Jump to content

Repairing luggage rack subframe


DavidEBSmith

Recommended Posts

DavidEBSmith

Well, the subframe for the luggage rack on the RT has broken. This is the second one. Probably something to do with the bowling balls in the top case.

 

Anyway, it broke right behind the cross piece, at the spots shown in the illustration:

 

ubbthreads.php?ubb=download&Number=5964&filename=B0003422-2.gif

 

It would seem that it could be repaired and strengthened by inserting metal rod stock of an appropriate size into the hollow tubes that make up the subframe, and welding it back together.

 

Question is: I haven't measured the tube, but I'm betting that any rod I can find off the shelf will not fit and will have to be turned down. It would probably be easier to turn aluminum rod than steel rod.

 

Am I giving up too much strength if I go with aluminum rather than steel?

 

If I use aluminum, when I go to weld the outside tube with my cheap Harbor Fright wire-welder, will it melt the aluminum rod inside?

 

The replacement part is $170, is it worth my time to repair it (but probably make it stronger so it will never fail again?)

Link to comment

Richard Turk repaired his and had a post about it. I've been searching for it but without luck so far. If memory serves me, he used a steel rod on the inside.

 

McMasters-Carr has hex bar stock that would probably be much easier to grind to fit.

Link to comment

There is a good post somewhere about it. I just recently did mine. I think the post said to use a 10mm rod. I actusally ended up using a foundation anchor bolt. It fit perfectly. There is a seam on the inside of the of the tube and I had to grind a slot in the bolot so it would slide in. I also drilled a few holes in the tube and welded into them. It was a failry easy fix. Of course, my nephew is a sculptor and he has a good collection of wleding equipment.

 

 

Link to comment
Mmm, some people have magic powers in this forum. :grin:

 

hyjack

Before I became an immortal ;) I would often forget to check the setting at the bottom of the forum, where it shows DISPLAY OPTIONS. That setting can be adjusted to allow members to go further back in time through older threads. I don't remember what it maxed out at, but for those of us who whack the spammers it's set at Infinity :grin:

/hyjack

 

Link to comment

Dave, that happened to Kate's bike, on one side. I've seen her pack, I think she had one of your bowling balls. I know I did not not have anything special made, I think I found steel bar at the local Ace Hardware. Took the whole mess to a welder and he did the rest. I sold the bike years later so I don't know how long/if it has lasted.

Link to comment

Go with the same metal as the frame. This avoids several problems with galvanic corrosion and welding. If the insert is made well and at least 6" long you could even JB epoxy weld it in. My experience with a Harbor Freight welder is NOT good for metal this thin. And yes, it should be stronger than new when done right. Tubing could be used, but must be a little thicker than the original tubing even after being turned down.

Link to comment

Steer clear of the Aluminium insert. It may well cause problems with your weld integrity and not offer the additional strength you desire.

Andy

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...