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Natche

Where are your feet when you are stopped?

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Natche

Sounds like a simple question but it never occurred to me that I might be using a less than ideal tactic when I stop. Typically, I put my left foot down and my right remains on the brake with the bike slightly tilted to the left. The bike is in first gear by the time I am stopped so I ready to accelerate out of the way of any one who might be bearing down on me. This also works well on hills as it keeps me still until the clutch engages and eliminates have to roll on while fingering the front brake, which is can be a bit tricky.

 

I know there's a possibility that I could fall over to the right but I've never had an instance where it seemed likely. Plus, it's real easy to slide the foot off the brake if balance becomes an issue.

 

Lately, when it's flat I've been putting both feet down as I've read some things here that lead me to believe that I might be better off developing this habit. The one foot habit is probably a hold over from my dual sport, which had a higher seat.

 

What do you think?

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Danny caddyshack Noonan

There's no real need for both feet down. I've always done the right foot down instead of the left. I ride a bit different than most in that I won't take my feet off the pegs until stopped or almost stopped...like a couple inches.

Neutral gear with clutch covered. Throw out bearings wear out.

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Joe Frickin' Friday

I often stop with just one foot on the ground. Often it's the right foot, not sure why; I use the front brake to keep the bike still, and I've never had issues with applying throttle under these circumstances.

 

With one foot down, the bike needs to be deliberately leaned in that direction in order to be stable, which means heavier loads on the planted leg. Sometimes that leg gets tired, and so I'll end up putting both legs down; in this situation the bike can be kept vertical, resulting in very light loads on either leg, much less fatiguing.

 

Throwout bearings do wear out, but that takes a long time, and rear-end collisions are costly and painful. When stopping, I'll keep the bike in gear until there's a car stopped right behind me, but after that, I go to neutral and let the clutch out until the light turns green.

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Ken H.
left foot down and my right remains on the brake with the bike slightly tilted to the left. The bike is in first gear by the time I am stopped so I ready to accelerate out of the way of any one who might be bearing down on me. This also works well on hills as it keeps me still until the clutch engages and eliminates have to roll on while fingering the front brake, which is can be a bit tricky.

I think your method is exactly correct. (Qualifier

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tallman

1st gear, clutch

If in turn lane, foot away from traffic is down.

If straight ahead, both feet, sometimes just one, checking rear view at all times.

As Mitch said, if a vehicle stops behind me I may put in neutral if I want to give hand a break but still wary of multiple rear end collisions.

If ground is uneven, and no traffic, vary based on terrain, often 2 feet.

It all depends on the where and why of the stop.

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upflying

EZ question to answer. Which foot down depends on your lane position when stopped. If you are in the right wheel position, your right foot is down. If you are stopped in the left wheel position, your left foot is down. This is intended to keep your feet out of the oily strip in the middle of the lane. Obviously you should never come to a stop directly on top of the oil.

The only time both feet are down is when I am doing the waddle to back up or stopped next to a gas pump filling my tank.

Both feet down is unprofessional and unnecessary when stopped.

As others suggested, always in first gear, ready to move (lane split) if you see a threat in your six.

Edited by upflying

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tallman

Both feet down allows one to draw a weapon faster, IMO.

:lurk:

"Professional" riders don't put their feet down until after the race...

:grin:

People who ride their motos at work don't list professional motorcycle rider on the tax return do they?

:wave:

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Dave39

Since I'm not a professional I put both feet down. As a relative newbie the bike has felt like it was going over on the non-foot side a few times.

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Mister Tee

Usually, when I find a threat in my six, I make sure my pants are zipped up.

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BluegrassPicker

Who is going to admit to both feet up?

 

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BerndM

Both feet down, bike in first gear.

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JoeR

MSF recommends having the left foot down first so you can continue to use the rear brake until completely stopped. After my MSF course, I just put my left foot down, but I slipped a few times and almost had the bike go over, so I try to maintain a neutral balance and use both feet to maintain it.

 

I can see benefits to either approach.

 

 

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4wheeldog

The smarta$$ed answer is "Attached to my ankles, and in my boots".

 

I generally put my left down first, but it all depends on the terrain.....on a slope, I feel more in control with my uphill foot down, with a slight lean uphill.

Normally, I leave it in gear, clutch in, for a fast gettaway. When I am going to be there awhile, I shut the engine off in gear, leaving me free of clutch and brake duties. Then, when it is time to go, I pull in the clutch, tickle the button and go. So far, my bike has always started.

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ShovelStrokeEd

I come to a full and complete stop, then take my feet off the pegs and put both on the ground. If I'm not thinking about it, I might wait 10-30 seconds before removing feet from pegs. If I DO think about it, I have about 2 seconds to get a foot down.

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CoarsegoldKid
The smarta$$ed answer is "Attached to my ankles, and in my boots".

 

That's what I...

Just keep your feet out of the oil and sand/asphalt pebbles. You didn't ask but as for what to do with the gears and such. Think about how long it takes to drop the bike in gear after it has been idling in neutral. Sometimes I have to operate the clutch and toe action a few times before it goes into first. So in my case if there isn't a car behind me I'm likely to be in first gear ready to move if I can even detect impending danger. If there is a car behind me I am likely to slip into neutral. I always look for the amber light for the cross traffic and when I see it I drop into first gear. At stop signs I may never put my feet down. It depends on the situation.

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Natche
MSF recommends having the left foot down first so you can continue to use the rear brake until completely stopped. After my MSF course, I just put my left foot down, but I slipped a few times and almost had the bike go over, so I try to maintain a neutral balance and use both feet to maintain it.

 

I can see benefits to either approach.

 

 

That was my thought on why I should consider putting both down. I've never had that problem but then again, nothing ever happens until it happens. I will say that I am usually on the left side of the lane unless I am turning right and I always looking out for the oil in the center and watching behind me, flashing my brakes a bit if there is a car following. I also try to leave some space ahead of me so I can continue to roll up some or get out of the way if the car behind looks like he's/she's not going to stop. I find my self doing this in the car too.

 

Hey look, 51 posts, I'm now a "member"!

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Francois_Dumas

Bike in first gear, left foot making sure it doesn't pop out of gear, right foot on the ground. That's how we are officially taught where I'm from.

 

Gear in first, left foot down and right foot on brake when stopped on steep incline.

 

Two feet down when I am about to fall over...... :grin:

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russell_bynum

This is one of those "you guys could analyze a haircut" posts that Gleno loved so much. :grin:

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ShovelStrokeEd
This is one of those "you guys could analyze a haircut" posts that Gleno loved so much. :grin:

 

True 'dat. :(

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rad

Like most, it is left foot down and in gear. Sometimes both feet down and in neutral if cars are stacked up behind.

 

Another variable is dealing with severe road camber. My foot on the high side of the bike is the one that goes down.

 

Edited by rad

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tonyla

I believe left foot down first for a different reason.

It is vital to stop using both brakes EVERY time you stop.

 

this will ensure that when the time comes to conduct a true

 

PANIC stop your muscle memory will be able to take over the situation. I even check for traffic behind me, especially coming off a highway ramp approaching a stop sign and then pratice Panic stops two or three times. Its also a great time to see what the bike(and ABS if you have it) can do.

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SPG

The way I was trained as a motorcop; left foot down, 1st gear, clutch in,foot on brake. Look ahead while checking mirrors.

Edited by SPG

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Rockrib

Having been recently rear ended while sitting in traffic I will say that 'in gear, hand on throttle' is the way to be. Right foot on brake keeps your brake light lit. Being able to 'lurch' forward could make all the difference. What could have been a long hospital stay followed by a lengthy re-hab wound up being nothing more than a pesky insurance claim. That's my two cents.

 

Ken

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tallman
This is one of those "you guys could analyze a haircut" posts that Gleno loved so much. :grin:

 

I'm pretty sure that people tend to put the foot opposite the part in their hair down most of the time.

Bald riders put both feet down.

:lurk:

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moshe_levy

Every course I've taken (MSF, Jim Ford, Ride Like a Pro) had the approach of left foot down, right foot on brake, bike in first gear, looking ahead and scanning mirrors.

 

-MKL

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upflying

It appears we do agree that any discussion about which feet down will reach the same consensus as which engine oil or tire to use.

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Mister Tee

Except that we only have to worry about arguing about a maximum of four foot positions.

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Francois_Dumas
Except that we only have to worry about arguing about a maximum of four foot positions.

 

Even that is debatable.... where do you keep your feet after falling over keeping them up :rofl: !!??

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ragtoplvr

I always put both feet down. Between the wind and the stuff on the roads here, is safer.

 

I always take both feet off the pegs and out in free space maybe a second before stopping, in case my riding pants or something like a pants cuff hangs up I have a bit of time to fix it. At the time of the stop I put both feet down until I am good and set, compensated for wind etc. This is usually one motion, just slowly putting feet out, then down. I have semi linked brakes, so the hand lever gets both.

 

I think this comes from the bicycle, when I learned the folly of waiting until the last second to unclip. Since a "resting" beemer is a bit heavier than a bike, it just carries over, 2 wheels is 2 wheels.

 

Then if I have a wait, I will shift into neutral.

 

Rod

Edited by ragtoplvr

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Silver Surfer/AKAButters

I've always learned left foot down, brake covered, in gear, blah, blah, blah. However, in practice I find my self to be highly variable dictated by road and traffic conditions, state of muind. level of fatigue, etc. Yeah, kinda like oil and tires. Whatever works.

 

Rich

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Mister Tee
Except that we only have to worry about arguing about a maximum of four foot positions.

 

Even that is debatable.... where do you keep your feet after falling over keeping them up :rofl: !!??

 

Good point!

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tallman
I've always learned left foot down, brake covered, in gear, blah, blah, blah. However, in practice I find my self to be highly variable dictated by road and traffic conditions, state of muind. level of fatigue, etc. Yeah, kinda like oil and tires. Whatever works.

 

Rich

 

 

Good point.

I wonder if it matters whether I have leather or synthetic soles?

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motorman587
EZ question to answer. Which foot down depends on your lane position when stopped. If you are in the right wheel position, your right foot is down. If you are stopped in the left wheel position, your left foot is down. This is intended to keep your feet out of the oily strip in the middle of the lane. Obviously you should never come to a stop directly on top of the oil.

The only time both feet are down is when I am doing the waddle to back up or stopped next to a gas pump filling my tank.

Both feet down is unprofessional and unnecessary when stopped.

As others suggested, always in first gear, ready to move (lane split) if you see a threat in your six.

 

 

 

That is old school Sir, lol, we teach new cop riders to keep the right foot on the brake and the left down. Safety first , there is no more dirty lane..............

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by motorman587

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upflying

Could be old school. CHP taught me back in '89.

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motorman587
Could be old school. CHP taught me back in '89.

Holy crap, 1989, if motorcycle were still using technology from 1989...........lol just kidding, love ya bro!!!!

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tallman

One of my pairs of boots are 20 years older than that.

Should I retire them?

:grin:

:wave:

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Paul Mihalka

Hijack/ My 40 year old boots still fit - not much else... :) /hijack

 

By the way: When I stop my feet are on the ground, most of the time...

 

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Hollow Road Rider
The way I was trained as a motorcop; left foot down, 1st gear, clutch in,foot on brake. Look ahead while checking mirrors.

 

That's the way I learned it from a motor officer. He called it "Clean Foot/ Dirty Foot".

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SuperG

Interesting tread,

 

TO answer the OP's original question, it depends, too many scenarios and possibilities.

 

I have linked brakes, I hardly use the rear brakes, only on uphill stops when I need both hands for digging out a garage door opener or something.

 

Coming to a stop sign, right foot down , left kept on the shifter, since I am taking off and shifting in the next 2 seconds.

 

Stopping at a stop light (intersection with traffic)

I cruise to a stop, bike in neutral clutch out, both feet on the ground - lifting my butt of the seat the get some fresh air in there :rofl:

 

I guess I am a bad rider. (First step toward recovery is admittance.... is it?)

 

PS: I am short (5'9") , I need all the footing I can get.

 

 

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Dan M

I usually have left foot down, in gear but it varies by pavement condition / crown.

The one constant is with a passenger I always have both feet down. Passengers like to use that moment to shift position moving weight around. I like to be ready for it.

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Dave39

The only time I stop with only the left foot down is on our driveway levee ramp that slopes to the right. Once I made the mistake of putting right foot down and almost dropped the bike.

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Jeron

What is the purpose of stopping with the right foot on the brake?

 

I always put both feet down. I usually balance for a few seconds before putting them down. In stop and go traffic I fight to keep my feet on the pegs as long as possible.

 

The only time this is trouble is when I am 2 up and my passenger moves as we come to a stop.

 

On extreme inclines I have tried using the rear brake to hold while pulling away but I find it easier to leave 1 finger on the front brake to hold the bike while I pull away.

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Danny S

One thing, it will keep your brake light on and make you more visible from behind.

 

Another, there might be a slight slope where you are stopped and it will keep your from rolling.... I guess holding the front brake would do the same thing, but using the rear gives you arm a rest.

Edited by Danny S

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Tourstart

Right foot on the rear brake and left foot on the ground. Keeping the bike in neutral until yellow light, or getting ready to take off.

 

Why?

If you keep the bike in gear and for whatever reason release the clutch you will might take off and drive into the vehicle in front of you and/or the engine will stop and you might fall over.

 

Try to push the bike on the luggage rack when you use the front brake only and afterwards the rear brake only. Then you will find that you are better protected by against being hit from the rear when using the rear brake only. Using the rear brake only keeps more stability in the bike, and when you are not in gear, you avoid problems if release the clutch unintentionally.

Edited by Tourstart

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notacop

On the pegs. I balance really well and haven't had a problem since I mounted the sidecar.

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aterry1067

Both feet down for me too. Front brake usually on, or if i'm sitting level I will apply it to activate the flashy brake light as a car approaches.

 

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Fubar
The way I was trained as a motorcop; left foot down, 1st gear, clutch in,foot on brake. Look ahead while checking mirrors.

I wasn't trained but that is the way I do it, too. Sometimes, after another vehicle stops behind me, I'll put my right foot down, as well (or if the light is an especially long one or I get a cramp but my right hand will be on the lever).

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