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Are Custom Ear Plugs Worth It?


Firenailer

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Firenailer

My Audiologist recommended having custom plugs fitted and made to protect my hearing, and hopefully alleviate some of the tinnitus I experience.

Has anyone gone this route, and are they really a big improvement over the foam plugs?

 

Thanks,

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Depends on what you mean by improvement. In terms of noise reduction properly inserted foam plugs are about as good as you can get, although the emphasis on properly inserted is important as most users don't get it right. Custom plugs often go in easier and are more comfortable so they may be worth it to you though, pretty subjective.

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I wore custom made earplugs through my last all expense paid trip to Iraq. My tinnitus did not get worse (as it had on all previous trips to loud places). This is most probably due to wearing them more due to the comfort factor.

 

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Mrs. Caddis

I had plugs made by an audiologist, though more comfortable for me than the various foam plugs I had tried, they didn't work well with the speakers on our blue tooth system. I had Arizona Al make new ones for me that bypass the speakers and I love them. I agree with smiller that properly inserted foam plugs will do the job just fine. My husband Caddis like the foam better and got an assortment pack like one of these to find the best fit and noise reduction combination.

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A qualified "yes" they are worth it. I think I would have been content to stay with off the shelf plugs if they would stay put, but regardless of what kind I would try, they would work themselves loose during a ride. Perhaps my shallow/weird ears are a reason. So I have two sets of custom plugs... one with speakers embedded in them (for the GPS, MP3's, etc.), and one without. Major improvement for staying in the ear and protecting my hearing.

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Foam plugs irritate my ears after a few hours, whereas custom made plugs are all-day (20+ hours) comfortable.

I frequently had problems getting the foam plugs in correctly, so they didn't provide the noise reduction I was looking for (especially on the RS), but on the rare occasion when they were in correctly they were better than custom fit plugs. They just weren't comfortable over the long haul. Plus the custom fit plugs last a very long time.

 

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Antimatter

My experience was the opposite - I have a set of custom ear plugs that I had made some time ago. The problem with them is that when I'm putting on my helmet it bends my ears enough that the custom plugs cause a sharp pain in my ear canal. So, I save the custom plugs for shooting and running the lawn mower.

 

For riding, I purchased a large assortment of different ear plugs from an online vendor. The assortment included two sets of plugs of each type and brand, so my wife and I took our time trying each one out until we compromised on a particular brand and type. We then went out and purchased that in bulk, and I carry a few sets of those with me.

 

A big part of the problem with foam ear plugs is folks don't insert them correctly, IMHO. I always get a bunch of funny looks when I'm reaching over my head to pull my opposing ear back.

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My experience has been that custom-made plugs are, without a doubt, better than foam plugs. By better I mean that custom plugs are: effective; easier to insert and get the right fit every time (and thus work better); and, more comfortable over the long haul. I found that foam plugs lost their "elasticity" over the course of a long day of taking them out and re-inserting them several times and became less effective as the day wore on. Even if that weren't the case, I've found custom-made plugs to be much more convenient. I, too, have several sets made by Arizona Al (both regular plugs and ear buds that I use when I want audio, such as from my Sena Bluetooth intercom.

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As Eileen (Mrs Caddis) said, I got a variety pack of foam plugs so that I could try out different ones. I found a lot a variation in comfort, as well as noise protection. I have had tinnitus since I was in my twenties (not a result of riding) and I use foam plugs every time I am on the bike. I think they do a fine job, although I haven't tried custom made plugs so I can't really say if that would be even better.

 

Are you using foam plugs now, and the audiologist thinks you should change to a custom earplug? Or are you not using anything now?

 

If you haven't tried out several different types of foam plugs, that might be a good thing to start with. Then if you don't find any that work well enough, you could go the more expensive route of getting some custom plugs made by an audiologist. Or better yet, get Arizona Al to make you some - Eileen says they work better than the ones she got from the audiologist, and a lot less expensive.

 

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RockBottom

I had custom ones made and disliked them greatly. Too big to fit under my helmet. After trying probably 20 different types, I found that Moldex Pura-Fits are perfect for me with my two radically different sized ear canals. I buy a case from Amazon and it lasts a couple of years.

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moshe_levy

This is a really great thread.

 

I used highly rated foam earplugs for many years, and like others posted, never really found them comfortable. The worst aspect is installation, which if not performed perfectly, always seems to actually magnify the noise. And of course by then you've already taken off, so now you either put up with it or pull over and go through the acrobatics again.

 

A few years ago, I had a set of custom molded plugs made for me at the NYC Motorcycle Show where there is always an audiologist on the scene. They were OK. Certainly more comfy than foam, but...

 

By chance I happened to try a set of E-A-R premolded plugs lying around the shop at work, and man... PERFECT.

 

image-310.php?id=70071521143

 

E-A-R

 

They block out better than anything I've ever tried, they are ALL day comfortable (22+ hours, never sore), are not expensive, and are readily available. Go to that EAR site - they have over 120 choices! I also find the plugs used on the Etymotic speaker earplugs very comfy too. So I guess my ears prefer premolded plastic best of all...

 

-MKL

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I've worn various plugs for over 40 years, and tried some custom molded plugs as well. Some fit some don't some are comfortable, some are not. The foam plugs are usually the most comfortable, but the biggest hassle to properly place. I finally found the Peltor, tri-flange plugs, that are on a tether, they are like the EAR plugs above. These seem to be the best all around plug for me. Easy and fast to put in, do a good job too.

 

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41E01KQBWGL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

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+1 on the "Great thread".

 

I've used lot's of disposables, and one pair of molded (from a national hearing aid manufacturer).

 

Had some problems with the molded plugs shifting in position while donning my helmet. (Who cares when taking it off?). Also, on bikes with windshields, the molded suffered from low frequency "thrumming". (Kind of like being on a jet aircraft, sitting between the engines). I think because they sealed the ear canal too well, they responded to the low frequency part of the turbulence. So the molded could be really good, or really bad. Also had problems with discomfort after several hours due to the helmet compressing the outer ear, creating pressure points. Off the bike, they're quick to put in and pretty comfortable. I've worn them on airplanes and car trips.

 

Foam plugs vary a lot. I've worn several types and am amazed at the differences in ease of placement, noise reduction and comfort. Even after finding the "best ever", I tried a different pair recently that were more comfortable and quieter yet. However, they too seem to be more prone to thrumming (but not as bad as the molded).

 

Some foam plugs come with semi-rigid stems to aid in insertion and removal. I had mixed success with them. Definitely easier and quicker to put in (after modifying my technique) but found that my helmet could dislodge them by tweaking the stem while putting on the lid.

 

Also agree that most of the time when I see other people with foam plugs in, they're not in correctly. I put them in wrong for years. My brother, and aircraft mechanic who had frequent on-the-job hearing protection training, finally taught me how. If I would have bothered reading the packaging, it would taught me sooner. When riding with a group (which I don't do all that often), I have to get a head start on getting ready, and am usually the last one ready to go because I'm still messing with my ear plugs. It can take (or try) a lot of patience to get it right--it does get better with practice, but some days...

 

As others described, my ears are not the same. Left ear is a breeze; almost always perfect on the first try. Right ear, as we say in the Great White North, Uff Da! If it's not right after two tries (taking minutes per), then it's time to try the 'back-up' pair. Once I get them in correctly, I really hate taking them back out.

 

I would like to try the "musician's" type of molded plugs, with the "air brake" passage. I wonder if that would get rid of the low frequency problem. I'd also like to try the 'Arizona Al' type. (Maybe I'll get a chance at Torrey!)

 

www.webbikeworld.com has a lot of good information on the subject.

 

Foam plugs are cheap and very effective, don't be afraid to try lots of different types. Most of the time, the quietest ride I can get is with foam plugs, stock RT shield all the way up, and full-face helmet visor all the way open (or almost all the way open). Helmets vary too, but that's a different thread!

 

I've had tinnitus for about 15 years. While I don't think the ear plugs make any real difference on the tinnitus (doesn't make it better), I'm guessing that it does keep it from getting worse.

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Joe Frickin' Friday

Been using Howard Leight Max NRR33 disposable plugs for most of my riding career.

 

Last year I tried custom-molded plugs. At the same time, I had the foam pads in my helmet tweaked to make room so that they would not touch the custom plugs. The custom plugs were still considerably noisier than the disposables.

 

I'm pretty sure the HL Max NRR 33's are just about the best hearing protection you can get. The audio quality of my helmet-mounted Autocomm speakers isn't great compared to what you cn get with speakers installed in custom-molded plugs - but jeez, I'm not out there for the music, I'm out there to ride.

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Guest Kakugo

Middle of the road alternative: try silicone or bee wax plugs. They are more expensive than ordinary foam type but much cheaper than custom made ones so if you don't like them it's not big loss. My ear canals are very oddly shaped so fitting foam plugs is nigh on impossible but I am very satisfied with silicone plugs.

Ohropax (German brand) make the best in both bee wax and silicone: they also seem to last longer than the competition (Mack's etc).

When they get too dirty or don't stick anymore just discard them and use a new pair.

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Peter Parts

Great thread to read but only proves no one size fits all. My 2-cents:

 

1. that guy at the motorcycle show likely is not a skilled audiology tech and you have no solid way to find out... that is important to remember.

 

2. believe it or not, ears grow or change, if not adjacent organs

 

3. for me, best advantage of custom plugs is that they are not the best at noise reduction but they reduce about the right amount for me.

 

4. I have contemplated the research on hearing damage from bikes for a very long time and am something of a skeptic; better safe than sorry, provided you are not using your hearing for good and safe biking. There is one simple test and I have never seen it published: do older bikers have more hearing loss than a matched sample.

 

Ben

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My Audiologist recommended having custom plugs fitted and made to protect my hearing, and hopefully alleviate some of the tinnitus I experience.

Has anyone gone this route, and are they really a big improvement over the foam plugs?

 

Thanks,

 

Like saddles, ear canals/head shape/ ear protrusion vary by individual.

Our experience has been positive.

Unfortunately no way to find out but do it.

Beth loves her pair from Arizona Al, a boardmember.

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Jack Herbst

I have had Big Ear custom molded ear/headphones for four years. They were $300. I have been diappointed with service (none). They DO NOT block out road noise as well as foam ear plugs. I have a lot of static out of one side wich Big Ear would fix for almost the cost of a new pair. I think they suck.

 

The best way to go is a helmut headset with foam earplugs. This blocks out all road/wind noise and lets you hear your headset clearly. If you do not have a radio installed you will have to have (J&M) amp to power the helmet headset. Only advantage the Big Ear has over this is you can plug directly into your 550/650 GPS.

 

Jack

 

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I wanted my custom ear plugs to work, but because my ear canals are narrow with a tight turn, they didn't seal well, so I sent them back.

 

YMMV--we're individuals, you know.

 

I'm happy enough with foam plugs, which insert and seal much better if you wet your ear canals first.

 

I carry a small squeeze bottle in my tankbag that contains a mixture of isopropyl alcohol and distilled water, and dribble the mixture in my ears before inserting the plugs. I've seen airport workers do the same.

 

Also, as far as all-day comfort goes, one has to experiment with the various brands and shapes. I've worn some that bugged me after two hours, and some that were amazingly good for Iron Butt rides.

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Sailorlite

My locally custom molded earplugs were great until I started wearing a new Shoei Neotec helmet - now I'm experiencing some ear pain because the plugs don't happen to fit well within this helmet.

 

I'm optimistic that a thinner cheek pad set will correct the earplug issue and make the helmet itself more comfortable.

 

Riders who find the custom earplugs uncomfortable might check to see whether their helmets' padding is causing the discomfort - maybe the padding thickness can be reduced in the ear area.

 

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I rode yesterday with my er6i headphone as my earplugs/sometimes music source. They were great even at 90+ with a head wind, and I was riding my naked Ducati.

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I rode yesterday with my er6i headphone as my earplugs/sometimes music source. They were great even at 90+ with a head wind, and I was riding my naked Ducati.

The Etymotic ER6i are the hot ticket IMO. A NRR (noise reduction rating) as good as many dedicated earplugs plus high-quality tunes when you're in the mood. Some find them comfortable long-term and some don't, but for anyone in the first group they're a great option.

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Love my custom molded earplugs with built in ear buds. Not necessarily quieter or more comfortable than foam, but quite effective.

 

Told the audiologist I wanted them to fit under a helmet and have had no problems with them shifting when putting the helmet on.

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I use a set of Shure earphones with a rubber end (they send options). You squeeze the rubber like you would a foam plug and it expands to fill, but does not irritate like foam.

Shure Earphones

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In my line of work ear protection is a must and I have used the foam plugs for years with varied performance depending on the ones the companies have supplied. The last Torrey I attended I had AzAl make a set of customs for me and have found them to perform as well as the best of the foam ones ever did. Needing to carry some form of lubrication for them is a minor inconvenience, which in my opinion is well worth it considering that they don't get caked with any grime from ones hands when being reinserted after taking them out to have a conversation, they don't get water logged when riding in hot weather, and they are super comfortable.

YMMV of course, but I feel they have been one of my better investments in riding gear.

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I use both custom earplugs and foam disposables that I buy in bulk at Walmart. I like both. The foam plugs get duty on commutes to work and short rides, while the custom plugs, which have built in speakers, are worn on longer day rides. Az Al made my custom plugs 10 years ago. I've had to replace the speakers several times in thet period, but the plugs are still in good shape and do their job. YMMV

 

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Firenailer

Wow! Thanks for all of the replies, I guess what works for one person really might not be best for another. I've never tried pulling up on the ear as I insert the plug. I'll have to give that a try before going with the customs.

 

Thanks everyone.

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Just to add my $0.02, I have both custom stereo ear plugs and the classic, orange foam thingies....i use the custom ones when I want to listen to music or my Zumo for GPS, but the simple, orange foam ones work fine, and over long periods are MORE comfortable.. YMMV, but the custom wires occasionally get in the way, and then if the wires are accidentally pulled, the earplug can be moved and then will cause discomfort. If you're going with the non-music capable ones, then there is no wire to be worried about. All in all, since I got the Schurberth helmet, the foam plugs are more than adequate for almost all my rides....the important thing is to wear some ear protection.

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I happen to have tinnitus. I also shoot skeet regularly and ride motorcycles. I have tried many different types of ear protection devices from in the ear to muffs. What I have found is that the foam plugs do work as well as most others, but as an earlier poster mentioned, you must put them in correctly and get a good seal. With that said, custom molded plugs that I have gotten made at local gun shows seem to work almost as well and being custom fitted to your ear, fit better and are more comfortable over the long run. You can also purchase them in a "kit" form from sports vendors such as Cabellas and mold them yourself. Either way, they are not too expensive at about $40 max.

 

Just as a note: If you have tinnitus you will never be rid of it, nor will ear protection "relieve" the symptoms. What plugs will do is help prevent the condition from worsening. Having grown up in the 1960's shooting guns and racing 2-stroke bikes with no silencers with nothing protecting my ears, the damage on me is done. I'm just trying to save what remains.

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I like the Big Ear solids and will buy the audio version soon. They fit, they block out enough of the wind noise to make riding more fun. I can hear conversation and other cars easily, but at a lower volume. The foam plugs just don't work on my odd ear canals.

 

I went directly to Big Ear with ear molds made locally by an audiologist and had no problems. I find they are comfortable even on long all day rides. Be careful not to tug on the cord getting into your helmet or they can work loose and cause a stop to re-adjust them.

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Firenailer

 

Hey Wayne,

 

That's pretty much where I am, I just don't want it to get worse if I can help it. Too many years of guns, tools, sirens and motorcycles have really taken a toll on my hearing.

 

I picked up a new Arai Signet after being fitted at a show and the wind noise seems to be worse for some reason. My 10 year old Arai was very quiet, just very worn out! Oh well, I'm going to try the custom molded plugs and see if they help.

 

Thanks again for all of the replies,

 

Bob

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I've had great experience with custom plugs/speakers. These are molded to your ear, allow you to set volume for music or related communications. They don't work with wireless apps.

 

I too have tinnitus and can wear these plugs all day. They significant lower external noise and allow you to listen to anything you want at an appropriate volume. Best of both worlds.

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Wow! Thanks for all of the replies, I guess what works for one person really might not be best for another. I've never tried pulling up on the ear as I insert the plug. I'll have to give that a try before going with the customs.

 

Thanks everyone.

 

Definitly pull up on the ear when inserting foam plugs. It makes a big difference on how they enter the ear canal. If they aren't in the canal, then they aren't doing their job.

 

If you want to try custom plugs without breaking the bank, check out Earfuze

 

For under $50, you can make your own in about 30 minutes. I used disposable foam plugs for years and never had an issue other than I kept blowing out my intercom speakers because I had to crank the hell out of them so I could hear the sound through the plugs. I decided to give the custom earbuds a shot last year when I bought a new Sena SMH-10 bluetooth intercom. I have been thrilled with the results. Not only do I use the new molded plugs when riding, but I now also use them at work, when traveling, mowing the grass.....etc. For me, they have are all day comfortable and I have zero complaints. I bought the motorsports set with Red/Blue plugs and the included "practice" kit. That left me with a great set of headphone plugs and a single solid plug from the practice kit. I plan to buy a second kit for another pair of headphones and will mold the new practice plug to my other ear. That will leave me 2 audio headsets and a complete set of custom solids for under $100.

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Bill_Walker

As you're finding out, different people have different ear canal shapes, so what works for others may not work for you. For example, Eddd loves the ER6i ear speakers. I found them very uncomfortable after half an hour. I gave them to Whip, and he loved them.

 

I have a set of Arizona Al custom-molded ear speakers, made several years ago, and they're great, for me. When I don't want audio, I use the Howard Leight "Quiet" plugs. You don't have to roll them to make them skinny like the foam plugs, so they're less of a hassle to use. I've also used the Howard Leight "Max" foam plugs, and I actually find them too quiet. I can't hear anything with those things in my ears!

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Foam plugs irritate my ears after a few hours, whereas custom made plugs are all-day (20+ hours) comfortable.

I frequently had problems getting the foam plugs in correctly, so they didn't provide the noise reduction I was looking for (especially on the RS), but on the rare occasion when they were in correctly they were better than custom fit plugs. They just weren't comfortable over the long haul. Plus the custom fit plugs last a very long time.

I find the yellow foam plugs that are shaped like small cans irritate my ears since the material is rough and hard. I switched over to Howard Leight Max Lite earplugs and no longer have a problem with ear irritation. I have sleep apnea (and use a CPAP machine) so I sleep with earplugs every night with no problems.

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Foam plugs irritate my ears after a few hours, whereas custom made plugs are all-day (20+ hours) comfortable.

I frequently had problems getting the foam plugs in correctly, so they didn't provide the noise reduction I was looking for (especially on the RS), but on the rare occasion when they were in correctly they were better than custom fit plugs. They just weren't comfortable over the long haul. Plus the custom fit plugs last a very long time.

I find the yellow foam plugs that are shaped like small cans irritate my ears since the material is rough and hard. I switched over to Howard Leight Max Lite earplugs and no longer have a problem with ear irritation. I have sleep apnea (and use a CPAP machine) so I sleep with earplugs every night with no problems.

 

+1 .... Max Lites are the only ones that don't hurt my ears.

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Peter Parts

Someone above mentioned carrying a little squeeze bottle of dilute alcohol (I think) to lubricate the rubber custom plugs (I think).

 

I'd like to hear more ideas about techniques to make them work easier or better (or to avoid), please.

 

Ben

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I always use Oto-Ease lubricant when inserting my ArizonaAl plugs. Oto-Ease is made for use with hearing aids etc. To quote the advertising material, "Bacteria-free, greaseless lubricant helps ease the insertion of earpieces, hearing instruments and other custom-fit products into the ear and provides an effective acoustic seal."

 

http://www.westone.com/catalog/oto-ease-earmold-lubricant

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Someone above mentioned carrying a little squeeze bottle of dilute alcohol (I think) to lubricate the rubber custom plugs (I think).

 

I'd like to hear more ideas about techniques to make them work easier or better (or to avoid), please.

 

Ben

 

Just a bit of saliva works perfect! The nice thing about the foam plugs is they are so cheap you can use a new pair every ride!

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Someone above mentioned carrying a little squeeze bottle of dilute alcohol (I think) to lubricate the rubber custom plugs (I think).

 

I'd like to hear more ideas about techniques to make them work easier or better (or to avoid), please.

 

Ben

I carry an extra tube of chapstick for this.

Makes inserting them easier, I don't get any pain from my earbuds, and best of all, the insides of my ears never get chapped! ;)

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Peter Parts

Did a bit of experimenting including KY kind of stuff. My impression is that almost any liquid helps inserting the ear plugs (which have a lot of friction in the absence of liquid).

 

But that leaves the question of what liquids you really want in your ear in terms of health and residue? So maybe plain water or water plus some alcohol (which is good if you are carrying the water around in a little bottle).

 

There is one commercial substance which might be of interest to bikers and that is "artificial tears" which is a real good thing to carry for older tourers. It is a kind of lubricant and is sterile and comes in little bottles. It contains stuff like liquid PVC and car anti-freeze.

 

I'd suppose the ear plugs need cleaning once in a while.

 

Ben

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Did a bit of experimenting including KY kind of stuff. My impression is that almost any liquid helps inserting the ear plugs (which have a lot of friction in the absence of liquid).

 

But that leaves the question of what liquids you really want in your ear in terms of health and residue? So maybe plain water or water plus some alcohol (which is good if you are carrying the water around in a little bottle).

 

There is one commercial substance which might be of interest to bikers and that is "artificial tears" which is a real good thing to carry for older tourers. It is a kind of lubricant and is sterile and comes in little bottles. It contains stuff like liquid PVC and car anti-freeze.

 

I'd suppose the ear plugs need cleaning once in a while.

 

Ben

 

Why not the Oto-Ease that I mentioned in an earlier post? It is designed precisely for this purpose (ear plugs, hearing aids etc.) and comes in small bottles that last a very long time.

 

http://www.westone.com/catalog/oto-ease-earmold-lubricant

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Peter Parts
Did a bit of experimenting including KY kind of stuff. My impression is that almost any liquid helps inserting the ear plugs (which have a lot of friction in the absence of liquid).

 

But that leaves the question of what liquids you really want in your ear in terms of health and residue? So maybe plain water or water plus some alcohol (which is good if you are carrying the water around in a little bottle).

 

There is one commercial substance which might be of interest to bikers and that is "artificial tears" which is a real good thing to carry for older tourers. It is a kind of lubricant and is sterile and comes in little bottles. It contains stuff like liquid PVC and car anti-freeze.

 

I'd suppose the ear plugs need cleaning once in a while.

 

Ben

 

Why not the Oto-Ease that I mentioned in an earlier post? It is designed precisely for this purpose (ear plugs, hearing aids etc.) and comes in small bottles that last a very long time.

 

http://www.westone.com/catalog/oto-ease-earmold-lubricant

 

Thank you for mentioning that product. I had a look. But two things "red flagged" it for me.

 

1. They used to have a trace of mercury in that product. Although no longer, would you trust such a company?

 

2. I couldn't find a single word anywhere about the contents of the product. Not nice. Likely the usual mix of car anti-freeze (ethylene glycol) and glycerin).

 

Of course, it is designed for application(s) similar to our own, if not exactly uniquely for it. And likely has preservatives in the mix (which is needed for long-term storage). Of course, better to mix your own fresh batch and use no preservatives... but then you need to be careful about bad stuff growing in the bottle.

 

My further guess is that it is kind of pricey for the purpose, like a lot of stuff at optical stores and audiologists. I suspect "artificial tear drops" are similar and might already be in your travel kit.

 

Yes, I think it likely is a good product and grateful you posted it.

 

Best route prolly mix your own from glycerin (which makes a great hand lotion).

 

Ben

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Did a bit of experimenting including KY kind of stuff. My impression is that almost any liquid helps inserting the ear plugs (which have a lot of friction in the absence of liquid).

 

But that leaves the question of what liquids you really want in your ear in terms of health and residue? So maybe plain water or water plus some alcohol (which is good if you are carrying the water around in a little bottle).

 

There is one commercial substance which might be of interest to bikers and that is "artificial tears" which is a real good thing to carry for older tourers. It is a kind of lubricant and is sterile and comes in little bottles. It contains stuff like liquid PVC and car anti-freeze.

 

I'd suppose the ear plugs need cleaning once in a while.

 

Ben

 

Why not the Oto-Ease that I mentioned in an earlier post? It is designed precisely for this purpose (ear plugs, hearing aids etc.) and comes in small bottles that last a very long time.

 

http://www.westone.com/catalog/oto-ease-earmold-lubricant

 

Thank you for mentioning that product. I had a look. But two things "red flagged" it for me.

 

1. They used to have a trace of mercury in that product. Although no longer, would you trust such a company?

 

2. I couldn't find a single word anywhere about the contents of the product. Not nice. Likely the usual mix of car anti-freeze (ethylene glycol) and glycerin).

 

Of course, it is designed for application(s) similar to our own, if not exactly uniquely for it. And likely has preservatives in the mix (which is needed for long-term storage). Of course, better to mix your own fresh batch and use no preservatives... but then you need to be careful about bad stuff growing in the bottle.

 

My further guess is that it is kind of pricey for the purpose, like a lot of stuff at optical stores and audiologists. I suspect "artificial tear drops" are similar and might already be in your travel kit.

 

Yes, I think it likely is a good product and grateful you posted it.

 

Best route prolly mix your own from glycerin (which makes a great hand lotion).

 

Ben

 

Ben, you obviously are prepared to go to hell of a lot more trouble than I am to solve a simple problem. I like it; no, I'm not concerned about the company and what's in it (especially at my age); and no, it is not expensive. Hell, we ride BMWs. :grin:

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