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Replacing the clutch cable on a 2000 R1100RT


Don Beissel

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Don Beissel

#$%!@#$ @#$%@# @#$%@#$%#$%^#$&^ #$%^##@$%@#$%@!!!!!!!!

 

Today I spent the whole day replacing brake pads and the brake lines on my 2000 R 1100 RT. I took off the tupperware, scooted back the tank and replaced all the lines with new stainless steel lines and put all new brake pads on while I was at it. I bled it out at the ABS unit and the brakes. Heck, I even washed the dirt out of the inside of the tupperware while it was off the bike.

 

She was ready to ride again after 2 weeks on the center stand while I found and installed all new brake lines.

 

I took the bike off the center stand and was moving it around to start it up and go for a test ride on the brakes. Then my whole damn day was ruined.

 

I pulled in the clutch to start her and SNAP!!!

 

The MFing clutch cable broke at the handle.

 

I hate this. Where do I find a new one, and what is the easy way to replace it?

 

I miss riding sooooo bad. This just has me bummed out.

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Don Beissel

OK. I have it ordered from beemer boneyard.

 

Any good tricks for an easy install? I have the right tupperware off and have found the routing.

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One thing you may want to watch for upon installation is any kind of misalignment or rubbing of the bare cable at either end because it sounds like that may be possible in your case. Absent these issues a clutch cable should last a very long time, for instance I still have the original cable on my 1100RT and at 130k miles it looks almost like new. Not saying there is necessarily a problem on your bike, but there is perhaps a reason to be suspicious enough to give it a close look.

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Evening Don

 

Look at exactly where your cable broke. If it broke at the area where it exits the cable housing then see Seth's post above. If it broke right at the barrel in the lever that probably means the barrel was tight or seized in the lever & couldn't rotate as the lever was stroked. That forces the cable to flex right at the entrance to the barrel & they won't last long flexing in that area.

 

A for cable installation-- not much too it, just keep digging until you can access & get to it. I usually tie a string on the old cable before removing it to help guide the replacement back into place as it is slid in.

 

 

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That sucks. I remember the last time I had one snap on me. It went one strand at a time. The first strand snapped leaving work when stopping at the first traffic light. I live 57 miles from my job, so I did everything in my power to not touch that lever unless it was absolutely necessary. I made it home with one strand hanging on for dear life. The next day (with replacement cable in hand), I pulled the lever 2-3 more times and it finally snapped completely.

 

For replacement. I taped the new cable to the end of the old one and just pulled it through. Make sure to read up on the proper clutch cable adjustment section in your repair manual. If you adjust it incorrectly it can cause more problems.

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Don Beissel

Everyone says to tape it together and pull it through. I don't get how that works. I bought the whole cable from Beemer Bonyard and do not see how it is going to come through.

 

I also do not see how to get the cable free of the metal ring near the clutch lever.

 

How do I replace the whole thing. I might as well do it before a half arsed job causes me more trouble.

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The cable end at/in the lever needs to rotate ~45-deg counterclockwise to allow it to drop out the bottom. You can tape the end of the new cable to the broken ends sheath. This lets you pull the new cable in and follow the same routing as the old cable. The last clutch cable I changed was a month ago, on the side of the road.

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I also do not see how to get the cable free of the metal ring near the clutch lever.

 

How do I replace the whole thing. I might as well do it before a half arsed job causes me more trouble.

 

Go to the back of the transmission and make your adjustment as loose as possible. Then you can push in the actuating lever and unhook the cable there. Then youll be able to unhook at the lever and remove it. I did not do the "tape and pull through" but I did leave the old cable in place as I routed the new one so I could see where it went.

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Danny caddyshack Noonan

As most of the other posts, tape. Tape the lower end of the new cable to the upper end of the old cable. I use blue painters tape. Works ok, easy removal....compared to duct or gorilla tape. Pull the cable down through the bike from the lower end. You will see it when the new end shows up.

 

While you are waiting for the new cable, remove the barrel from the clutch handle and take a good look at the setup there to help understand how the system goes together and adjusts. Set it up for maximum slack per an above post. Then, get some solvent/brakecleen or anything that will cut grease and doesn't leave a residue. Clean the large hole in the clutch handle that holds the barrel end of the cable. Make sure there are no hard bits of dirt sticking to the side walls in there. It is critical that this is clean and then regreased prior to installation of the new cable. Lack of barrel rotation, as the lever moves, is the primary cause of clutch cable failures. If the cable wires have to bend at that location, they will fatigue.

 

When you reinstall, the whole cable just barely goes together when the adjustments are at max slack. IIRC, I used a tool (pry bar or similar) to force the lower lever forward into a good position to engage the lower cable end. I think this was after getting the top end in. This is where the looksee and understanding of the adjustments is important. BTW, after years of dirtbikes, I always try to have a spare in the garage.

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Don Beissel

It occurred to me today that I am lucky to have 2 crippling and potentially dangerous breakdowns happen IN MY GARAGE, and not 20 miles from home.

 

I could have crashed or been stranded by both of these things. Now I have new steel brake lines and will have a brand new clutch cable soon.

 

What else should I just replace on my 12 year old bike?

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What else should I just replace on my 12 year old bike?

 

Hall effect sensor ASAP, and the drivehsaft and paralever bearings when you reach 100K miles.

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