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New tires


bridwell52

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Got a new front tire yesterday and I am aware of the slick condition.

If I ride it going down the Interstate in a straight line I scrub in the middle contact patch, correct?

The first curve I come up to I take it easy and dont lean too hard and I get a little more scrub in on the side.

How do I scrub in the chicken strips without a slide out? You have got to get the bike leaned over on a new tire surface to scrub them.

 

David B

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The first curve I come up to I take it easy and dont lean too hard and I get a little more scrub in on the side.

How do I scrub in the chicken strips without a slide out?

David B

 

You live in FL right? You may never encounter that "first curve" :wave:.

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The first curve I come up to I take it easy and dont lean too hard and I get a little more scrub in on the side.

How do I scrub in the chicken strips without a slide out?

David B

 

You live in FL right? You may never encounter that "first curve" :wave:.

 

Hey, Interstate ramps can be fun. BTDT :grin:

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Joe Frickin' Friday

The idea is that you gradually work your way out to the chicken strips so that at any given time, your contact patch consists mostly of tread that has already been scuffed/scrubbed.

 

Similar to Andy, I typically get out to an empty parking lot and do slow-speed spirals in both directions. Instead of leaning to the inside of the turn, you lean as far as you can to the outside; this way, you can scrub the edges of the tread pretty well without asking the tire for a lot of lateral traction.

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Thanks guys, I hit the parking lot this morning and finished them off, this afternoon. We do have some curves around here but they probally would not count in SC, or TN.

What chicken strips?

 

David

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The first curve I come up to I take it easy and dont lean too hard and I get a little more scrub in on the side.

How do I scrub in the chicken strips without a slide out?

David B

 

You live in FL right? You may never encounter that "first curve" :wave:.

 

Years ago I'd respond.

But now I just chuckle and keep the secret.

I think I'll post some pictures this Spring, minus road identification, of some of our flat, straight roads.

Granted, they aren't in many parts of the state.

They aren't all over the place like the Appalachians and other areas, but there are some nice rides.

Please don't tell anyone though, we'd prefer to continue the present state of disinformation and not turn into another Deal's Gap.

:lurk:

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You live in FL right? You may never encounter that "first curve" :wave:.

 

That's funny. I remember flying in to the Orlando area many years ago and the airline pilot said over the intercom "those on the right side of the aircraft can now see Space Mountain, that's the second tallest mountain in Florida"

 

David,

 

You live in FLA. Use sandpaper or a belt sander... :rofl:

 

Steve in So Cal

 

After seeing Richard's (BeniciaRT_GT) K12Gt on it's side after a tire change....I used sand paper after my last new tire. No issues after that!

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Alright I'll take the bait, How do you "sand" a mc tire? how do you keep it even? what grit? does it work?? Two new tires for the 1150rt sitting in the garage waiting to be mounted.

kc

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I don't think it's the newness of the rubber that's the problem, it's bringing the tire's temperature up so the release agent, which helps remove the tire from the mold, is evaporated from new rubber.

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Alright I'll take the bait, How do you "sand" a mc tire? how do you keep it even? what grit? does it work?? Two new tires for the 1150rt sitting in the garage waiting to be mounted.

kc

 

Yes, it works. 200 grit or anything else for that matter. Simple Green on a Scotch brite pad works just as well.

 

Tires have a kind of waxy coating. This coating is slippery and could cause undesireable results if just left to luck. Most often I've just ridden kind of gingerly allowing the tires to heat up, and I increase the lean angles until the whole surface has been used.

 

As you ride on the center, this coating wears off quite safely, then as you lean, you start from an area where the wax has already been cleared and lean onto an area with wax but the process is gradual and the wax wears off easy.

 

Obviously if you go into a full lean demanding extreme traction from a cold waxed tire, guess what will happen...

 

Don't fret too much over it.

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I recently read an interview by one of the senior guys at Pirelli. He said that mold release compound is no longer used in the industry. I know at the track I throw on a new set of tires and I'm up to full speed by the end of the first lap.

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Polo,

Guess I'll give it a scrub with your suggested brew, then proceed gently. The tires are plain jane Metz 880 Marathon on '04 1150RT, not alot of racing going on so not a very sticky tire, just the occasional need for speed.

Thanks,

kc

 

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Polo,

Guess I'll give it a scrub with your suggested brew, then proceed gently. The tires are plain jane Metz 880 Marathon on '04 1150RT, not alot of racing going on so not a very sticky tire, just the occasional need for speed.

Thanks,

kc

 

Just take it easy, keep your eyes open and enjoy the pucker factor should a minor slip occur. It's all fun.

 

Best.

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