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Flat Tire Repair Emergency


bohuntr

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I'm stuck in Houston with a flat. Went out to the bike this mornign and there it was, completely down.

Does anyone know:

1.) what type of tools I will need to get the wheel off the bike? That star thing is pretty exotic, last time I needed one I had to go to 7 different stores and make 6 returns trying to find the right size.

2.) do I need any kind of extension to get the star in there? A regular socket? Some type of pry bar? Where can I get these?

3.) Do I have to remove the exhaust to get to the wheel? I have no stand and nothing to put the bike on, so I have to put the bike on the mechanics stand then take the wheel off. Will the bike stand up?

I am kind of stuck here without transportation, and am working from 0600-2100 7 days a week. I might have to have the tools FEDEXed in, so if you know, please be specific about the tools so I can try to find them online. I don't really want to spend 5 times on shipping what the tools cost, but I'm really not in position to go looking.

Thanks,

 

John

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I don't think so. I would have to get access to an air pump or compressor and then the stuff to plug the hole. My bike is sitting in a parking lot now and I'm not sure how I could get a compressor out there to fill the tire.

I looked, but I couldn't find anything that made the hole, so I'm not sure what I would plug.

Thanks for the reply.

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You should be able to find most of your info on this site.

 

http://www.jimvonbaden.com

 

Simple answer is put the bike on the center stand, remove the rear section of exhaust, remove wheel bolts and it pops right off. Those funny star shaped bolts are Torx style bolts. I'm not sure of the sizes, because i'm not with my bike right now, but you will need a socket wrench, a metric socket for one of the exhaust bolts, and then two different size torx sockets. You don't need a lot of tools to remove the rear wheel.

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Go get a couple cans of fix-a-flat from from an auto parts store. Attach the fill tube from the can to the valve stem them push the button on the can. Your tire will inflate. While on the center stand, spin the tire and look to see if the fix-a-flat foam is coming out anywhere (remember to look at the valve stem too). If it's not coming out, then the foam (fix-a-flat) may have sealed a small hole. If you see it coming out, that is where you put the tire plug. You may have to use a pair of pliers or needle nose pliars to extract whatever punched the whole, before inserting the tire plug. Use the second can, if necessary to reinflate the tire. Find an air compressor, let all the gas out of the tire (fix-a-flat gas) then reinflate with air.

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Nate and Brian,

Thanks for the ideas. I think my first try will be to find some tools to get the tire off, then drop it off for repair or replacement. I was going to replace them next month on the 6K, but might as well do it now (5300).

I have a 200 mile ride to get home to Austin, and I've never used the fix a flat before. Is it ok for long rides? Will the tech's at the dealership be able to clean the stuff out when they replace the tire?

Thanks again,

John

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If you’re work 6AM to 9PM and it sounds like you are unfamiliar with mechanical things and have no tools and are concerned with using fix-a-flat then your options are limited. Call the local BMW dealer and have them pick it up and fix it. Longer term you really need to invest in a modest set of essential tools, a tire plugger and a small compressor (all available at any autoparts and probably a roadside assistance contract. At least you’re in town. Think about if you were on the highway in West Texas.

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John's got the right idea, get someone to fix it for you. If you want to get it back to Austin without fixing it, call Steve Shreeve, he operates a service in Austin, which includes towing, i.e. he'll come get it (and probably you). Steve might know of a mobile service in Houston similar to his Austin operation.

 

Link: http://tinyurl.com/b2jjt4

 

A small compressor that will run off your bike's battery is available at any auto parts store or WalMart type store for about $20; you can get tire pluggers at the auto parts stores...if you can find the hole, you can fix it yourself. I fixed a flat in New Mexico last year and rode another 2500 miles without issues. Slime brand pumps are complete kits, and the pump will fit under the seat in the tail section of your bike.

 

But JohnLT has the right idea.

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Think about if you were on the highway in West Texas.

Yes, if you ride a motorcycle the skills for self-reliant tire repair are second only to countersteering. It would definitely be a good idea to invest in a little training and tools for the next time.

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A small compressor that will run off your bike's battery is available at any auto parts store or WalMart type store for about $20..

 

Be aware that the CANBUS system may not support the current draw of many air compressors. The computer will shut off the power to that curcuit until the key is cycled off and on again. I wired my power port directly to the battery with a fused wire to prevent this from happening. You may have to run the compressor straight from the battery with some alligator clips or some such for now.

 

Jay

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Go to Harbor freight (2 in Houston--17490 HWY 290 or 10826 NORTH FREEWAY) and buy the following. You will be able to remove and replace your rear wheel, muffler, patch tires, remove fairings, etc. etc. and only spend $42.

 

91238-3VGA--$5.95 (torx)

ITEM 2838-3VGA--$9.95 (wrenches)

94586-4VGA--$7.99 (ratchet)

99797-1VGA--$5.99 (ratchet extension)

4077-1VGA--$7.99 (12 v compressor)

45183-0VGA-$3.99 (tire plugging kit)

 

Note: for the RT you'll need alligator clips to attach the compressor to the battery--under the seat.

 

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Thanks to everyone for the ideas.

 

300.00$ later... I went out and found the right torx set (wheel and exhaust), plus a set of metric wrenches to get the bolt on the exhaust off. Got a friends car and drove it to cycle gear and had them put a new tire on. My tire had 5 holes in it from somthing long and flat. I don't remember hitting anything in the road, but whatever it was, it was long. The holes were about 5" apart in a straight line down the center of the tire. Front tire was fine.

 

Now I know, keep a spare set of tools in Houston as well as Austin.

 

Once again, thanks for all the replies. I really thought I was going to be stuck here for a while.

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Thanks to everyone for the ideas.

 

300.00$ later... I went out and found the right torx set (wheel and exhaust), plus a set of metric wrenches to get the bolt on the exhaust off. Got a friends car and drove it to cycle gear and had them put a new tire on. My tire had 5 holes in it from somthing long and flat. I don't remember hitting anything in the road, but whatever it was, it was long. The holes were about 5" apart in a straight line down the center of the tire. Front tire was fine.

 

Now I know, keep a spare set of tools in Houston as well as Austin.

 

Once again, thanks for all the replies. I really thought I was going to be stuck here for a while.

 

 

Sounds like someone stabbed it with a knife... :eek:

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Hi,

 

Does anyone have detailed instructions on How to plug a tire? Illustrations would be nice. I've read about it, but never actually done one. How far do you push the plug in? How much of the rope is left sticking out of the hole? One or two ends? Etc. Thanks.

 

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Hi,

 

Does anyone have detailed instructions on How to plug a tire? Illustrations would be nice. I've read about it, but never actually done one. How far do you push the plug in? How much of the rope is left sticking out of the hole? One or two ends? Etc. Thanks.

 

http://www.jimvonbaden.com/page5.aspx

 

These repair kits can be found at any auto parts store,Walmart,even seen them at 7-11.

If you can,get the type marked for radial tires,but the regular type will do if you have an urgent need and no other

source.

 

 

JR356

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Dick_at_Lake_Tahoe_NV

Get a Dyna Plug kit, http://www.dynaplug.com/ And this very small slime pump, http://www.amazon.com/Slime-40001-Power-Sport-Inflator/dp/B000ET9SB4/ref=pd_sim_sg_5

and you're good to go.

 

You might want a pair of thin gloves and a micro-fiber towel to clean your hands. Be sure to put together a little tool kit you can carry on your bike. A torx Socket,and a couple of metric sockets and rachet-handle for the rear wheel, And some tools for the front. You can buy a big Metric bolt and a couple of Nuts you can put on it and lock together, to remove the front Wheel.

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My tire had 5 holes in it from somthing long and flat. I don't remember hitting anything in the road, but whatever it was, it was long. The holes were about 5" apart in a straight line down the center of the tire.

 

Wow, sounds like you hit a spike strip! You weren't being chased were you?

 

Good luck, we won't tell the LEOs where you are.

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stubblejumper

I carry a small air compressor and a small plug kit,and it came in handy last summer when my rear tire picked up a large screw 1500km from home.I removed the screw,inserted a plug with the kit,and inflated the tire with the compressor,and rode to the nearest dealer.The tire was replaced,and I was on my way in less than an hour.

http://www.gadgetjq.com/slime_pump.htm

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advise...

get a flat tier repair ... and some tools too

buy a compresor air an disarm an keep out all plastics and covers and you can see that the mechanism is too small ... is not more bigger than you hand.

get some pinch wood screws o pijas de punta para madera ... just in case that you have to pleace in to the hole and be in to the road in just a few minuts with out pleace tire out

 

in to your emergengy stuffs dont forget an instan glue crazy kola some bicarbonate o bicarbonato de sodio for make a mix btw instan glue an this for make a higer paste .. . and some tied rat or i dont know how to say it .. colas de rata or plastic straps for tie any thing...

 

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I appreciate all the advice. I had tools back home, but none here in Houston with me. Now I have tools in both places.

 

I have no idea what I hit. The pattern is very precise though, every 5-6 inches all along the center of the rear tire. They are about 3mm-4mm wide. I don't think it was vandalism, someone would have had to roll the bike and use a tape measure to make the cuts so precise.

 

There is always stuff on the streets of Houston, so no telling what caused it.

 

The bike is still under warranty, it only has 5K on it. I didn't know BMW roadside would take care of road hazards, that's why I didn't call them. I thought they were for "mechanical" breakdowns.

 

At least I really like the Pilot I put on!!

 

Thanks again,

 

John

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Sounds like you ran over a lath strip with nails sticking out.

 

I've plugged countless car tires, and a few motorcycle tires, with good success. The only time I've had issues is when I've had to do it in the freezing rain, with bad cement. The procedure I use is as follows:

 

1. Pull out object with pliers.

 

2. Ream hole thoroughly with the reamer.

 

3. Thread the plug through the insertion tool, and bend the plug back so it will insert easily.

 

4. Put a little rubber cement on the reamer, work it in for a second or two. This step could be omitted if you feel you can't do step five within a few seconds.

 

5. Immediately thoroughly coat the plug on the insertion tool with cement, insert it a third to half way, yank it out.

 

6. Trim the excess, but not all the way level with the tire.

 

7. Inflate.

 

8. Clean your tools, and buy a fresh tube of cement for the next time, since the stuff will dry on you after you open it.

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Sounds like you ran over a lath strip with nails sticking out.

 

I've plugged countless car tires, and a few motorcycle tires, with good success. The only time I've had issues is when I've had to do it in the freezing rain, with bad cement. The procedure I use is as follows:

 

1. Pull out object with pliers.

 

2. Ream hole thoroughly with the reamer.

 

3. Thread the plug through the insertion tool, and bend the plug back so it will insert easily.

 

4. Put a little rubber cement on the reamer, work it in for a second or two. This step could be omitted if you feel you can't do step five within a few seconds.

 

5. Immediately thoroughly coat the plug on the insertion tool with cement, insert it a third to half way, yank it out.

 

6. Trim the excess, but not all the way level with the tire.

 

7. Inflate.

 

8. Clean your tools, and buy a fresh tube of cement for the next time, since the stuff will dry on you after you open it.

 

That's a great list of the steps. When ever I change tires for a buddy, if he's never done it, I always have him practice plugging his old tire, before we remove it. I keep a couple extra WalMart plug kits and rubber cement tubes on hand.

 

BTW, I was taught to twist the handle on the insertion needle a couple turns, before yanking it out. It makes a nice little ball inside the tire that way.

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BTW, I was taught to twist the handle on the insertion needle a couple turns, before yanking it out. It makes a nice little ball inside the tire that way

The Nealey repair kit is designed to be used in that manner. Twist, pull back out, and cut, leaving 4 ends. It's what I carry with me. Another advantage of this kit is no tube of cement required.

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Nice n Easy Rider
BTW, I was taught to twist the handle on the insertion needle a couple turns, before yanking it out. It makes a nice little ball inside the tire that way

The Nealey repair kit is designed to be used in that manner. Twist, pull back out, and cut, leaving 4 ends. It's what I carry with me. Another advantage of this kit is no tube of cement required.

 

Which kit do you use? I assume you have had good experience(s) with it since you're mentioning it here.

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I would recommend a method such as the Dynaplug (which is what I use, and have had consistently good results with for many years) or Nealy that does not require reaming of the puncture. Reaming can cause more damage to the tire than did the original puncture and I've never seen the logic in further damaging a tire in order to repair it. Plus, as mentioned, the Nealy and Dynaplug kits do not require cement (which always seems to be a coagulated mess when you get around to using it.) One less potential problem is always good.

 

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The Mini kit.

 

(and yes, I've tested the results and am happy.)

I prefer over auto store string rope kits, Stop N Go, or DynaPlug. All of which I have used/tested.

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I appreciate all the advice. I had tools back home, but none here in Houston with me. Now I have tools in both places.

 

The idea is to keep the tools on you bike, where you may need them at any time.

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BTW, I was taught to twist the handle on the insertion needle a couple turns, before yanking it out. It makes a nice little ball inside the tire that way

The Nealey repair kit is designed to be used in that manner. Twist, pull back out, and cut, leaving 4 ends. It's what I carry with me. Another advantage of this kit is no tube of cement required.

 

I'm not familiar with this particular one, but most of the "no cement" plug kits I've seen are only good for temporary repairs.

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BTW, I was taught to twist the handle on the insertion needle a couple turns, before yanking it out. It makes a nice little ball inside the tire that way

The Nealey repair kit is designed to be used in that manner. Twist, pull back out, and cut, leaving 4 ends. It's what I carry with me. Another advantage of this kit is no tube of cement required.

 

I'm not familiar with this particular one, but most of the "no cement" plug kits I've seen are only good for temporary repairs.

Theoretically, that is all any plug is good for.

The Nealey ropes (as well as the "SafetySeal" ropes on cars & trucks) work as well as any cement rope system.

What "no cement" plug kits are you referring to?

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Dick_at_Lake_Tahoe_NV

And this is the differnce between the rope kits and the Nealey.

 

The secret to the Nealey Tire Repair Kit is the repair strand designed to last for years. The Nealey Tire Repair Kit repair strand is a cord consisting of uncured butyl and silicone rubber products that cure into the puncture, plugging the hole and forming a seal on both the inside and outside of the tire.

 

Is it worth the extra few $$ ($13.20 shipped)? When I get a flat, IT IS!

 

 

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I appreciate all the advice. I had tools back home, but none here in Houston with me. Now I have tools in both places.

 

The idea is to keep the tools on you bike, where you may need them at any time.

 

I gather that now... I already put together a tool & tire kit. Live and learn.

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And this is the differnce between the rope kits and the Nealey.

 

The secret to the Nealey Tire Repair Kit is the repair strand designed to last for years. The Nealey Tire Repair Kit repair strand is a cord consisting of uncured butyl and silicone rubber products that cure into the puncture, plugging the hole and forming a seal on both the inside and outside of the tire.

 

Is it worth the extra few $$ ($13.20 shipped)? When I get a flat, IT IS!

 

 

The Tee might just give that a shot. The weak link in cement-type plugs (which work great) is the cement, which seems to dry out at the most inopportune moments.

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What "no cement" plug kits are you referring to?

 

I'm not sure what plug kits Mister_Tee was refering to, but I was very scared to find my "Stop'n Go"

plug kit came with greased plugs. No cement, no claim to any adhering at all and to lubricate the thing

you really don't want to pop out. Amazing!

 

The Nealy plugs claim to adhere. Do you folks find that true?? I agree with the issues with cement.

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Nealeys have been no problem.

The only plugs that I have seen multiple complaints on are the StopnGos. Either being cut by the tire belts or otherwise popping out. How much of this is installer error, I don't have any idea. I personally have not experienced any leakage problems with StopnGo plugs, but I have only used them long enough to get me someplace I can get the tire changed.

I prefer Nealey.

 

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Nealeys have been no problem.

The only plugs that I have seen multiple complaints on are the StopnGos. Either being cut by the tire belts or otherwise popping out. How much of this is installer error, I don't have any idea. I personally have not experienced any leakage problems with StopnGo plugs, but I have only used them long enough to get me someplace I can get the tire changed.

I prefer Nealey.

 

Plus on the Nealey. I'm a big fan, used them on cars for years and I've repaired a number of flats on cars and bikes with them with zero problems and one try. I know a couple of guys that had to battle with the stop n go plugs to get a good seal. Someone on one of the boards (may have been this one) actually wrote up a HowTo with the stop n go. Seems unduly complicated.

 

Plus they are one of the few companies left that will send you your item COD. They will send you the kit and you can just drop a check in the mail to them AFTER you get the kit. Pretty neat in my book. Plus their product works great....

 

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