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Quirky brakes on my Suburban


Andrew Falanga

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Andrew Falanga

Hi everyone,

 

I have a 97 Suburban. The front brakes "bound." Normally to fix it I take the rotors and have them turned and it stops bounding. Within a few months, it starts again. I replaced the rotors completely and this fixed it for several months, but now it's bounding again. What could the issue be?

 

Andy

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I have an 05 Burb now and before that a 98. I believe these vehicles have just about the worst brakes you could imagine. My guess is the rotors are not of sufficient size to dissipate heat generated from braking and they warp. Love the thing just hate the brakes.

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Slotted rotors may help your problem. Also, using a cross pattern to tighten the wheels, and torquing them in stages.......but I would suspect the problem is heat, and slotted, premium rotors should eliminate it, at a considerable expense. Good Luck!

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Andrew Falanga

This does make sense. Thanks guys. It just didn't make sense that it would be calipers or faulty fluid. Heat dissipation makes the most sense. I wonder what slotted rotors cost?

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On my last jeep, the calipers would get stuck rubbing on the rotors if the brakes got too hot. The result would be warped roters. Replacing the brake pads fixed the problem; the new ones didn't expand as much when they get hot and stick. My symtom was the smell of overheated brakes coming out of the mountains.

 

 

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Are the rotors held on by the wheel and lugnuts? I had this problem with one of my old GM cars, using a torque wrench on the lugs cured it.

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Curing brake pulsations

 

 

The easy way:

Find a brake shop with an "on the car" lathe and having them resurface the rotors should cure the problem,assuming that the lugs are properly torqued.

 

The"on the car lathe" compensates for any runout in the rotor,which is usually the base cause of the problem.

 

When the rotor is not running true,the brake pads will rub on the same spot each revolution even thought they are not applied,causing a thin spot in the rotor.When braking the pads squeeze the rotor as it rotates and when they hit the thin spot they release slightly,only to grab as they come back into the thicker portion,which results in the Pulsation you feel.

 

The hard way:

 

Clean all rust and crud from the rotor mounting surfaces and torque on without the wheel.Using a dial indicator check the runout.Anything over .003,you will need to rotate the rotor one hole on the hub and start over until you get the right specs,if you can't get it right,got back to the easy way. :P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AXE is correct. Pre 2004 they bascially had car brakes while trying to stop 6100lbs + anything you haul. I bought a new 1999 3/4 ton GMC SLE Suburban with everything made. It ate disk pads about every 17k and would require a new set of rotor about every 45k. I got so use to changing the pads I could do them in 30 minutes or less. The organic pads will stop smoother, but still don't last very long. I have 2008 1/2 ton now that just turned 17k. So far so good...

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