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Model flexibility of bar risers


Bill Montgomery

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Bill Montgomery

I have a '97 R1100RT that had bar risers on it when I bought it. I'm thinking of an '07 or newer R1200RT. Question: will the risers on the oilhead fit the hexhead? Will there be enough bolts and nuts of the right lengths and sizes to just switch out. There are no markings on the risers to indicate manufacturer.

 

Thanks,

Bill Montgomery

Stanville, KY

'97 R1100RT

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Evening Bill

 

I believe they should fit the 1200RT through 09 but I think one of the fasteners on each side will be different. They definitely won’t fit the 2010 or 2011 RT as the bar attachment is different on those due to the bar dampening design.

 

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Hey Bill, welcome on board.

 

What WILL work is getting the '07 and learning to ride with no risers. It will re-pay your efforts 10 times over.

 

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I am 6' with arm measured 24" pit to tip if middle finger. They work for me. HOPZ, you look like a tall fellow. I have seen your post about preferring to equip your RT with out them. Just curious about you measurements.

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Bill Montgomery
Hey Bill, welcome on board.

 

What WILL work is getting the '07 and learning to ride with no risers. It will re-pay your efforts 10 times over.

 

Thanks, everybody for the info.

 

Hopz, expand on that a bit, willya. I've only had 2 bikes and this is the only one of the two that had risers. I thought it was a comfort measure, not a learning curve.

 

Thanks,

Bill

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Thanks for the opportunity to expand.

Tall? Yes, I am quite... er short. That being 5'6", 29/30 inseam, and in a dress shirt (whatever that was) 32 inches.

 

BMW designers have a reputation for building bikes that seem to fit very tall people. In fact it kept me from buying my first BMW for time measured in years. Finally my desire overcame my fears and the rest is history.

 

My rant on riding position and risers/bar backs takes up a bit of space so I will keep it as short (no pun intended) as I can.

 

Many of us came to European bikes by way of American bikes. This means we learned (mentally) to sit on a bike as if were in an easy chair. Our weight goes downward through our spine to our butts. Our lower backs are not really involved in support.

 

This posture leaves the upper body more or less vertical. The consequence of this is that our arms are way too short, so we introduce changes to the bike to make the grips come visit our hands. This also makes sense to us because we quickly learn that supporting our upper body with our wrists hurts. Thus Bar Backs and Risers.

 

Back to the posture thing. Notice that our feet are not really involved in this "cruiser" posture. They are out front acting as bug deflectors. They shift and brake but otherwise do not come to the party.

 

I had a lot of wrist pain. I installed bar backs. Still pain and discomfort. I even sold my beloved K1200RS because I could not get the grips far enough back. Stupid decision. Then I ran across MYRP. Master Yoda Riding Position, written by one of the members of this forum from way back. Dick Franz. His posts made sense to me and I studied and practiced the issue for several years before the lights finally came on. Google is your friend. Search/read/study/think/repeat.

 

European bikes are designed so that people sit on a bike differently. If you sit on a tall bar stool with your feet on the rungs of the stool and lean forward- you will get the idea. Your weight now has to be supported by your thighs, and also your feet. Your feet are under your thighs, not out front. If you press your feet downward you stand up. Interesting.... And, If your hands are pushed out front like your stool was several feet from the bar and you want another sip .. but I digress... your hands are out in space. Notice you are not using your hands to hold your body up at all. They are free to twist, and steer and clutch etc without being being bothered with the chore of holding your body up. In moto terms this is a highly desired state of affairs known as "soft hands". This is what you want. You want your back, feet and thighs to support your weight- not your hands. YES, you are leaned forward but you are not supporting your body with your hands- weird.

 

When I get old I may need to alter my perception of all this but since I am only 67 I have a while to go before I worry about it.

 

If any of you attempt to re-train your bodies to achieve this you will find that it does not come easy. It takes training- both physically and mentally... probably more mentally.. and it takes time and Effort. Yes, I know Effort.. yuk.

 

Go sit on your bike. Center stand, feet on the pegs. If you can lift your hands off the grips and not fall over you are on your way to soft hands and ultimately more comfort. I say ultimately because it takes time effort and muscle training.

 

No I did not lower my bike, but I did modify my OEM seat with thinner but stiffer foam. I also had it narrowed up front so that at stops my thighs are not spayed outward.

 

Bar backs as a Comfort measure not learning curve? Well as they say... comfort is in the eye of the beholder. I am far more comfortable in this posture that I was on my last 4 Harley touring bikes. I am far more comfortable than I was with bar backs on my first three BMWs.

 

Notice I never said it was easy. Note: I am not really all that judgmental about it. If you want bar backs and risers and they work for you- go for it.

 

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