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Retirement Looms Quickly


AdventurePoser

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AdventurePoser

Well, I thought I had it all figured. Numbers checked, financial planner giving me a huge two thumbs up, health good (AFAIK), Retirement system paperwork all good and approved, health and medical paid thru the next 4.5 years, new car purchased in July (2013 Subaru Outback), and riding and travel plans made through December of 2014.

 

So why am I so nervous?

 

I am beginning a new life with major changes on several fronts, and I'm starting to get cold feet! I know I shouldn't but, still getting scared...

 

How about you recently retired folks? Any bumps along the road? Caveats? Things to watchout for? Words of wisdom?

 

22 days to go, and there is no turning back!

 

Steve in So Cal

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Marty Hill

Steve you will love it! It's probably harder for guys who took their job seriously like you do. Enjoy a long and happy life after work. It really is a wonderful time.

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Dave McReynolds

Same here Steve. Just finished my last busy season as a CPA. Not sure what I'm going to do yet when I grow up. Fortunately for me, I guess, is that I can ease into it, as I will have some CPA work to finish over the rest of the year. But I do feel some detached anxieties, as being a CPA is what has largely defined me for the past 40 years.

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Well, I thought I had it all figured. Numbers checked, financial planner giving me a huge two thumbs up, health good (AFAIK), Retirement system paperwork all good and approved, health and medical paid thru the next 4.5 years, new car purchased in July (2013 Subaru Outback), and riding and travel plans made through December of 2014.

 

So why am I so nervous?

 

I am beginning a new life with major changes on several fronts, and I'm starting to get cold feet! I know I shouldn't but, still getting scared...

 

 

 

How about you recently retired folks? Any bumps along the road? Caveats? Things to watchout for? Words of wisdom?

 

22 days to go, and there is no turning back!

 

Steve in So Cal

 

 

I wish that I could help you. I was in a similar position about five years ago and started a relatively new career as soon as I retired. Still working with no desire to stop. I have too many old friends of a similar age to me who stopped working ...and shortly after stopped living. Do what feels right to you, and don't look back!

 

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Well Steve I'll be watching this thread with equal interest. We've been doing some planning over the last several months meeting with an advisor and, although I still find it shocking, he says we can do this retirement thing. I'm tentatively shooting for 10 or 11 months from now but I know what you mean about some second thoughts. I went to work 45 years ago and, despite some lousy jobs along the way, I haven't been unemployed since. It's an odd feeling. Good luck to you.

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Stop worrying Steve, I'm sure you'll love it once you readjust to the No Work thing.

I retire 5 1/2 years ago at age 58, after 35 years on the job, and let me tell you, it's been nothing short of GREAT.

The first 6 months or so were a bit scary until we actually saw how the $$ flow was going. As it turned out, it was just fine. Other than that nasty work thing, our lifestyle/spending habits have not changed one iota.

Good Luck, continued Good Health and ENJOY!!!!

 

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Steve, if you feel the need to work come and do mine, I'll be happy to let you have it so that I can go hiking with Biff. I'm so envious of you!

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AdventurePoser

Hi guys...thanks for the input! I think the only financial question I still have unanswered is exactly how much additional fed and state income tax I should have withheld from my monthly pension check...I signed up for the standard 20%, but I know I'll have to withhold additional funds to avoid the giant "donation" on April 17! :dopeslap:

 

I think my main focus needs to be not to overanalyzing the situation. I've had jobs I absolutely love for the past 36 years, but I also have places I want to visit, and many miles to hopefully ride as well. People like Marty Hill are my inspiration!

 

So, Plan A is to be busy...

 

First a cruise, leaving the day after I retire. Never been on a cruise before

 

Then a moto tour of Nor Cal, OR, and WA to visit grandchildren.

 

I'll follow that by touring the intermountain west in July. I hope to see everyone at the Unrally, though I am not registered officially (didn't know I could attend this event until today!)

 

Then, a month tour of the Deep South, "In Search of Smoke," a bbq tour of small town southern eateries

 

In November, I'm off to Tahiti. It's an island. It's surrounded by water. I'm underwhelmed, except the trip is FREE, so that works for me!

 

In the spring, a month in Southeast Asia...Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Hong Kong and a bit of China.

 

I think for me, it'll be best to stay busy! Too much to think about otherwise.

 

Steve

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interesting thread for me. My personal hero's (besides parents and a few teachers) has been succesful people doing what they love in thier 80's and even some into thier 90's. Noticed I said what they love not working. I think there is a huge difference. A big "mentor" of mine was John Wooden. His books, prymid of success and outlook on life have influenced me tremendously. He was lecturing until at least his early 90's. My goal has alwasy been to be productive to societly until I am dead. I do sometimes fantazy about riding 40 weeks out of the year. Or being able to travel in the "off season" and getting to really enjoy unknown parts of this world. But I always seem to come back to an equally appealing idea of making a difference right at home. I have always like the saying, "think global, act local" But lately reading some of the threads about dual sport riding in Utah, or Idaho etc have me wondering if in a few more years I will feel different. I go to the office every day, and maybe one day a month I feel like I am going to "work". The rest of the time I look forward to each days opportunities. When I was young, just starting out in the business world I still remember my Dad telling me, "most of us have to work were we work and what we do is what we control". It took me a number of years, and some hard knocks to understand what he was saying. However I finally figured it out, and I would say the last 15 years have been pretty exciting. Currently I cannot imagine enjoying life more than I do so now. but these recent retirement threads have made me look at situations differently. who knows another 15 years and I might have a different view.

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I got tired just reading about your plans.

 

I've had no trouble keeping busy. I sometimes have to remind myself that a particular task does not need to be finished immediately.

 

I started to use some of my personal and sick days the last couple of years. I gave me a taste of what it would be like. Prior to that I would never take days off. I had a nine year stretch when I never missed a day. I suspect you might be a bit like that, a go to work everyday no matter what kind of person.

 

I did have a spike in spending, but that was when I moved, settled in, picked up some new toys, and fixed the new house to my liking.

 

I'm so glad I did it while I'm still able to do fun things...like a track day next week! :thumbsup:

 

 

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Steve, It shouldn't take long, Soon you will be an old hand.

 

On the other foot , my adviser suggests that I work till I be 72 years old than find a part time job. I wish he were kidding

Edited by Tank
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I retired after 36 years and moved away from a home of 30 years all in the same month.

BEST thing I ever did.

I did miss a few things but joined the Emmett Rotary Club to stay busy and meet new friends. I suggest you might try that. I find giving to my community often keeps me busy.

I bought a atv for winter riding.. No more worrying about crashing on a icy corner on my motorcycles.. Best part is Now I can spot an Elk at 2500 yards. I couldn't shoot that far but I can sure see them tempting me... My riding crowd has changed to friends with atv's and not too many bmw's.. just an idaho thing..

 

a wise man once told me " It doesn't get any easier to retire if I wait longer ".

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I retired in '05, hated it and went back to work.

I grew tired of washing the car, watching tv and mowing the lawn.

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My motto, which I borrowed from someone else, is "every day is a Saturday."

 

That said, I made the mistake of retiring FROM something instead of retiring TO something. I took an early retirement because I was burned out and disgusted with the way my company was being run. This type of retirement is known for having people die in the first two years because they become less social and less active. Luckily, I wasn't all that social to begine with and now my wife is retiring and will be available to make sure I stay active on all the projects she has planned that "we" need to do.

 

Because the recession stated just after I retired, my main function has been to not spend money and let my investments recover. But between seeing old friends, riding the motorcycle, going to the gym, home repairs, and taking continuing ed classes, I'm filling up my days with a low level of spending. I haven't fallen back on Habitat for Humanity or Meals of Wheels; nor have I looked into the greeter job at Walmart.

 

-----

 

 

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AdventurePoser

Wurty, moving is another thing I am considering, but I've been counseled to NOT make too many big decisions the first year. I found a great place in Nor Cal on 11 acres, with river frontage, but it is very remote, at least compared to what I am used to. So, I'll hold of on moving for the time being.

 

Quinn, retiring TO something is critical. I still have a love for working with at risk kids, but I believe I'll spend a year travelin the world and riding before I look at jumping back into the work world...

 

Thanks for your thoughts, everyone!

 

Steve

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I retired in '05, hated it and went back to work.

I grew tired of washing the car, watching tv and mowing the lawn.

So why did you limit yourself to those things? There's a whole world out there!

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I "retired" at the end of 2008. I can't say that I am any less busy, or have any shorter list of things that need to be done. However, it's very nice to do things on my schedule, rather than one that leaves only Saturday and Sunday for personal projects. In some ways, my present status is a lull between careers, as I expect to be running a B&B within the next 2 years, so in a sense I will be retireing "to" a new career. The past three weeks were spent doing most of the cooking and a lot of deferred maintenance, but with an 1865 house, something always needs fixing, so I expect to stay busy for the next 20 years. Riffing on a Maggie Smith line from Downton Abbey, "What's a weekend?"

 

I probably won't be able to do nearly as much riding as I would like (Delaware is one of the suckiest places in the country for riding, unless you have a HD with apehangers and enjoy riding in a straight line), but staying busy is probably the least of my worries. At least with a 4-story, 1865 house, I will get plenty of exercise climbing stairs — I lost 2 pounds over the past three weeks, despite eating out for most meals.

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Steve, you guy's wil hate it. You will run out of money and have to get a job at Walmart :wave: Linda and I will see you in Salida. I've been looking for work now for 12 years. Thank goodness no one want's to hire old guy's. Marty knows how to work this retirement thing :thumbsup:

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markgoodrich

I quit five years ago. The most difficult thing is the loss of daily contact with people...in my case, the work relationships dropped completely off within a month. I had to work hard at meeting new people and making new friends. It's paid off.

 

Here's the BEST THING I did when I retired: I contacted a couple people I knew, not close friends, as didn't want it to turn into a social gathering, and suggested they contact a couple people, all of whom were either retired, thinking about it, or wishing for it. The focus was to talk about the issues surrounding what is arguably the third most important change in our lives. It worked. It wasn't group therapy, but it was therapeutic, as we spent several meetings talking about all the fears and concerns one might encounter. And..as I had hoped, as we gradually ran out of issues to worry at, we realized that the core group (guys will come and go) had become good friends. We don't meet as often any more, but when we do we greatly enjoy our time together, and we also get together individually for social outings. These days we're trying a new gig, choosing two TED talks to watch and then discuss at the next gathering.

 

The other thing: stay physically active, and GET SOME YOUNGER FRIENDS. You'll be glad you did the hard work to accomplish that. (This entire community self-selects to an active lifestyle, but as an example, most of my long-time "personal" friends spend their time talking about their doctor visits or their aches and pains...you get the picture).

 

The other, other thing: if you are wondering if you can afford to retire, and are willing to spend some hours puzzling out a software program and feeding it accurate data, I highly recommend ESPlanner Plus, found at ESPlaner.com. I used it to determine whether I could walk out the door. In the intervening five years, the projections it provided have been very accurate. I have no affiliation, yadda....

 

HTH.

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I had to work hard at meeting new people and making new friends. It's paid off.

 

I think he means us :dopeslap:

 

Looks like ESPlaner.com has retired...

 

(ESPlanner.com works though)

Edited by Killer
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Couchrocket

The Cure:

 

1. Set your alarm clock for the same early rise time on that first Monday of retirement.

2. Set 16 oz. framing hammer next to alarm.

3. Go to bed.

4. When alarm goes off, beat it to smithereens with hammer. Laugh. Go back to sleep.

5. When you wake up fully refreshed go for a ride.

6. Take it from there. It's fun.

 

 

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RichEdwards

I retired from teaching in 1998 after 30 years. Since then

I have traveled the country in an RV for three years, been to every state but Hawaii on my motorcycle, visited Bermuda, Jamaica, Mexico, Ireland, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, moved to FL from NY because I don't like winter, helped raise my granddaughter. Whew!

Those who don't know what they will do after working a job are woefully lacking in imagination.

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AdventurePoser
I retired from teaching in 1998 after 30 years. Since then

I have traveled the country in an RV for three years, been to every state but Hawaii on my motorcycle, visited Bermuda, Jamaica, Mexico, Ireland, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, moved to FL from NY because I don't like winter, helped raise my granddaughter. Whew!

Those who don't know what they will do after working a job are woefully lacking in imagination.

 

Ok, I think I'm beginning to get the picture! Scott, I like the idea of smashing the alarm clock....it could be very therapeutic.

 

See you in Salida!

 

Steve

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majrosebud

Steve,

 

You've done good preparing for this new chapter. At least it's not chapter 13. I am scared, too. I think it's the isolation from my friends at work I'll miss the most.

Edited by majrosebud
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Steve,

 

There's always substitute teaching.

 

 

 

 

:rofl:

:wave:

 

 

Now you get to find out who you are .

 

Best wishes.

Edited by tallman
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AdventurePoser
Steve,

 

You've done good preparing for this new chapter. At least it's not chapter 13. I am scared, too. I think it's the isolation from my friends at work I'll miss the most.

 

In a nutshell, this is it!

 

Cheers,

Steve

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markgoodrich
I had to work hard at meeting new people and making new friends. It's paid off.

 

I think he means us :dopeslap:

 

Looks like ESPlaner.com has retired...

 

(ESPlanner.com works though)

 

Yes, I mean "us" but also new friends here in Austin, unrelated to motorcycling. "Us" hasn't paid off quite so well, as it's hard to get someone to pick up the check on a forum.

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Harry_Wilshusen
The Cure:

 

1. Set your alarm clock for the same early rise time on that first Monday of retirement.

2. Set 16 oz. framing hammer next to alarm.

3. Go to bed.

4. When alarm goes off, beat it to smithereens with hammer. Laugh. Go back to sleep.

5. When you wake up fully refreshed go for a ride.

6. Take it from there. It's fun.

 

 

That didn't work for me. I still wake up at 5am. I guess I could use the hammer to hit myself in the head.

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The Cure:

 

1. Set your alarm clock for the same early rise time on that first Monday of retirement.

2. Set 16 oz. framing hammer next to alarm.

3. Go to bed.

4. When alarm goes off, beat it to smithereens with hammer. Laugh. Go back to sleep.

5. When you wake up fully refreshed go for a ride.

6. Take it from there. It's fun.

 

 

I remember reading a story somewhere a long time ago about a machinist in the UK who had been working for something like 50 years. When retirement day finally came he took his alarm clock to work, put it in a 50 ton press and flattened it. I'll bet I read that over 30 years ago but I still get a kick out of it when I think of it.

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Take up Astronomy and Astrophotography..you won't have time for anything else, let alone get any sleep.

 

Remember: "Astronomers stay up and do it all night."

Edited by SKYGZR
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AdventurePoser
Take up Astronomy and Astrophotography..you won't have time for anything else, let alone get any sleep.

 

Remember: "Astronomers stay up and do it all night."

 

Do you have a picture of the Milky Way with an arrow that says "You are Here."? Sounds like a great hobby. I remember chartering a 48 foot sailboat and being about 100 miles off the coast, and watching the stars...or backpacking in the Sierras at 11,000 feet. The sky seems so star filled, that it looks like cotton candy spread across the sky!

 

Steve

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Steve, I sometimes stop to wonder how I ever had time to work for a living! I am busy, but at a slower pace.

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baggerchris

My boss asked me not to retire. My wife said that I could "never" retire.

 

I retired at 62 and was bored to death. I now work one or two days a week and am very happy for now, but am now also slowing down and can see that by the time I reach 66, I will be ready to "hit the road" and travel; Jeep; and skuba dive, along with riding.

 

I think the biggest thing I am glad to see go is the responsibility of management. I now just come in; do work; give advice when asked and then GO HOME. I get to do yard work on our ten acres of forest, and ride just about anytime I want.

 

I wrenched my left shoulder three months ago which has taught me that at 64, I cannot do the same things I did when I was younger, and that is ok. I think complete retirement is great for those who feel like that is what they want, but I find the one or two days of work a week keeps my mind fresher than if I didn't, and as we get older, Alzheimer's becomes a definite threat to be avoided at all costs if you can.

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AdventurePoser

I agree about keeping the mind fresh...I enjoy writing and talking with younger people, and am really looking forward to some really long rides this summer. Keeping active is the key.

 

I've already been offered three jobs, and politely declined them all...first some travel, and then maybe go back to work, at least on a limited basis! :clap:

 

Steve

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  • 8 years later...

Just read through this 2012 thread for the first time.   Lots of good advice for those of us that are retired.  Particularly the suggestion that I have adapted of waching TED talks almost daily.

 

I retired in July '19 after practicing dentistry for 50 years (26 years of which was in the US Navy). Spent the first 8 months helping my daughter and son-in-law do a major upgrade to their home in Incline, NV.  Returned home to DC the end of February '20 just in time for the start of the Covidvirus pandemic that hit us here in the USA.   Because of health issues that put my wife, daughter and myself at high risk the three of us and my son-in-law are all sheldering in place at our home in DC.   We all get along well but not always easy for 4 strong minded individuals in the same house all day - everyday!  

 

I had hoped to take many long motorcycle trips but have been limited to short day rides with no stops other than for gas.    

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The Pandemic has changed my wife's retirement plans! We were ready to give up her income in March......

 

Well, with the Covid 19 lockdown what are you going to do? While we can do some (safe) traveling in the motorhome, it just isn't the same if you cannot go explore local restaurants and sights worth seeing. 

 

So she is still working. For now. Which makes retirement more fruitful, but our plan was to retire early enough to enjoy ourselves. We have a nice place that is kind of secluded. I have my shop that is 23 steps from the back of the house. I can only imagine what it must be like to live in an apartment or condo and try to keep from going stir crazy! My wife and I get along better than almost any couple could hope. This is proving that, yet I sense a bit of space is needed at times. That is what the shop and yard work are good for. I have not been riding.....I think I need to take a Saturday or Sunday and do that. Give her some time alone! 

 

Who would have thought a trip to the grocery store about every two weeks would be a big event!

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Terry....well that darned virus has sure reeked havoc on my retirement plans and yours.  One thing that turned out different for me than expected was STUFF.  As most of us do we had acquired many things over the years...beach house, boat(s), airplane, and of course motorcycles.  Now that I've been retired for a year, I decided I didn't want or need most of those things.  They were actually a burden on enjoyment rather than bringing pleasure.  When working I guess they were an outlet with the little time I had to play.  Loved them all.

 

Since March I've sold my airplane (20 years of ownership), beach house (10 years), and boats (multiple years).  It is a great relief to be out of those things that I thought would be how I spent my retirement but it wasn't. They were a burden.

 

I still love to fish.  I go to the coast and use a guide.  For $850day I catch limits of trout, reds, flounder, etc.  When we are done I get off the boat and go home.  It's great.  Nothing to clean, nothing to register, nothing to insure, nothing to do maintenance on, etc.

 

Much like you we are considering a motorhome to do some travel, but will wait until 2021 to see how this Covid mess works out.  I know the numbers are controversial but here is todays report.

 

Hang tight...we have probably the better part of a year before this mess substantially clears up.

 

If you want to do some riding..I'm up for that on days it's not 100+ here.  

 

If I had your shop....that would be a big plus for me.

covid.jpg

covid2.jpg

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David, you can figure on a ride somewhere sooner than later. Some kind of day trip. 

 

Stuff...sigh....I am going to sell my Lightning F 150. Bought that new 20 years ago. Need the room....to get my 65 Mustang project going full bore. While that seems like taking on more, and it most certainly is, it also will clean up the boxes and boxes of parts in both garages. So I can get those in perfect shape sooner than later. I have been getting rid of some stuff that I would not have considered doing a few years ago. It can be a relief to get rid of "stuff".....I need to remember that!

 

"I still love to fish.  I go to the coast and use a guide.  For $850 day I catch limits of trout, reds, flounder, etc.  When we are done I get off the boat and go home.  It's great.  Nothing to clean, nothing to register, nothing to insure, nothing to do maintenance on, etc."

 

That may seem like a lot. Not so much with someone else or a few sharing....But I can tell you for a fact that it probably works out cheaper than owning even an average well equipped fishing boat! 22-28 ft boats cost a LOT to store, maintain. Beyond that costs are astronomical. As you are now confirming.....washing and looking after stuff is a bigger burden than it is worth in too many cases!

 

Motorhome....we need to talk if you are serious. I think in this event of Pandemic it is the only way I would travel. We have a 50+ lb Standard Poodle, meaning hotel rooms are not always happy to see you ( she is quieter than I am but they don't know that! ). I can carry the RT on the back of the motorhome and the Jeep has logged several thousand miles behind it on the tow bar. Ours is set up so you can do everything in it without moving out any slides. Pull into a rest stop and fix a meal, watch tv, go to bed. Full size fridge and freezer, so you can pack a couple weeks worth of viddles ( I know you know what that means being a Clampett! ) and never have to leave the coach. We are more comfortable in it than in a hotel room. It does have drawbacks of course, but if time is no factor that can actually add to the enjoyment!

 

 

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I retired 2 years ago and boy am I glad I did. Everything paid for but damn it’s still expensive to live. Had riding trips planned but everyone knows what happened there. I just turned 64 so hopefully I still have time after Covid and African weather clears. Hell its even too hot for me to ride locally. Staying busy with landscaping, painting inside of home, and totally redoing master closet. Projects I’ve wanted to get to for a while now. My garage (no shop) has ac so I can fart around out there. Highlight of my day? My leisurely cup of coffee with my digital local newspaper on my iPad and watching Paw Patrol with my 2 yr old granddaughter. :4907:I still have my health so far so yes life is good. I highly recommend retirement if you’re sure you can swing it. 

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Guess I'm getting old.  Retired 29 years ago at 55.  Began riding at 59 when I sold my last plane.  Bike is the next best fun provider.

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4 hours ago, Skywagon said:

Now that I've been retired for a year, I decided I didn't want or need most of those things.  They were actually a burden on enjoyment rather than bringing pleasure.

 

I have been arguing with my mother about this for decades, and it's actually gotten worse, as she has turned into a compulsive hoarder over the past decade. This is but a small fraction, perhaps 5%, of her lamp hoard.

 

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About 10 days into a ride to Alaska in 2006, I said to myself, "Why am I working 45-50 hours/week when I could be doing this?" I like my job, but a friend once said to me, "Working is like riding a donkey with two saddlebags. One saddlebag is being filled with gold; the other with manure. When your donkey falls over one way or the other, or just collapses under the load, it's time to get off." I had met all my financial and professional goals, and decided that unless my new boss (who started the day I got back from Alaska) thrilled me, I would be out of there on December 31, 2008. He didn't, I was. My wife followed me out in 2012.

 

We have no regrets. Moving from Atlanta to Dahlonega in 2017 reduced our expenses by about $10,000/year. Sold the wife's Grom last year, and the RT this spring, leaving 2 motorcycles in the garage. My wife wants me to get a second car or a truck; I'm resisting.

 

In this part of Georgia it's been pretty easy to distance ourselves physically from others, apart from the occasional trip to Walmart, or once a week to the nearest supermarkets, ~22 miles east in Cleveland, or to the south near Dawsonville. 

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Before anyone up and moves to CA for their golden years in the golden state, consider your fire risk when living in 'natural' areas that are wooded, brushy, or adjacent to such areas.  Here's a little back ground on CA fires.  https://www.vox.com/2018/8/7/17661096/california-wildfires-2018-camp-woolsey-climate-change .   They are trending bigger and deadlier.  I won't go into the details of why other than to say no one sees any change in the situation for the next several decades.  One source of several CA fires has been power lines which have endured chronic maintenance neglect.  The largest state electric utility had to declare bankruptcy over damages and life loss caused by their lines.  Now, at even a hint of hot dry wind, they shut down the grid to 100,000's of customers for days on end.  Plan to have a good plan for reducing fuels on your 11 acres (which may alter the ambiance), having a good escape plan, and having to buy and use a very big electric generator.

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Red....I already escaped.  Lived there 20 years.  Our last house was built after the Oakland Hills fire of 1991.  I had enough fire, flood, shake and bake, and taxes to last me a lifetime.  Beautiful state with tons to do....but scary place to live.....and expensive.  Our house sold for $813/sq foot in 2007.  We moved to Texas and built a new house in a very nice neighborhood for $186/sq ft.  

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13 hours ago, Red said:

Before anyone up and moves to CA for their golden years in the golden state,

 

I really don't think that's a problem

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On 7/18/2020 at 4:18 AM, Rougarou said:

 

I really don't think that's a problem

Good news for this long time (Century's) family native Californian. :thumbsup:

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