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New-to-me '02 R1150RT


apirkle

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Picked up a 2002 R1150RT yesterday; only 6,601 miles on the clock. Been sitting in a garage for the last two years, so I'll be giving her a good once-over. Tips on how to proceed are more than welcome. I'm armed with a Clymer manual and hopefully a good bit of know-how from this site and others. I've done just a little bit of reading over the last few weeks while waiting to pick up the bike (arranging a trailer was more trouble than it should have been).

 

I work with the previous owner, and in light of our schedules, the dead battery, old gas, etc we decided the easiest thing to do was trailer it over to my garage. So I haven't actually started the bike up yet.

 

Pulled the fairings off last night and got the battery out and on the charger/desulfator. The battery is a BMW Exide gel battery that was installed in '09, just before the bike went into semi-unplanned hibernation. I'm not sure if it will come back to life, and regardless I'm thinking it will be best to just pick up a new one.

 

Here's the list of what I have planned:

 

- Charge battery (or install new battery)

- Drain old gas

- Install new fuel filter and air filter

- Replace 9 year old tires (new Michelin Pilot Road 2)

- Test ride and warm up for fluid changes

- Engine oil change

- Gear oil change (transmission and final drive)

- ABS flush

- Bleed clutch

- Change blinker fluid and muffler bearings (kidding :))

 

It had dealer service at ~5,400 miles so I figure I might wait a bit before doing a valve adjustment and throttle balance; I'll need to pick up a carb balancer or build a manometer rig before I can do the throttle balance anyways.

 

This bike's VIN shows that it's from the pre-ABS TSB run, so it has the original modulator that some folks were not so happy with. Considering the grief that new owners were given by BMW in trying to get this fixed, I'm sure that I'm SOL on getting anything from BMW since there was never a recall. But with what I paid for the bike, my thinking is that if the original modulator is really that terrible I can find a used modulator off a post-TSB bike and do the upgrade myself (probably needs the dealer's computer at some point?) and still come out ahead. Out of curiosity - any owners of pre-TSB bikes on here who are happy enough with the original modulator?

 

This is actually my first bike. Common wisdom certainly seems to be that this bike is perhaps a little too big and too powerful for a new rider, but that decision is made. I read through the helpful FAQ entry on this site about a RT as a first bike, so I think I'm going into this with my eyes open. I took the MSF course and will be wearing full gear of course.

 

Anyways, here's a picture from last night after pulling the fairings off. I'll get some proper photos after she's all back together and has a bath.

1215905583_WNybC-L.jpg

 

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Starfighter

Congrats on the new bike..you'll love it.

Do a canestorectomy while you're in there.

Also check ignition wiring as it comes out of the switch and heads downward....most have a zip tie too close to the switch that causes wires to break.....

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Good idea to replace the Exide Gel :thumbsup:. Folks experienced a few issues with the Exide Gel's and an Odyssey or a Westco are the popular replacements.

 

While you have the bike nekkid,I would also R&R the alternator belt...it's getting a bit old!

 

If you go the balancer route, I can heartily recommend the Morgan Carbtune over that damn Frog, battery dependent, electrickery contraption :grin:!

 

Before you get all nutsy about the brakes, take the bike out and ride it first. Remembering that the rear brake actuation is more sensitive....try just using the fronts at first then take a ride to a quiet road and just use your rear brakes ONLY for a while. This will give you some "muscle memory" just training on the rears....:thumbsup:. Worked for me......

 

Welcome to the asylum :eek:! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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+1 on the Odyssey or Westco battery. Gel batteries do not seem to work well in these bikes (Maybe not in anything).

I would add, if it has the original tires, (Likely at this mileage) I would swap 'em out before I rode it. 5 years is my limit on tires.......Some say 6, but you are looking at 9!

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+1 on the Odyssey or Westco battery. Gel batteries do not seem to work well in these bikes (Maybe not in anything).

I would add, if it has the original tires, (Likely at this mileage) I would swap 'em out before I rode it. 5 years is my limit on tires.......Some say 6, but you are looking at 9!

 

Definitely swapping out tires. I have a pair of Michelin PR2s on the way.

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Stan Walker

Out of curiosity - any owners of pre-TSB bikes on here who are happy enough with the original modulator?

 

I own an early '02 with the extra sensitive brakes..... It's been over 110,000 miles so far with no real complaints. I ride multiple bikes, some with out any ABS or power assist. You adapt.

 

Just take your time and get used to it slowly (pun intended)....

 

Of course this advice comes from someone with over 50 years of riding experience, so be careful.

 

 

Stan

 

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Repeat until it's second nature,

"Rear brake for parking lots and gravel"

"Rear brake for parking lots and gravel"

"Rear brake for parking lots and gravel"

"Rear brake for parking lots and gravel"

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Stan Walker

Repeat until it's second nature

 

REPEAT UNTIL YOU UNDERSTAND......

 

The '02 R1150 RT has FULLY LINKED brakes.

 

Please don't give bad advice!

 

Using just the rear brake is IMPOSSIBLE. Pressing the rear brake pedal activates BOTH the front and rear brakes.

 

Extreme caution and a gentle touch on the linked brakes while riding in gravel or low speed turns is required if you wish to stay upright.

 

Stan

 

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Stan, that is not so.

If you lightly depress the rear pedal, it only pulls on the rear brake.

So, for doing feet up manoeuvres, just gently dragging the rear brake gives that stability you need.

If you push the pedal harder, the Servo unit pulls in the front brake, steering geometry changes and all of a sudden it's a pain.

However, the earlier iABS bikes (like this 02 I believe), has a much more aggressive rear brake than the later ones. The master cylinder bore increased reducing leverage ratios.

When I removed the Servo from my O3 (with the later less aggressive rear brake, I actually fitted a much smaller bore from the 1100 model to improve rear brake power. (and love the non Servo brakes).

 

Andy

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Welcome, I have an early '02 RT also, it just happens to be the same color as yours. If you have qestions about anything you are in the right place. You may want to update your profile so people have a general idea of your location. You may even find someone willing to come and help you out. Get the maintenance done riding weather is either here or coming soon depending where you are.

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I have recently bought an 04 and I am very happy.This easily the nicest motorcycle I have ever owned. I am following your thread with interest. A few things I have learned in the last month or so....

The brakes are a little weird but I am quicky adapting. I agree with the gentle touch plan.

The seat although tolerable is not that great. I installed a used Rick Mayer saddle and it is amazing.

The bike really does prefer to run above 3500 rpm.

These are wonderful motorcycles, I could have bought a 1200 but in retrospect I am glad I put the difference in the bank and a smile on my face.

Good luck with your new bike. Mine is Blue as well the best color IMO

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I too own a 2002RT and I was under the impression that hitting the rear brake pedal did indeed activate the front brakes, and visa versa. This is the first I have read where hitting the back lightly would only activate the rear brake? I would appreciate any input on this as I like to know exactly how my bile works.

 

Stan, that is not so.

If you lightly depress the rear pedal, it only pulls on the rear brake.

So, for doing feet up manoeuvres, just gently dragging the rear brake gives that stability you need.

If you push the pedal harder, the Servo unit pulls in the front brake, steering geometry changes and all of a sudden it's a pain.

However, the earlier iABS bikes (like this 02 I believe), has a much more aggressive rear brake than the later ones. The master cylinder bore increased reducing leverage ratios.

When I removed the Servo from my O3 (with the later less aggressive rear brake, I actually fitted a much smaller bore from the 1100 model to improve rear brake power. (and love the non Servo brakes).

 

Andy

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I too own a 2003RT and I was under the impression that hitting the rear brake pedal did indeed activate the front brakes, and visa versa. This is the first I have read where hitting the back lightly would only activate the rear brake? I would appreciate any input on this as I like to know exactly how my bile works.

:lurk::lurk::lurk:

 

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Hennepinboy

2002 R1150RT 70,XXX mile and I have never had any problems with the brakes. I also own a 92 R100GS, R1200GSA and a Yamaha TT600N, I do not have problems switching between the brake system on the four.

Of all these bikes the R1150RT has the strongest brakes, will slam you into the tank if your not light on the levers.

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Thanks for all the comments so far. Slowly but surely making progress. After screwing around trying to siphon the old gas out for far too long, I decided to go ahead and just pull the fuel tank. Should have done that from the start - the quick disconnects make it so easy. I was worried about popping the wrong fitting off and having a few gallons of gas spill all over my garage.

 

Tires should be here tomorrow, so the next task is to pull the wheels off. Probably should have done that tonight but it's getting a little late so I'll leave it for tomorrow. I'll pick up a new battery when I'm out getting the tires mounted; the charger gave me the blinky light of death for the old battery.

 

Latest nekkid hotness:

1216776773_XoDvJ-L.jpg

 

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I own this bike, same vintage, same color.

 

You should get the fuel disconnects replaced under recall. I did it before I knew there was a recall, and it wasn't that bad, but it needs to be done.

 

Don't worry about the brakes. You'll get used to them, but do make an effort to get used to them. I'm not crazy about the design, and I've certainly not been crazy about the maintenance requirements, but I've learned to love them.

 

Consider getting a little geeky about the headlights. Mine fried it's main ground early. I replaced alot of the wiring with relays and beefed-up connections, which have not failed since.

 

Ditto on the alternator belt. Replace.

 

Inspect the clutch slave cylinder. Even on a low-mileage beuaty like yours, it's a failure point.

 

Inspect the rear brake hose, between the pedal and the metal tubing. Mine failed and I hear others' have too. Don't know if this is a function of time or use, but it's a cheap part only if you are not 1000 miles from a dealer.

 

Be VERY careful when you reassemble the tupperware not to strip the screws, especially the 6 in the tank. DAMHIK.

 

Otherwise, the only major problem I've had was at about 70K when the drive spilnes went south at a most inconvenient time. You should be OK there given the mileage, and I don't want to ruin your ride with worry. But keep it in mind.

 

She's been a great friend, my aquamint RT. I hope you enjoy yours.

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Neil,

In the later version of iABS, they added a reduced rear/front weighting and the rear pedal actually activates primarily the rear brake for an, albeit small, portion of its travel :thumbsup: .

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Make sure you flush the wheel circuits of the brakes while you have the tank off. Taking the tank off is the biggest part of the job.

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Make sure you flush the wheel circuits of the brakes while you have the tank off. Taking the tank off is the biggest part of the job.

 

Yep, good call. Planning to do the brake flush once I get a new battery.

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Neil,

In the later version of iABS, they added a reduced rear/front weighting and the rear pedal actually activates primarily the rear brake for an, albeit small, portion of its travel :thumbsup: .

 

Thanks phil, I didn't think my 02 would so this as I have played aroun with the brakes. I do like them as I finally got used to the linked system, pretty easy as it does my thinking for me :)

 

 

cheers

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Woohoo, tires came in! Got the wheels pulled off and hopefully I'll have time to drop them off to get the tires mounted tomorrow.

 

1217879347_aahg4-L.jpg

 

Found a little bit of corrosion in the rear wheel hub. As far as I can tell, this area is pretty much isolated from the rest of the final drive so it shouldn't be a big problem. Looks like some moisture got in; it's not entirely clear from the picture, but it looks like this spot was probably the low point when the bike was sitting. Figure I'll clean it up with a wire brush before I put the wheel back on.

1217879361_sQmFM-L.jpg

 

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That corrosion in the hub area is 'normal' - they pretty much ask for the corrosion to start because if is open to the elements.

As someone posted the other day, a little clean up, and a tad of corrosion inhibitor will control it nicely. Certainly nothing to worry about.

 

Andy

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Shop Tip -- using a wire coat hanger the side panels can be suspended from the garage door track, saving floor space and preventing accidental steps.

 

Might also run a ratchet strap from the forks to the center stand so it doesn't fold up from an accidental bump.

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While you are in there (and if you don't have a radio installed), you could remove the speakers, radio kit and wiring in and going into, the "glove box". It looks like you have them installed.

It will give you a load of storage room in the glove box and take about 15 pounds off the front of your bike. :thumbsup:

 

BTW - I used black duct tape to seal off the wiring bung hole left in the glove box.

 

 

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Glad the Mayer is appreciated ;-)

 

I have recently bought an 04 and I am very happy.This easily the nicest motorcycle I have ever owned. I am following your thread with interest. A few things I have learned in the last month or so....

The brakes are a little weird but I am quicky adapting. I agree with the gentle touch plan.

The seat although tolerable is not that great. I installed a used Rick Mayer saddle and it is amazing.

The bike really does prefer to run above 3500 rpm.

These are wonderful motorcycles, I could have bought a 1200 but in retrospect I am glad I put the difference in the bank and a smile on my face.

Good luck with your new bike. Mine is Blue as well the best color IMO [/quote

 

 

 

 

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While you are in there (and if you don't have a radio installed), you could remove the speakers, radio kit and wiring in and going into, the "glove box". It looks like you have them installed.

It will give you a load of storage room in the glove box and take about 15 pounds off the front of your bike.

 

While you're taking the speakers and radio mounting stuff out, put a 12 volt cigarette lighter outlet in the new "glove box" so you can charge your cell phone, etc. on the road. Easy to wire since there radio wires are right there and it's a good waterproof place for the phone.

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You should get the fuel disconnects replaced under recall. I did it before I knew there was a recall, and it wasn't that bad, but it needs to be done.

 

But won't BMW put on an almost as lousy grade of plastic QD? The problem reappeared two years after the dealer handled this item on recall so I did the upgrade myself using a kit of beemerboneyard.

 

Ditto on the alternator belt. Replace.
I concur 100+. Oh, and make sure you get the right belt for your VIN!

 

Inspect the clutch slave cylinder. Even on a low-mileage beuaty like yours, it's a failure point.

 

Like above, concur 100+. A fellow forum member who headed for Redmond, OR, after last year's Sierra UnRally suffered a total failure in his. Boy, talk about being SOL on the side of the road in the middle of no where not to mention the eventual cost of having it done at a dealer! His RT spent most if not all of its life in a hot, humid area which may have added to the corrosion they found in the assembly. Consider yourself forewarned.

 

 

Be VERY careful when you reassemble the tupperware not to strip the screws, especially the 6 in the tank. DAMHIK.
What he said 100+. Of all the tupperware screws for the RT these are the ones YOU DO NOT WANT TO CROSS THREAD!

 

Otherwise, the only major problem I've had was at about 70K when the drive splines went south at a most inconvenient time. You should be OK there given the mileage, and I don't want to ruin your ride with worry. But keep it in mind.
This is the only point you raise that I disagree with. I've come to learn the hard way that the '02 model year suffers an inordinately high rate of pline shaft failures/troubles/hassles, etc. I belive it involved something like poor quality lube used at time of production and/or improper application thereof. Regardless, this is something you should tackle sooner than later as the lube's almost assuredly dried up by now. The potential cost of ignoring spline lube maintenance is major league moola. DAMHIK.

 

Aside from all this I'd like to join the others here who've welcomed you to this site. I look forward to reading your riding and ownership stories!

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Got a new battery (Odyssey PC680, didn't really want to spend that much but it was the only thing other than a $180 BMW Exide gel battery that I could find locally after trying 9 different places), got the 2 yr old gas drained, installed a new fuel filter, did the brake flush (wheel and control circuits), removed the radio bracket (leaving the wiring in place for now - I like the earlier suggestion about wiring in a phone charger) and got everything back together and buttoned up.

 

Put in 2 gallons of 93 octane and was so optimistic that I put on all my gear and backed down the driveway to start it up. Cranked over a few times... nothing. Leaned the bike to the right to make sure the pump was getting enough gas... nada.

 

Went ahead and put in new spark plugs in case the old ones were fouled (just going through some troubleshooting from the Clymer manual here...). Tried to crank again, turns over fine but still not firing up.

 

Can't hear the fuel pump running when I turn the key on. Checked online... yep, it should come on. Checked the fuel pump fuse. It was blown. Put in a new fuse (10A, same as the old blown one). It blew too.

 

Pulled the fairings back off and hooked up the trickle charger - I did a good bit of cranking while troubleshooting so I'll let the battery charge back up tonight.

 

Pulled the fuel pump connector and pins 1, 2 and 4 are all shorted together (< 2 ohms). Looking at a wiring diagram, it appears that perhaps 1 and 2 should be shorted together via the pump motor winding? But pin 4 looks like it goes to a relay - not sure that one should be shorted. Maybe I shorted out some wires inside the tank when I pulled the pump assembly to change the fuel filter?

 

Another possibility is maybe the old gas gunked up the pump and it's stalling, but I don't hear any sounds at all coming from the tank when I turn the key.

 

Any thoughts?

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Randy, are you implying that Houston is HOT and HUMID????

 

Regarding the early 02 brakes; yep, the foot lever is super-sensitive. It took me a year to break my life-long hand foot brake coordination habits. Use the front only at low speed, or when cranked over in a corner. Your booted foot just does not provide enough touch sensitivity and over-braking is almost the rule. Practice, practice, practice when coming to a stop straight up on dry pavement will help a lot if you want to use the foot lever.

 

Ken

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---

Pulled the fuel pump connector and pins 1, 2 and 4 are all shorted together (< 2 ohms). Looking at a wiring diagram, it appears that perhaps 1 and 2 should be shorted together via the pump motor winding? But pin 4 looks like it goes to a relay - not sure that one should be shorted. Maybe I shorted out some wires inside the tank when I pulled the pump assembly to change the fuel filter?--

 

Any thoughts?

 

 

Morning apirkle

 

1,2 & 4 (appearing) to short together (by ohmmeter) doesn’t surprise me. 1 & 2 are the only ones to worry about as they are the pump power supply and ground. The 4 is the low fuel warning and will switch to ground (1) at certain fuel levels.

 

Difficult to say what you really have there but it sort of sounds like the pump impeller is gummed up and stuck.

 

The correct thing to do is remove the pump then the squirt something like WD-40 into the impeller area then reach in with a dull dental pick or bent wire and give the impeller a spin. That will usually free up the impeller and get the pump operational.

 

The other less effective but (might work) is to remove the fuel pressure hose at the connector, then fill the hose with WD-40, then lightly blow into the hose to force the WD-40 back through the filter and into the pump impeller cavity. Then wait a couple of days for the WD-40 to (hopefully) soften the varnish sticking the pump impeller than try to power the pump through terminal’s 1 & 2. -- 2 being power and 1 being the ground. Then try reversing the power to 1 being the power and 2 being the ground (this will try to spin the impeller backwards and hopefully free it.

 

 

 

---

Another possibility is maybe the old gas gunked up the pump and it's stalling, but I don't hear any sounds at all coming from the tank when I turn the key.

 

This is more than likely what you are fighting with (pretty common on a bike that sits with old gas in tank)

 

 

 

 

 

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The correct thing to do is remove the pump then the squirt something like WD-40 into the impeller area then reach in with a dull dental pick or bent wire and give the impeller a spin. That will usually free up the impeller and get the pump operational.

 

Thanks for the tip. I suspected that this might be the problem; glad to have some confirmation. I'll get the tank pulled again and check it out.

 

Adam

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Pulled the fuel pump this afternoon. Definitely seized up. The impeller will move back and forth just a few degrees and then it hits what feels like a pretty hard stop (firm, not mushy). When I hook it up to 12V (only momentarily) it twitches a little and then nothing.

 

Sprayed some Berryman B12 carb cleaner in it and worked the impeller back and forth, but that seems to have had no effect. So it looks like I'll be ordering a new pump.

 

Any thoughts on the pumps that Beemer Boneyard sells? They have an "aftermarket" and "OEM replica" with a $50 price difference. I'm tempted to go with the OEM replica just to be sure there are no fitment issues that I have to screw around with. It also looks like the "aftermarket" pump has some electrical connections that you have to use to tie in to 12V inside the tank. I'm really wary of putting any extra electrical connections inside the tank.

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Afternoon apirkle

 

Can’t comment on Beemer Boneyard pumps as I usually either order an OEM from Chicago BMW (long shipping time) or install a GM auto fuel pump (that takes some fabrication and adaption).

 

Before ordering try filling the pump “completely” with WD-40 or similar then let it sit overnight. Don’t forget that fuel passes through the pump armature so you might have gum and varnish in the armature area. Might even try HOT WD-40 or hot oil as that can loosen sticky varnish.

 

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Randy, are you implying that Houston is HOT and HUMID????

 

Regarding the early 02 brakes; yep, the foot lever is super-sensitive. It took me a year to break my life-long hand foot brake coordination habits. Use the front only at low speed, or when cranked over in a corner. Your booted foot just does not provide enough touch sensitivity and over-braking is almost the rule. Practice, practice, practice when coming to a stop straight up on dry pavement will help a lot if you want to use the foot lever.

 

Ken

 

Apirkle,

 

Now you know WHO got stranded on the side of the road on his way to Redmond!.

 

Ken, compared to where I live Houston's like living your life in a shower. That reminds me of a story about a Houston-based buddy and his helmet. I'll save that for the MC related forum.

 

As for the blown fuel pump fuse I'm wonder if there's a vapor or air lock in the fuel filter hosing.

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Well, the bike is all back together. Wound up installing the aftermarket pump from Beemer Boneyard. Their pump is a Walbro 5CA400 - might save someone a few bucks down the road. I didn't need all the o-rings, hose clamps, extra fuel pump, etc that comes in their kit since I had already bought their kit to change the fuel filter. Oh well.

 

Some of the bits of immersion-rated fuel line in the tank were getting pretty ratty and starting to crumble, so I replaced those. $28/ft for SAE 30R10 immersion-rated fuel line at Napa, ouch. Local BMW dealer didn't have any in stock.

 

After changing the fuel pump the bike fired right up. Awesome! Rides great.

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Changed the motor oil, transmission gear oil and final drive gear oil today after getting the bike nice and warm. The old motor oil looked almost new - it was changed about 1200 miles ago, but then the bike sat for about 2 years. New fill is Castrol 25W50 synthetic blend.

 

Transmission fluid also looked very clean. The gear that can been seen from the fill port looked to be in great shape. Filled with Castrol Hypoy C 75W90 gear oil.

 

The final drive fluid on the other hand was completely black and the oil was magnetic. No visible metal particles - nothing shiny. But there was most certainly a black sludge stuck to the magnetic drain plug, and I could "pick up" the oil with the magnet. Also was able to deflect the thin stream of oil draining out of the FD by putting the magnet close to it, so it obviously had quite a bit of metal in it.

 

Is this at all normal for what I'm assuming is this bike's first final drive oil change? Or is it a sign that there's something wrong with the final drive? I'm thinking that perhaps I should flush it with gear oil a few times over the next few weeks to try and get as much of the metal out as possible.

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The final drive fluid on the other hand was completely black and the oil was magnetic. No visible metal particles - nothing shiny. But there was most certainly a black sludge stuck to the magnetic drain plug, and I could "pick up" the oil with the magnet. Also was able to deflect the thin stream of oil draining out of the FD by putting the magnet close to it, so it obviously had quite a bit of metal in it.

 

Is this at all normal for what I'm assuming is this bike's first final drive oil change? Or is it a sign that there's something wrong with the final drive? I'm thinking that perhaps I should flush it with gear oil a few times over the next few weeks to try and get as much of the metal out as possible.

 

As long as there are no metal pieces like you would get while drilling with a sharp drill, you may be ok. I would change it early, just to get as much out as possible, but it may be its first change, as you surmise, and extra metal could be expected then. It really should have been changed at 600 miles, and I would consider using that distance for your subsequent change. If it looks better then, you can extend it to 6k changes. It is only a couple of ounces anyway.

 

This vintage of RT did have a higher than would be expected history of FD failure, but generally not before 12k or more. Good luck.

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I'm new here also, and not nearly as mechanically inclined as you (obviously) are. I have the 03' model in the Biarritz Blue which I believe is the same color (not the other color mentioned). Color-rite has the paint if you need touch-up.

I'm curious if that is the stock 02' exhaust. Looks like a Remus tip. My biggest issue was surging at city speeds. Dealer service mgr. re-tweaked throttle body sync and discovered a bad TPS (12k and 24k had just been done to satisfy putting it in on consignment). Didn't they stick the computer on it for the services?! Anyway, it was way better but still there a bit so I pulled the pink ccp plug from the fuse box and it's better still, plus a bit more lower end to help fend off the tall 1st gear. Why did they put such a tall 1st on this 6 speed? 2nd complaint was the angle of the seat. It looks nice and flat, but downshift hard and introduce your crotch to the tank. Took it up to Bill Mayer Saddles (all of 15 miles away) in at 7 a.m. out at 9 a.m. Rocky the owner and his head upholstery guy recommended bar backs also even though I'm 6'. They said I'd get rid of the behind the shoulderblade ache and sit more comfortably. I checked out the available risers and decided on the Iliums. They go up and back quite a bit and look very clean. There are two plates on each side, the top one tapers so it looks like it belongs on the bike. Another model showed the 2 forward screws and then bolted on. The seat and bar backs are very comfortable, but I haven't been on another trip yet to tell for sure. I bought the bike on a Thursday and Friday took off for a 1000 mile weekend and other than sliding forward felt great - had the stock 'comfort' seat.

Not to totally changed the subject, but have any of you out there put a two brothers exhaust on your 1100 or 1150RT's?

I've always preferred to hear my exhaust more than my valve train while riding, but not interested in extremely loud pipes.

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I'm curious if that is the stock 02' exhaust.

 

The exhaust is a Staintune, which was installed by the previous owner. I like the sound; not loud enough to annoy the neighbors, although it certainly doesn't sound like a sewing machine. While riding (helmet on of course) it's audible but again not really that loud.

 

He also put on a Sargent seat, which so far is very comfortable, but I haven't done any long rides yet. I'm about 6'0" and at the moment I have the seat in the lowest position right now to give me a little more control at stops, as I'm getting used to a heavy bike.

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A few iPhone pictures now that she's all back together and got a quick wash. Still planning to do a thorough detailing when I have time and then I'll drag out the SLR camera. Been riding with just the top case - but I do have the side cases.

1231449640_Uyso6-L.jpg

 

1231449645_WBmZZ-L.jpg

 

Figured out how to jam both cars and a bike in the garage.

1231449806_mkTY9-L.jpg

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I'm new here also .
Welcome to the board

I have the 03' model in the Biarritz Blue which I believe is the same color (not the other color mentioned).Color-rite has the paint if you need touch-up.
Apirkles bike doesn't look like Biaritz blue to me. However wrt the Color-ite touch up paint. I had a 2001 Biaritz Blue 1150RT, then changed it to a 2003 Biaritz Blue. The shades are very different. I have some side by side shots and you can see how VERY different they are.....so be careful. I recommend getting your touch up paint mixed and matched to your own bikes paint code.

 

My biggest issue was surging at city speeds. ...... .
Lots of info on this site (and recently) about surging, where to start and what to look for.

 

..complaint was the angle of the seat.- had the stock 'comfort' seat.
Before spending any money on seats or risers, try fitting a 3/8" spacer under the seat adjusting mech. This transforms the comfort of the seat, and has a direct effect on if your shoulders ache or not.

Andy

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