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Mounting tires yourself?


oldironhead

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oldironhead

I just got the front wheel off my r11rt, thinking I could change the tire with my trusty old hand tire irons. I used to change all my tires myself this way.

 

This looks like a bigger job than I had anticipated. That tire is very stiff, and those wheels look real easy to booger up with the irons. Even breaking the bead is going to be a challenge. And I hadn't even thought about balancing it. I used to never worry about balancing a tire.

 

Give it a try, or forget what I used to do and take it to the dealer? Anyone change their own tires, and what do you use to do the job?

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RAMBLIN RED

I bought a bead breaker from Superstore and use tire irons. Works well once bead is broken.

The PR-2s that I installed didn't have the yellow mark for positioning and surprising as it seems, needed no further balancing

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Can be very easy or very difficult, it's all in the technique (which admittedly takes a while to build.). The R1100RT isn't really that tough at all, try a wide, low-profile tire like the rear on a K-GT or S... that's a challenge.

 

That said, if you've got a Cycle Gear or other $20 alternative around that's the way to go (although in terms of rim damage CG and dealer service departments have done more harm than I ever have.)

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mikeR1100R

$15!!! Max BMW just charged me $85 for mounting my 2 new PR 2's. That, coupled with the fact that there are 2 bikes in the family now made me determined to start mounting my own tires. I even bought the tires from Max! That was wheels off the bike too!

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A long and short 2x4, the bottom of a trailor hitch or your car and you can break the bead. Long 2x4 horizontal, one end up against the bottom of the car. Second short 2x4 vertical under the horizontal 2x4 which is you lever. Wheel under vertical 2x4 that is pressing down on the tire close to the rim, lever down, break bead. Leather strips or a cut up milk container for rim protectors. You tube how to bread a bead.

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$15!!! Max BMW just charged me $85 for mounting my 2 new PR 2's. That, coupled with the fact that there are 2 bikes in the family now made me determined to start mounting my own tires. I even bought the tires from Max! That was wheels off the bike too!

 

Max charges only $15 more to bring in the whole bike. I thought I could save more by bringing in just the wheels. I figured that extra $15 was well worth my time dismounting the wheels.

 

Max did have a good price on the PR3's that I bought. All said and done I think they were my cheapest option. Plus I got to test ride some new bikes while they changed them out!

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A long and short 2x4, the bottom of a trailor hitch or your car and you can break the bead. Long 2x4 horizontal, one end up against the bottom of the car. Second short 2x4 vertical under the horizontal 2x4 which is you lever. Wheel under vertical 2x4 that is pressing down on the tire close to the rim, lever down, break bead. Leather strips or a cut up milk container for rim protectors. You tube how to bread a bead.

 

Yep, quite easy. A Short 2x4 and a bottle jack works good in this arrangement too.

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If you choose to change them yourself, as I do, I can provide you with a comprehensive list of the curse words that work best for me. :rofl:

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My local shop (not a bmw dealer) mounts and balances tires for FREE when you buy the tire, and bring in just the wheel.

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biometrics

Harbor Freight sells a functional motorcycle bead breaker... watch for a sale. I paid $29 for mine... Leave the tires in the sun, or I just discovered that if I leave the tire in my car or van in the sun all day, it gets a lot more pliable.

 

I have used 3 short pieces of 2x4 arranged in a triangle on the ground on which to change front tire from the R1100RT without damaging the rotors... I used the 24" tire irons from HF... cost only $5 each on sale. I use pieces of plastic cut from a gallon milk jug or bleach/liquid detergent bottle or shampoo bottle, to keep the rim from getting scratched by the tire irons when removing or installing the tire and some soapy water for lube.

 

This is a low tech solution, and can be done alone, but is easier with a helper...

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Antimatter

Leaving the old and the new tires in the sun can be a big help, as long as they aren't DOT race tires (which get stickier when they're hot). I use the Harbor Freight tire changer (which I understand they don't sell anymore) and a No-Mar mount/dismount bar. If you own multiple bikes and do several changes a year, a permanent set-up will pay for itself in a short amount of time. No-Mar sells a Cycle Hill tire changer for $465 that looks like a good deal for the money.

 

Locally, the lowest cost shop I know of charges $25 per wheel (off the bike) and you have to buy the tires from them. Meaning you're getting dinged for an extra $20 - $30 per tire because you can't order from discount places on line. Five tire changes and you'd be looking at a tire changing machine cost. Changing your own will allow you to stockpile tires when they're on sale, and you can patch your own tires if you want to (most shops won't patch and MC tire).

 

 

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oldironhead

Well, I finally tackled the job. I used a MacGyver method with a 2x4, some wood blocks, and my truck, to break the beads loose. My little 8" tire irons did the job fine. Those tires are easier to work off and on than I thought they would be... way easier than some of the old spoked wheels.

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Peter Parts

Been 43 years since I last tried to change tires under the shade tree. Rims are soft... and expensive. Over the years, sidewalls have changed (which is why old BMW tire pressure ratings aren't right).

 

Wouldn't think of not having the shop do a dynamic balance too. I used to always verify the balance on my own stand, but no longer.

 

But one thing is for sure. I want to the be hand that attaches the wheels to the bike. Even it your shop re-mounts the wheels, double-check the bolts (which for me means anti-sieze and non-heroic torque levels, as well as making sure all the pieces are in place). When it comes to safety issues, you are your own best friend.

 

We have a guy in Toronto who does almost nothing else but bike tire mounting.

 

Ben

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...find local bike riders that have a tire changer and buy them a beer.

 

I do changes for folks that ask me nicely...and bring the beer...

 

Of course, you're a little too far away....

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...find local bike riders that have a tire changer and buy them a beer.

 

I do changes for folks that ask me nicely...and bring the beer...

 

Of course, you're a little too far away....

 

hmmm.... but I'm not! Stepson is in Tampa... let's make a dear ;-)

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hmmm.... but I'm not! Stepson is in Tampa... let's make a dear ;-)

 

 

 

Hmmmmmm....spooning for tire spoons?

 

------

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No-Mar sells a Cycle Hill tire changer for $465 that looks like a good deal for the money.

 

With multiple bikes, it became a necessity to buy a tire changer. I went with the Cycle Hill changer and haven't regretted it. While you can change tires without it, the CH changer just makes it so much easier, you don't want to go back once you've used it.

 

As long as people take their old rubber with them (or I have room ... the city bulk trash collection takes up to four tires every six months for free), I will help change out tires for free. I'm sure there are others depending on where you live that do the same thing.

 

Wayne

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