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Rain gear recommendations


Rex R

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Hey guys,

 

I'm sure that this topic has been covered before, but let's rehash and refresh.

 

What rain gear do you use? Like? Didn't work for you?

 

 

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i've survived with Frogg Toggs. Good price point, fine to wear off the bike at sporting events, etc. nothing's perfect but for the price, the size choices, etc they work fine. keep them rolled up in side case.

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i've survived with Frogg Toggs. Good price point, fine to wear off the bike at sporting events, etc. nothing's perfect but for the price, the size choices, etc they work fine. keep them rolled up in side case.

+1 on the Frogg Toggs

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i've survived with Frogg Toggs. Good price point, fine to wear off the bike at sporting events, etc. nothing's perfect but for the price, the size choices, etc they work fine. keep them rolled up in side case.

 

+1 on all points. I don't think they are great, but they have worked for me over the years. Always looking for a better solution, but haven't found anything better for the price.

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I currently have First Gear rain suit. So far it has lasted 14 years.

 

Before that I had a Fieldsheer (one piece) that lasted 12 years - crotch leak.

 

Before that I had a Dry Rider that lasted about 6 years - seams began to leak.

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First Gear stuff is great, but the Frogg Toggs, for the price are the better deal. My son in law is traveling with me next month and I recommended the Toggs.

 

 

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You get what you pay for.

No substitute for real GoreTex. My jacket is 20 yrs old now and good for more yet.

Cabelas has the best choices...

 

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I love my Frogg Togs. They aren't fashionable, but they work, and breathe, so I don't feel clammy while wearing them. Plus, the jacket makes a serviceable windbreaker when on foot. Light, cheap, effective, and they pack down pretty small.

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I'll be the dissenting voice.

 

In my personal experience, Frogg Toggs work about as well as jumping in a pool. They did NOT keep me dry at all, soaked in 10 seconds flat, and were just useless and a waste of $50.

 

My personal choice is a one piece Aerostich Roadcrafter. Yes, it's in the top 3 most expensive suits you can get, but there's a reason for it. My suit is going on 7 years old, over 90,000 miles, and to this day I can ride through a downpour frog strangler for 8 hours, step out of my suit, be dry as a bone and go have dinner.

 

The Aerostich isn't for everyone, but it definitely gets my vote.

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Thanks to all for your opinions and suggestions.

 

Anyone care to recommend or comment on options for overgloves or over-booties?

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I own a pair of these. Their inexpensive, easy to pack, easy to put on quickly, and work very well. They leave the soles of your boots open, so you're not grinding them into the pavement when your walking around. As far as gloves. I have an old, generic pair of rubber rain gloves that work fine. Can't remember where I got them.

 

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/1/1/41/520/ITEM/Tour-Master-Deluxe-Boot-Rain-Covers.aspx

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First Gear stuff is great, but the Frogg Toggs, for the price are the better deal. My son in law is traveling with me next month and I recommended the Toggs.

 

 

Depends.

(No not those :grin: )

 

I've used a couple set of Frogg Toggs and sold dozens of them.

They work well, lightweight.

But, on my bike airflow tended to hit the lower forearm and over the miles they wore out there.

Strange, I know, but true.

 

I use Tour Master jackets now, w/built in hood to help with rain drip down neck.

Pants are Stearns w/mesh liner and they are long enough to keep below the boot tops when it rains, standard pant/bibs aren't (for me).

Beth uses First Gear w/great hood and stays completely dry.

I think the addition of hoods to rain gear is a great help.

Rain gear does several things.

Hopefully keeps you dry, can also keep you warmer in cold weather.

It should add conspicuity, something Frogg Toggs lack, IMO.

Frogg Toggs are better in high humidity.

 

Also, dedicated rain gear keeps your waterproof riding gear dry.

A contradiction?

No, even waterproof gear gets soaked, can leak, takes hours to dry and isn't fun to put on wet in the morning, IMO.

 

Remember the garbage back trick, carry one and use it to cover your boots so you can slide the rain pants on easily on the side of the road.

 

Over booties?

No.

Get waterproof boots like SIDI's.

Overgloves.

Aerostitch Triple Digits.

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malcolmblalock

Roadcrafter and three-digit gloves from Aerostich do it for me. Stay dry and warm. Expensive for the Roadcrafter, but they hold up for many years. Gloves (actually overgloves) keep hands dry.

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Thanks to all for your opinions and suggestions.

 

Anyone care to recommend or comment on options for overgloves or over-booties?

Aerostich triple digits, over unlined gloves, over a base layer of thin polypro or wool glove liners (carry 2 pairs).

screenshot-20120426-102053.png

 

The triple digits are utterly waterproof, but water can run down your sleeve past the gauntlet, even if you snug up the cuff by pulling on the stretchy cord. If the glove liners get wet, change to dry ones at a rest stop. They can be dried quickly with a hot air hand dryer in a restroom. Unlined gloves dry faster than lined ones.

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The triple digits are utterly waterproof, but water can run down your sleeve past the gauntlet, even if you snug up the cuff by pulling on the stretchy cord.

 

It's always struck me as odd that waterproof motorcycle gloves have gauntlets. They need to be tucked *inside* the jacket cuff if they're going to keep water from running in. It's like flashing a roof, upper layer goes over the lower layer.

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I've used the triple digits for a number of years and have never had a problem with water running down and under the gauntlet, regardless how heavily, or for how long, it was raining.

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It IS nice when the gear you're already wearing is waterproof. To that end, my winter gear (12 year old Firstgear Kilimanjaro and matching HT overpants) have yet to leak a single drop. I've ridden all day long in downpours with no rain gear.

 

The spring, summer, and fall are another matter, because generally you're wearing mesh. Rain gear is a must. Unlike my winter gear, my 3 season gear is premium stuff. BMW Airshell jacket and Motoport Kevlar Mesh overpants. Both have liners that are 100% waterproof, but the outer fabric of course soaks through in seconds, even though the inner liner is dry. It feels STRANGE to have this sopping wet (waterlogged) garment on the outside but stay dry inside.

 

So you do need rain gear. My original rain gear was a PVC Teknic set that packed HUGE. On my 2007 x-country trip with the wife, we were in the Chicago area when we just got plain sick of how much room that gear took up. So we walked into Chicago BMW to look for rain gear - they had nothing.

 

So we crossed the street into Chicago Harley, and they of course had loads of "genuine gear" to pick from. We got matching gear that folds up into a tiny purse. It's never let me down, though I do get odd stares riding around on an RT with a huge orange and black rainsuit on. Naturally, it has an enormous Bar & Shield on the back. Reflective, of course. For good measure. But hey, I'm dry!

 

I guess the lesson is, the gear needs to work, yes, but also needs to be small enough that you actually carry it around, so you actually have it when you actually need it.

 

-MKL

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It IS nice when the gear you're already wearing is waterproof. To that end, my winter gear (12 year old Firstgear Kilimanjaro and matching HT overpants) have yet to leak a single drop. I've ridden all day long in downpours with no rain gear.

 

The spring, summer, and fall are another matter, because generally you're wearing mesh. Rain gear is a must. Unlike my winter gear, my 3 season gear is premium stuff. BMW Airshell jacket and Motoport Kevlar Mesh overpants. Both have liners that are 100% waterproof, but the outer fabric of course soaks through in seconds, even though the inner liner is dry. It feels STRANGE to have this sopping wet (waterlogged) garment on the outside but stay dry inside.

 

So you do need rain gear. My original rain gear was a PVC Teknic set that packed HUGE. On my 2007 x-country trip with the wife, we were in the Chicago area when we just got plain sick of how much room that gear took up. So we walked into Chicago BMW to look for rain gear - they had nothing.

 

So we crossed the street into Chicago Harley, and they of course had loads of "genuine gear" to pick from. We got matching gear that folds up into a tiny purse. It's never let me down, though I do get odd stares riding around on an RT with a huge orange and black rainsuit on. Naturally, it has an enormous Bar & Shield on the back. Reflective, of course. For good measure. But hey, I'm dry!

 

I guess the lesson is, the gear needs to work, yes, but also needs to be small enough that you actually carry it around, so you actually have it when you actually need it.

 

-MKL

 

Agreed on every point there, and packing size is why I have been on the hunt for a replacement for my Frogg Toggs. My winter setup is also waterproof First Gear stuff (Kathmandu and HT overpants) that has never let me down. My 3 season stuff is a BMW Savannah II jacket and either Airflow II pants or Summer II pants. I don't mind throwing the gortex liner in the jacket when i know I'm going to hit a quick thunderstorm, but having a soaked jacket all day is not a good idea unless it is the dead of summer. Try that in late spring or early fall and you will end up with hypothermia. So when commuting I carry my Frogg Togg pants, and when traveling I carry the whole suit. The #1 the irritates me is the fact that when they are packed, they take up more room than my tent and sleeping bag combined. Guess maybe I should should swing by ye old Harley shop and see what I can see.

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Well, BMW's or Firstgear's rain gear packs up tiny, like the Harley gear. It's more nylon than PVC, which packs huge. The issue for me was simply availability - I needed something right then, and thre my PVC gear away on the spot. If you're not in a rush you can hit your nearest dealer, try stuff on, and order if you have to. I like the way BMW's gear LOOKS but I have no experience with it (although for the most part, every piece of BMW gear I've owned or tried is excellent.) My friend Matt has the FG raingear and it works well, and packs small.

 

-MKL

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You have a GS with panniers and need more room to pack?

:rofl:

:wave:

Hey, we often need to pack for 2 and have plenty of room.

Sometimes rain gear goes in GIVI, in a garbage bag, so that when it comes off it can be packed w/out getting other stuff wet.

Sometimes I pack it in a Helen 2 Wheels mesh bag that is carried on the luggage rack of the GIVI, ez to get to and will dry when you put it back there, away from other gear.

 

 

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I suppose the dealership thing is part of the problem as well. I usually wear tall sizes and most off the rack stuff doesn't fit well. The First Gear XLT and BMW gear being the exception. My local BMW shop doesn't carry any BMW gear or really any gear for that matter. You usually have your choice of about 5 leather jackets, 3 textiles, and 6 pairs of boots......all in sizes that no one buys.

 

The two local big Japanese bike shops sell gear but seem to cater more to the dirtbike and crotch rocket crowd. I don't remember the last time I visited one of our local Harley shops. I think it was back when Buell went under and I wanted to see what deals were around. I need to do something before I head West for the UNrally this summer, so I have some time to shop around.

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You have a GS with panniers and need more room to pack?

:rofl:

:wave:

Hey, we often need to pack for 2 and have plenty of room.

Sometimes rain gear goes in GIVI, in a garbage bag, so that when it comes off it can be packed w/out getting other stuff wet.

Sometimes I pack it in a Helen 2 Wheels mesh bag that is carried on the luggage rack of the GIVI, ez to get to and will dry when you put it back there, away from other gear.

 

 

I didn't say that......I just said that its rediculous that my rain gear takes up more room than my camping equipment. When we travel 2-up, the camping gear stays home anyway. Danielle says she likes to camp, but I have found that we have different definitions of the word "camping". When traveling solo for a week, I usually don't even fill up a whole pannier. The only time I use the bags is when I'm traveling. The rest of the time I just have the top case on......which already holds oil, tire repair kit, air pump, tools, extra visor, 2-3 pairs of gloves, and spray cleaner. If I added my Frogg Toggs to the mix I wouldn't be able to pack my lunch. You wouldn't like me when I miss lunch

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I've been through so many different variations of rain gear I feel I should be a paid tester.

 

I wanted to reduce the amount of gear I was carrying, try to select items that weren't restricting, and be able to quickly don my gear on the side of the road without removing anything.

 

My current setup, and best so far, is my Olymipia AST jacket coupled with Firstgear Rainman pants, Triple Digit overgloves, and waterproof boots. With this setup, I'm already wearing 1/2 of my raingear all the time (jacket and boots). The Triple Digits take up almost no room and are a snap to put on. The Rainman pants were selected because I can get them on over my boots while on the side of the road. They pack small, and even have a built-in storage pouch, though I don't use it.

 

A great trick I picked up somewhere along the way is to carry a couple of plastic grocery bags along with your over pants. If you slip the bags over your boots before you try to put on the over pants, your boots will slip right through the legs, avoiding the occasional problem of having the sole or heel catch on the inside of the pant leg.

 

One of the things I disliked about separate rain jackets, was the restricted feeling when you had on an additional layer. The rainy conditions already are interfering with your ability to see what is going on around you.

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It IS nice when the gear you're already wearing is waterproof. To that end, my winter gear (12 year old Firstgear Kilimanjaro and matching HT overpants) have yet to leak a single drop. I've ridden all day long in downpours with no rain gear.

 

 

-MKL

 

Hopefully this is not hijacking this discussion, but I also have a 11 or 12 year old Kilimanjaro. However it is no longer waterproof. The material gets saturated and passes through. Do you periodically apply something to keep it waterproof?

 

Rich

 

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It IS nice when the gear you're already wearing is waterproof. To that end, my winter gear (12 year old Firstgear Kilimanjaro and matching HT overpants) have yet to leak a single drop. I've ridden all day long in downpours with no rain gear.

 

 

-MKL

 

Hopefully this is not hijacking this discussion, but I also have a 11 or 12 year old Kilimanjaro. However it is no longer waterproof. The material gets saturated and passes through. Do you periodically apply something to keep it waterproof?

 

Rich

 

Nikwax

 

You can get it as a spray on application or a wash in application. Works great. I had an old First Gear Kenya jacket (waist length Kilimanjaro) that kind of lost its waterproofness over the years. It would soak through the forearms after extended rain. I bought the spray on Nikwax and treated it once a year. It lasted a few more years until I decided I wanted a new jacket. That jacket was recently given to a co-worker who just bought his first bike and it is back in use again.

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Thanks Keith! My jacket could use a washing too, so I think I'll get the Nikwax Tech Wash and TX Direct Wash Twin Pack. Should solve both problems!

 

Rich

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For anyone that cares, Motorcyclegear.com has a screaming closeout deal going on right now for First Gear's Rainman jacket and pants. The sizes are kind of limited, but I managed to just order an XL jacket (in yellow) and pants for myself and a pair of pants for my wife. $44 a piece is pretty good for quality rain gear.

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I have a pair of gerbings T5 "waterproof" gloves. Nice heated glove. One 40 degree commute I was hit with a soaking downpour. The gloves must have soaked up a few cups of water. The waterproof membrane that fits close to your skin keeps your hand dry. However, if it wasn't for the built in 15W heater, cranked, my hand would have froze! A waterproof layer under insulation does no good. On the bike, you can hardly tell if your hand is wet or dry.

 

So, beware of products that are waterproof but don't help the cause. If at all cool, even summer, you need an insulating layer under the waterproof shell.

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I'm with G-Rex. I bought a set of Frog Toggs and used them twice. Both times I ended up wet in less than 30 minutes of rainfall. I think they are probably ok for a light rain or short duration but anything more than that on on a bike they just don't cut it. Switched to Aerostich riding gear and that was the end of my rain worries.

 

If it starts to rain, I just zip the vents shut and I'm dry as can be. That being said, the leg pocket on the AD2 pants DOES leak in a bit of water as I normally like to carry my wallet there. I move it to my roadcrafter jacket pocket if it looks like an all day rain.

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