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Fuel filter '96 r1100rt


Bruce (Bedford)

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Bruce (Bedford)

Those following '96 r1100rt abs will know I'm putting my RT back together. The tank goes on tomorrow and then I get to start it - yehee!!

BUT

Should I use the opportunity to change the fuel filter? I wasn't planning to but as the tank is off...

It seems to be a bit f a phaff what with opening up the tank, UK fuel is good, good, good just very, VERY expensive - see todays all time high price!!!!

Opinions guys...

Bedford

 

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Should I use the opportunity to change the fuel filter? I wasn't planning to but as the tank is off...

I believe BMW recommends replacing them every 12k miles. If it's anywhere near due definitely change it now. Why wait?

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and a new rubber O'ring for the gauge plate (part number 16141341008).

 

+1

The old "O" ring will swell when it is removed. Have a new one on hand and avoid the headache of trying (unsuccessfully)to refit the old one.

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and a new rubber O'ring for the gauge plate (part number 16141341008).

 

+1

The old "O" ring will swell when it is removed. Have a new one on hand and avoid the headache of trying (unsuccessfully)to refit the old one.

 

Ummm... not really... If you spray some wd40 around the metal plate like half an hour before you remove it, the o-ring will stay in place. You can mount the flange back as the ring will not move from it's place ;)

 

It's good to have a new one, and I suggest you change it while you are in there, but where I live, the o-ring dealer does not have such big ones on stock and the bmw dealer only delivers every 67 days since the order has been placed.

 

Dan.

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...Should I use the opportunity to change the fuel filter? I wasn't planning to but as the tank is off...

.

 

If you get a service kit from motorworks (say) their kit includes oil filter, air filter fuel filter (I think) plus O-rings and plugs etc.

The thing is, if the bike is new to you then yuo will know you have a nice clean unit installed. My friend's bike at a very elevated mileage never replaced his filter ( and niether have I). I have to advise caution when doing the job. Be careful of internal wiring and gauge sender units. It is possible to bend internal bits and bobs.

In intself the job is an easy task.

Make sure your tank is as empty as possible before you start.

While doing the job, it is worth trying to flush the inside of the tank to shift any debris at the bottom of the tank too.

Once done, I would suggest if you are travelling just in the UK or local Europe, the fuel is so clean you would probably never need to change it again.

 

Andy

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And if you get the tank off the bike, check the water draining hole in the filler neck. Mine was stuffed with dirt and rust so all the water coming from rain would leak inside the tank everytime I got it opened to refuel.

 

About the clean gas... I really don't know how clean it is. My RT was ridein in Germany for 13 years and here for 2 years. It now has 60k km's showing on the odometer. I changed the fuel filter and when I turned it upside down, there was some black dirt like coming out of it along with the gas trapped inside. I believe this is the OEM fuel filter that the bike had since new!

 

Dan.

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No need to change the big O ring - I've successfully used the original several times. All you have to do is let it dry out and use a bit of grease to hold it in place while refitting the plate. I originally did this because the new one supplied by Motorworks was too big to fit. I had acquired several over the years because they always supply one with the service kit. All the new ones I had were too large - I don't know why. In the event I simply re-used the original and have now done this several times on both my oilheads with no problems.

 

My advice would be to use fuel hose clips rather then the original Oetiker clips; don't use jubilee clips. Care is needed in removing the plate and in removing the filter, so as not to damage the "sock" filter on the inlet side of the pump - these are quite pricey.

 

As others have said, I would definitely replace the filter now - it should then be a long time before you need to do it again, unless you fill up with contaminated fuel.

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Bruce (Bedford)

Hi Dan

I couldn't be fussed to do the filter!

What I actually mean is that I did a risk assessment and decided that even though the tank was off and everything readily accessible with 40k miles (60k km??) on the clock and never having had fuel filter problems with petrol cars (unlike diesel where I always changes the fuel filter, mainly water issues..) it was not a first priority issue and not likely to effect the next year or two’s riding.

Without doubt the tank will come off again in the next year or so. Eventually I want to re-spray all of the plastic jet black, I hate the blue/green colour – why BMW why??

 

Say Dan, where in Romania are you? My big trip this summer is to be Krakow (for Auschwitz) then on to Transylvania since it has been in the news here recently as our Prince Charles has sustainable farming interests there. The reports described an area that I ‘must’ see (as long as I don’t get my neck bitten – that is a story isn’t it????!!!)

As far as I can tell being in the EU means I can just hop on my r1100rt and ride there, how good is that eh?

 

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Hi Dan

 

Without doubt the tank will come off again in the next year or so. Eventually I want to re-spray all of the plastic jet black, I hate the blue/green colour – why BMW why??

 

Say Dan, where in Romania are you? My big trip this summer is to be Krakow (for Auschwitz) then on to Transylvania since it has been in the news here recently as our Prince Charles has sustainable farming interests there. The reports described an area that I ‘must’ see (as long as I don’t get my neck bitten – that is a story isn’t it????!!!)

As far as I can tell being in the EU means I can just hop on my r1100rt and ride there, how good is that eh?

 

Since you will only be riding the RT on the paved road, why not consider getting carbon fiber look-alike foil on it? Thatstuff is ~ 2 mm thick and makes the bike look like the SS Enterprise in Star Treck :D

 

I live in the center of Transilvania. There's a lot to see here but I think you will like Austria more than Ro, because of the stupid f**king cage drivers around here.

 

And if you come here, it's a good thing to mount some garlic on the bike's mirrors, just in case :D:))

 

Dan.

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The old "O" ring will swell when it is removed. Have a new one on hand and avoid the headache of trying (unsuccessfully)to refit the old one.
I believe that it is the opposite. The o-ring swells in contact with gasoline. You need to let it dry out for a few days (shrink) before reusing to ensure a good seal. Mine seeped a bit for a day and then 'took up'.
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Cage drivers?

 

An affectionate term used for car drivers (and for that matter vans, lorries, busses and anything else that cages the driver in and causes the comatose condition that makes the aim fur us motorcyclists!).

 

Andy

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Being a cage driver and a 'biker' aren't mutually exclusive! Lot's of us ride and drive. It's more an issue of competents and idiots.

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Being a cage driver and a 'biker' aren't mutually exclusive! Lot's of us ride and drive. It's more an issue of competents and idiots.
I thought that it was more of an issue of vulnerability.
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CaptainKcorb

BMW recommending a fuel filter change every 12k miles seems to be driven by a desire for cash movement. From our pockets to theirs.

 

My first filter was changed at 100Kkms (60k miles) because one of the BMW crimp-on hose clamps failed. The filter was clean and clear. I changed it again last winter at 160Kkms (100K miles) and it was perfect as far as I could tell. The reusable screw type clamps are doing fine.

 

I'll likely change it again in a couple of years when the mileage gets around 250Kkms and expect it to be fine once again. I'd think a planned change every 5 years or 50k miles would be more than enough. Definitely shelf the crimp-ons and use good quality hose clamps.

 

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Being a cage driver and a 'biker' aren't mutually exclusive! Lot's of us ride and drive. It's more an issue of competents and idiots.
I thought that it was more of an issue of vulnerability.

 

The point I was making is that not all drivers are bad and not all riders are competent. Obviously in a collision a biker will be more likely to suffer injury.

 

Anyway, enough of this thread hijack.

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I thought it was 24,000 mile, not 12.

If bike is over 40k why not do it as it may have the original and isn't far from the 48k interval.

YMMV

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I thought it was 24,000 mile, not 12.

If bike is over 40k why not do it as it may have the original and isn't far from the 48k interval.

YMMV

I agree. Do you know for a fact that the bike has never sat for a period of time with stale gas in it or has never had a bad tank of fuel?
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The old "O" ring will swell when it is removed. Have a new one on hand and avoid the headache of trying (unsuccessfully)to refit the old one.
I believe that it is the opposite. The o-ring swells in contact with gasoline. You need to let it dry out for a few days (shrink) before reusing to ensure a good seal. Mine seeped a bit for a day and then 'took up'.

 

I believe I said "swells up" as in the "O" ring gets larger. Mine grew by about 5%. Sure you can wait 3 days for it to "shrink", but who wants to sit around for days waiting for a $2.00 part to shrink when they can order a new one with the filter and finish the job all at the same time? :S

 

Now I have my old one as a spare for the next fuel filter change.

 

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The o-ring does not swell when it is removed. It swells when it is exposed to gasoline. If you leave it out in the sun for the afternoon, that will usually dry it out (latitude and season dependent, or course). YMMV.

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The o-ring does not swell when it is removed. It swells when it is exposed to gasoline. If you leave it out in the sun for the afternoon, that will usually dry it out (latitude and season dependent, or course). YMMV.

 

I have read that if you heat it using a hair dryer or so it goes back to intial size ;) I did not test this, I just read about it.

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