't compare to riding, at least not since I went from a sports car to a sedan.

 

My fears? I'm very afraid of horrible pain. That is what scares me, a lot.

Time has helped to make that fade and so I expect that fear to ease even more. I also now understand what I didn't understand about how to take pain medication properly. I didn't take enough and I didn't take it often enough. I'm starting to recognize that if something happened again, and I was lucky again, I'd know how to physically manage it better.

 

Since it happened on an interstate, the place you least expect a crash, I'm emotionally shy about that kind of route now. I'm sensitive to folks cutting in front of me, without leaving much space. I don't freak out, but it is uncomfortable.

 

The fact that this event was an unforeseen attack makes it hard to treat it as reality and as such I don't expect it to ever happen again. My logical mind had a difficult time accepting the irrational nature of the crash, but that same mind is helping me treat this event clinically. As the body mends, so does the mind.

 

I don't yet want to buy a bike.

I can't imagine not owning a bike again. :)

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That's one tough license plate belonging to one tough owner! Can't wait until this is all resolved for you - what an ordeal.

 

I don't feel tough at all, but thank you for saying that I am, dear Jake :wave:

I think I have really good bounce though :grin:

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I don't yet want to buy a bike.

I can't imagine not owning a bike again. :)

That pretty much sums up everything. I got hit by a deer in November 2007. All my gear held up, and I ended up with a few bruises and a cracked little finger. By February I was looking, and (to my great surprise) joined the boxer owners club. You'll know when you are ready.

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Thanks for those words Selden. I'm glad you mended. Nasty business.

 

I still wince inside every time I walk into the garage and don't see a motorcycle.

I'm going to hang my jacket and gloves and pants on the wall. I'm fond of looking at them and feel a sense of gratitude to these inanimate objects. Funny huh.

 

I just hope folks opt to wear the gear. Mending is hard enough without facial reconstruction, skin grafts and the like.

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Paul Mihalka

"I can't imagine not owning a bike again :) " :thumbsup::wave:

That is wonderful! I know the feeling. After I crashed into a deer on my way to work at Bob's BMW, I was in emergency with a broken arm, separated shoulder and cracked sternum. Bob's people already picked up the bike. Call from Bob. After making sure I'll live, tells me that my bike is definitely totaled - I guess I knew that and knew what to do. Right away I told him which of the used bikes we have in stock I'm going to buy and don't sell it. :grin:

 

 

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Wow! 'Looks like I missed something! Glad you're mostly OK, Kathy.

 

I'm confused. :S The date on the pictures says 2011, yet the date on the post is today?!! Are there more details posted somewhere?

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Wow! 'Looks like I missed something! Glad you're mostly OK, Kathy.

 

I'm confused. :S The date on the pictures says 2011, yet the date on the post is today?!! Are there more details posted somewhere?

 

:wave: It happened near Joliet, IL on 5/25/2011, on the ride back to NY from Torrey, UT. Long story, of course, but it's all better now. The DL650 is toast. More details after the Trial, sometime later this year. I am just one of the witnesses for the State now. I can now ride a bicycle and I know I'll handle a clutch again.

 

My bike and gear have been in EB's garage, in Chicago, until I got my head together to get the bike issue resolved and get the remains of the gear home. Nigel was very interested in this gear as I unpacked it. I'm not sure if it was because it smelled like me or EB's dogs :grin:

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Bill_Walker

I'm sure glad that your gear did its job and you're still with us. I hope the law punishes the idiot who took you out. And I really hope to see you riding again, and to ride with you again!

 

Thanks to my wife's surgeries, last month's Torrey was my first significant riding since I broke my collarbone in NC. To my surprise, I found that my riding was way off, at least at speed. I did pretty well until I hit tar snakes on 12, and then I was completely paranoid and tense, and looking at the snakes instead of at my line through the corner. It got much better as the week went on.

 

I'm telling you this to point out that this will probably happen to you when you get back on a bike. Basic local riding may be fine, but when you find yourself in an unusual situation, your fear of pain may kick in and keep you from riding well. Be ready for it, expect it, and know that you'll get through it.

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Kathy,

Glad things are moving forward.

You will know when to get the new ride, looking forward to that.

 

You know I've survived hit and runs on a boxer, a bicycle, a red light runner who broadsided me thru a windshield, and more.

 

After each incident time passed and two wheels became part of my life again, as it will with you.

 

I'm 11 months with just 2 little rides while going thru chemotherapy.

I'm weak and worry my good looks are going.

 

Plans are to crank the GT soon.

Not sure what soon means as I'm too weak right now, but soon.

Maybe I'll get the chance sooner than later, who knows, but I will be riding, soon.

I know you will be too.

 

Looking forward to seeing you on your new bike, soon.

Good luck.

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Hey Bill, that is great advice and I will take it. Thank you. It's wonderful to know you were at Torrey again. Every once in a while my screen saver pops up with a photo of you in a blue wig :grin: and I smile.

 

Thanks folks for the good thoughts. I'm really good now.

 

My main point here is to encourage the use of good gear. I hear folks talk about getting the most comfortable or the least expensive gear and while those considerations matter, they are down the list behind what is the denier of the fabric, is it foam or CEArmor, how well will this gear stay on me in a fast get off....

I'm preaching to the choir. I learned everything I know about good gear on this site. Cripes, before I started riding the RT I was on a HD with a bandana :dopeslap:

 

Tim, you inspire me. Nothing would make me happier than for us to take a ride, with Beth on your pillion seat, at a future HeleNbak or any gathering down the road. See you there! :)

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Firenailer

I'm glad to hear that you're on the mend and planning to ride again!

 

And thanks for the ATGATT reminder, I saw plenty of accidents over my 25 year career, and I just can't believe you came out of that kind of accident without much more serious damage than a broken wrist!

 

You must have truly had an angel on your shoulder that day, glad that you're going to be OK.

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AdventurePoser

Wow, so glad you are ok! Thanks for the photos...I have ridden thousands of miles in both the AST and AST2 jackets...Worthy!

 

Hope to see you on the road sooner rather than later!

 

Steve in So Cal

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My main point here is to encourage the use of good gear. I hear folks talk about getting the most comfortable or the least expensive gear and while those considerations matter, they are down the list behind what is the denier of the fabric, is it foam or CEArmor, how well will this gear stay on me in a fast get off....

 

I'm preaching to the choir. I learned everything I know about good gear on this site. Cripes, before I started riding the RT I was on a HD with a bandana :dopeslap:

 

No, you are not preaching to the choir. There is someone reading this, very similarly to what I did back in '07, who will then go and ditch the lousy gear and get something that will better protect. I did. And I thank those like you who shared, with pics as evidence, what happens. And if I have a get off and survive with a tale like this one, I will surely share with all. As you read future posts with this sort of story, I hope you reallize you likely significantly contributed to saving a life or at least saved a sole from a lot of suffering.

 

Thank you Kathy!

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Thank you Bob. I am sincerely curious about what I hit and how I "bounced down the roadway". It seems I'm in the minority (most of my family and friends cringe) but I am fascinated by the mechanics of what happened to me. I will never forget coming to the realization that I was laying on my back, rather than tooling down I 80, trying to move eastward between tornado warnings.

 

Thanks Steve. I am pretty sure I saw photos of you in the AST. I thought, OK, if he's wearing that, it must be a good jacket. I've got an old First Gear Kilimanjaro jacket in the closet, but it's not the Olympia AST. I knew the AST was a little stiff by comparison, but that was an indication of it's ultimate purpose.

 

And ladies need to wear the hip armor. SO WHAT if it makes you wider! I was told I would surely have had a broken right hip without it. My right hip took months to heal, but it was real sore rather than broken.

 

Man, thank you EddyQ. That's what it's all about here. Pay it forward.

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Kathy,

Glad to hear you are on the mend. I did hear about your tale after it happened but had not heard much since likely due to the impending legal action. I've posted trip pictures on Facebook and had cruiser buddy's reply that I should ditch all of that gear......never! I've been down twice in my life, the second time wearing full gear.....bruises only that time. Not so lucky when I was 17! Hope you get the urge to ride back.

 

Russ

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Shiny Side Up

Kathy - All I can say is there was a Hand on you that day.

How blessed you are.

I hit a Cadillac head-on in 1967. The driver was confused, pulled out and was headed the wrong way on a one way street. Speed limit was 50mph and I was doing every bit of that. I was only 17 but my dad had one stipulation about letting me buy a motorcycle. That I also buy a helmet and jacket and wear them all the time. That helmet took a beating and is probably the only reason I'm still around to write this.

I never forgot that day and I still feel the same way about about protective gear. I won't ride across a parking lot without a helmet.

 

65 to 0 is no joke - I'm so glad you're ok - I also hope that justice is served.

 

God Bless you dear.

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Russ and SSU - Thank you gentlemen, and everyone, for your kind words. It's very helpful for folks to know that the gear can really matter. We don't get to choose when the get off will occur. I hear you both. :wave:

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Kathy,

Very glad that you are still with us after that. Pretty scary stuff!

 

And, thanks for the report on how the gear helped.

 

I have a gear question if it's ok, did the pants have CE armor at the hips or just foam? My current pair has CE armor for the knees but only soft foam at the hips, and I'm looking to figure out whether I should upgrade.

TIA

 

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TN_R11_Girl
Tim, you inspire me. Nothing would make me happier than for us to take a ride, with Beth on your pillion seat, at a future HeleNbak or any gathering down the road. See you there! :)

 

Hey!! I want IN on this!!!! Tim I have been on/off the board sporadically and didn't know you were having chemo... Sorry you're having to deal with it, but will look forward to riding with you, Beth & Kathy again. Heal quickly!!

 

Kathy... you'll heal as well. Just takes time, and Bill is right, you'll be surprised at how "off" you feel even when there's noplace you'd rather be.

 

xoxo

Shannon

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Thanks again barryd and Shannon :wave:

 

 

I have a gear question if it's ok, did the pants have CE armor at the hips or just foam? My current pair has CE armor for the knees but only soft foam at the hips, and I'm looking to figure out whether I should upgrade.

TIA

 

Yes, I'm happy to answer questions about the gear :Cool:

 

The over pants I was wearing have CE approved armor at the hips. They are Firstgear TPG Escape.

 

The Current TPG armor that they are using.

 

The armor that is in my version of this pant looks slightly different than the armor in this latest version of their TPG over pant. I will hope it's as good or better. It is KNOX CE H Type A en1621-1. This is the armor from my right hip area. Not a mark on it.

 

i-vSwDhzN-L.jpg

 

 

Here is the right hip/rear pocket of the TPG over pant. The hip armor is to the right of that pocket with the flap, running vertically. Gosh, there is abrasion to right of the hip armor too. That is the front pocket to the right.

Let's just say that parts of me were the color of pomegranate juice. :grin:

 

i-rkMPhLn-L.jpg

 

Under the pocket flap is a zipper and that zipper head caused failure in the fabric. As a rule I do not ride with hard objects in my pockets. I'd always thought such an item might cause me problems on impact. No doubt!

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Kathy,

When I worked at a dealership we saw numerous examples of items like cell phones in a jacket that caused broken ribs on impact.

Keys are another no-no, IMO.

 

Great post.

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Glenn Reed
Kathy,

Very glad that you are still with us after that. Pretty scary stuff!

 

And, thanks for the report on how the gear helped.

 

I have a gear question if it's ok, did the pants have CE armor at the hips or just foam? My current pair has CE armor for the knees but only soft foam at the hips, and I'm looking to figure out whether I should upgrade.

TIA

 

Agreed as to Kathy and her rehab, I still look forward to meeting up sometime.

 

As to the gear question, I am in the same boat, with a pair of Olympia Airglide pants. CE at the knees but only foam in the hips. I looked and Held make and sell CE armor that looks like a direct replacement, so I am planning on ordering a pair from them.

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Thanks Tim.

 

Thanks Glenn. Gosh, I'm very glad to read that. May you never need it. :)

 

The AST is in 500 and 1000 denier fabric. I suspect the 1000 is the black fabric on my jacket shoulders and arms. You can see the difference in the wear. The tears are in the 500 denier.

 

Don't we wish we had a choice and could be in 1000 denier and sliding to a stop. I know folks who have slid to a stop after a triple digit get off and thanks to the quality of the gear and a leather wallet they still have butt cheeks. :grin:

 

 

 

 

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Paul Mihalka

Mention of butt cheeks reminds me me of all the bikers who ride with chaps for "protection". And at the Harley/BMW dealership where I work they ask me why I wear leather pants and not chaps.

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I still have my chaps. :dopeslap:

 

I won't sell them or give them away. I don't want the guilt when a butt is ripped off.

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I still have my chaps. :dopeslap:

 

I won't sell them or give them away. I don't want the guilt when a butt is ripped off.

 

Why are they called assless chaps? Because after you slide down the road, you'll be assless.

 

Sorry, maybe that belongs in the pun thread. :P

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Paul Mihalka
I still have my chaps. :dopeslap:

 

I won't sell them or give them away. I don't want the guilt when a butt is ripped off.

But I'm sure they look good on you! :wave:

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RichEdwards

Glad you're well-healed after a year, Kathy. Good gear is priceless and we should all wear it every time we get on a bike.

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Good gear discussion by experienced riders who know the difference between reality and fantasy. Glad you were having a lucky bounce day- that type of speed is way into the danger zone and every bit of luck helps..

 

You're reminding me to re-verify the armor on all my gear and upgrade or ditch older stuff that lacks current practice materials. For example, I use a couple RevIt jackets but have fitted them with optional backpads because stock they only have foam. My Roadcrafter has the good stuff..Need to look at my summer pants...

 

I suspect many of us have a "what convinced me to wear gear" story. Mine was at a TT race at a track north of Baltimore in the early 60s (pre helmet laws and special licenses era). Watched a racer hit a tree with his head with one of those sickening thuds that telegraphs bad news.

To my complete astonishment, after a few seconds he stood up and removed a cracked helmet that I learnd was an early Bell. I thought his survival intact was so cool I imediately got my first helmet and have not ridden without one since- have owned many, still own about 6 for various purposes and regularly upgrade. Took me a while longer to get sold on all the rest- that was way before good textile riding gear or affordables leathers suitable for hot weather were available but I got lucky while learning and have never had to seriously test mine.

 

BTW, as a track instructor in cars I've seen folks walk away from wrecks with a cracked chin bar on their full face helmet but with teeth and jaw still intact. That's enough proof for me that anything less is just dumb. I also do classroom stuff at the track and one of my early sessions for beginners is devoted to proper safety gear selection and use.

Sounds like you could teach a good class with your own personal examples on hand. That kind of reality makes more of a lasting impression on students. I still remember a class I took from a racer at Watkins Glen years ago that was spent in the pits examining his wrecked vehicle and safety gear. After a 120 mph impact with the armco that totaled the car, he and his crew had already spent almost a day on critical examination of the wreck so they could locate and change whatever had caused his minor hand injury when they built the replacment- he was otherwise unscratched and uninjured. Today we almost take for granted that racers step out of wrecks unhurt but it was only 40 yrs ago that 1 of 7 high level pros were killed every year and racing was a blood sport. A lot of good engineering has changed all of that..

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Bill_Walker
Sounds like you could teach a good class with your own personal examples on hand.

 

That kind of thing is very effective, or at least it was for me. When I took the MSF basic class back in the 80s, the instructor had two samples he passed around. One was a post-crash full-face helmet, and we were asked to examine the gouges and imagine the effects on a bare head. The other was a chunk of asphalt that came up from a road, and we were to rub our hands briskly across it, noting how rough and comfortable it was, and then imagine it at 65 mph. I've never forgotten them.

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You are sweet, Paul, but chaps are for cowboys.

 

 

 

I find it fascinating that a number of non riding neighbors have come over to see the toasted gear. I've added my helmet to a prominent location in my living room.

 

"Here's a rare red Waterford bowl and here is my N102."

 

:grin:

 

They have all encouraged me to write to the gear manufacturers, which I plan to do.

 

 

Yeah, you folks are right. This gear is powerful stuff. Eventually, I will reach out to the local MSF and offer them my story and props. Perhaps the fact that I'm old enough to be many of their riders Mom will create a buzz :grin:

 

I know 1000 denier is pretty stiff and that's why I can't find an entire jacket made of that stuff, but I am looking into a CE chest/torso plate. I'm going to look like the bomb squad going down the road :D

 

i-3DmqsHp-M.jpg

 

 

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Hi Kathy,

 

Thankfully you were wearing top quality gear and it did its job.

 

Where did you get the sticker on your helmet about not removing it till examined by a doctor or EMT?

 

Francis

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Where did you get the sticker on your helmet about not removing it till examined by a doctor or EMT?

 

Hi Francis :wave:

 

I just looked for them on-line, with no luck. I did read that many people came across them at bike shows.

 

When I lived in Chicago I used to ride up to Beaver Damn Wisconsin to get tires and sometimes to have service done to the RT. It was a nice little ride for great service with great people at Mischler's BMW. They had a little container of these stickers on the front counter. It seemed like a good idea to have one on the helmet, front and back.

 

Once, while riding to Torrey, RonB was slowly catching up to me somewhere in southern Utah. He said he knew it was me because he could see the stickers on my black helmet from afar. :grin:

 

In my case, one of my witnesses is an off duty paramedic and he was pivotal in my care at the scene. I will never forget hearing his words "I'm a rider". That brought me comfort. I knew a brother had ahold of me.

 

 

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Nice n Easy Rider

Where did you get the sticker on your helmet about not removing it till examined by a doctor or EMT?

 

Hi Francis :wave:

 

I just looked for them on-line, with no luck. I did read that many people came across them at bike shows.

 

When I lived in Chicago I used to ride up to Beaver Damn Wisconsin to get tires and sometimes to have service done to the RT. It was a nice little ride for great service with great people at Mischler's BMW. They had a little container of these stickers on the front counter. It seemed like a good idea to have one on the helmet, front and back.

 

Once, while riding to Torrey, RonB was slowly catching up to me somewhere in southern Utah. He said he knew it was me because he could see the stickers on my black helmet from afar. :grin:

 

In my case, one of my witnesses is an off duty paramedic and he was pivotal in my care at the scene. I will never forget hearing his words "I'm a rider". That brought me comfort. I knew a brother had ahold of me.

 

 

The only place I found anything like it on line was at Iron Horse Helmets:

http://www.ironhorsehelmets.com/in-case-of-accident-do-not-remove-helmet-motorcycle-helmet-sticker/

But the one they show isn't nearly as nice as the one Kathy had.

 

I was able to determine that the one Kathy had was from the State of Wisconson's DOT Motorcycle Safety Program.

 

http://search.wi.gov/query.html?qt=motorcycle+helmet+decals&charset=iso-8859-1&style=dot&qp=url%3Awww.dot.wisconsin.gov&col=wigov&col=wik12&col=videos&col=edu2&col=legal&col=wilocal&col=wilib&col=wiother&col=edu&col=statewi&col=wile&col=wiscon

 

They distribute them under their Motorcycle Safety Material Requests. But it looks like they only give them to folks taking their course. :(

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Wow, thanks George!

 

I went to the WI Dept of Trans site and got the email for this fellow. Does anyone know if he is any relation to Carol? I sent him an email.

 

For more information contact:

Greg Patzer, Wisconsin Motorcycle Safety Program manager, Wisconsin Department of Transportation

(608) 266-7855; gregory.patzer@dot.wi.gov

 

 

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Nice n Easy Rider
Wow, thanks George!

 

I went to the WI Dept of Trans site and got the email for this fellow. Does anyone know if he is any relation to Carol? I sent him an email.

 

For more information contact:

Greg Patzer, Wisconsin Motorcycle Safety Program manager, Wisconsin Department of Transportation

(608) 266-7855; gregory.patzer@dot.wi.gov

 

 

PM sent

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I know these stickers are unsightly. Any of you who know me recognize that form follows function with me. I can say that you are a lot less likely to have your helmet stolen if it has a bright orange sticker on it. :grin:

 

My next helmet will have a sticker on the forehead and at the nap of the neck, just the same as all my helmets for the past 11 years. I was lucky in that an off duty EMT got to me first. The next person to attend to me was another motorist, a medical doctor. She was holding my feet still at the ankles. I realized that they were interested in keeping me straight and still. I understood the importance for that, so I was cooperating as best as I could. At some point she YANKED on my boot, as if to remove it. To her, an obvious non rider, a boot came off like a snow boot and a good yank ought to do it. Well, I let out quite a scream. Being the controlling person I can be, especially where I am concerned, I believe I screamed all the instructions for motorcycle boot removal, for the next 5 minutes. :mad:

 

Yes, I think about what would have happened had she been the only one there and had she tried to remove my flip face helmet. One good yank? OMG.

 

I recently READ THIS . It brought home to me that sometimes it is just LUCK, but we have the option to control as much as we can.....As much as we can.

 

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Kathy, this is a fantastic story and I'm certainly glad that you are on the mend! It is amazing the number of motorists that are incredibly motorcycle friendly and the number that think we are all hells angels. Sorry that you had to encounter one of the latter. I look forward to seeing you out on the road again when the time is right.

 

For those that were looking I found this link for the "don't remove helmet" stickers.

Helmet Removal

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Hi Kathy,

 

Thanks for the reearch heads up on the helmet sticker.I'll be interested in the outcome of the on-going search for these goodies.

 

Maybe someone on this board is in the "sticker" business and can make some up for us.

 

Glad also you were first attended by an EMT who is also a rider and understands about helmets and potential neck injuries with helmet removal.

 

Francis

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Thanks and THANKS James :wave:

 

I like the idea of Blood Type being on the sticker. In my case it's one more reason why someone wouldn't steal my helmet. AB+ :grin:

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Don't know how I missed this thread. But I know how it feels to hit the asphalt at speed. I'll have a "special hug" for you at the UN..

 

 

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Thanks and THANKS James :wave:

 

I like the idea of Blood Type being on the sticker. In my case it's one more reason why someone wouldn't steal my helmet. AB+ :grin:

 

I don't mean to HIJACK the thread..but I have contacted a friend of mine in the DECAL business. He thinks he can make this stickers customized and reasonably priced. I will create a new thread once I have all the information.

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