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Is this really impossible? Gallon whole milk?


waylap

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I followed the adventures of a 27-year old hiking the length of the Appalachian Trail last summer. By the time he reached New Hampshire, he was ingesting incredible amounts of food (and still left feeling hungry), so a gallon of milk is totally believable.

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I followed the adventures of a 27-year old hiking the length of the Appalachian Trail last summer. By the time he reached New Hampshire, he was ingesting incredible amounts of food (and still left feeling hungry), so a gallon of milk is totally believable.

 

At the halfway point on the AT, through hikers are traditionally required to eat a gallon of ice cream with a wooden spoon. Okay, maybe it's a half gallon; can't remember. They say that you burn the same amount of calories totting a backpack each day on the At that you would burn running a marathon. Result is that you need to eat max calories.

 

 

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This subject (drinking a gallon of milk in one hour) was discussed on the food network on Tuesday night... according to thier sciencetist the feat is impossible....without your body turning into a volcano and erupting violently...

 

The stomach can not expel enough of the milk through the intestines to keep up...See large hole going in (throat) little bitty hole going out to intestines....backup = upchuck....

 

 

 

 

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I know this is really going out on a limb here......BUT

 

A couple of the guys from Jackass tried to do this a few years ago and it ended poorly. It ended exactly as Bill said. They did fine for awhile, then their stomach got full due to their bodies not being able to process the milk.........Then we got to see the milk again. I think the only way possible would be to have a large enough stomach to hold all the liquid. Even then, I wouldn't be surprised to see the body reject it.

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Joe Frickin' Friday
This subject (drinking a gallon of milk in one hour) was discussed on the food network on Tuesday night... according to thier sciencetist the feat is impossible....without your body turning into a volcano and erupting violently...

 

The stomach can not expel enough of the milk through the intestines to keep up...See large hole going in (throat) little bitty hole going out to intestines....backup = upchuck....

 

What is it about milk that makes it uniquely unsuited to taking in a gallon of it in a short period of time?

 

Why would it be possible with, say, a gallon of hot dogs? In only ten minutes? (my assumption here is that 60 hot dogs, with water-soaked hot-dog buns, adds up to ~1 gallon of volume)

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This subject (drinking a gallon of milk in one hour) was discussed on the food network on Tuesday night... according to thier sciencetist the feat is impossible....without your body turning into a volcano and erupting violently...

 

The stomach can not expel enough of the milk through the intestines to keep up...See large hole going in (throat) little bitty hole going out to intestines....backup = upchuck....

 

What is it about milk that makes it uniquely unsuited to taking in a gallon of it in a short period of time?

 

Why would it be possible with, say, a gallon of hot dogs? In only ten minutes? (my assumption here is that 60 hot dogs, with water-soaked hot-dog buns, adds up to ~1 gallon of volume)

 

Wild guess. Perhaps it has something to do with the lactose? "Lactose intolerance" is a bit of a misnomer. Humans are, by nature, lactose intolerant. The "oddity" is lactose tolerance.

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What is it about milk that makes it uniquely unsuited to taking in a gallon of it in a short period of time?

 

First I have to say I always admire Joe's desire to know "why it works or why it happens" Do you ever watch "How it made?" on cable?

 

 

While I can not explain the physiological reaction to large volumes of milk....how about a parallel?

 

In very simple terms...Most wastewater treatment plants will also be bogged down by various types of input, and dairy is one of those types of challenging inputs. Dairy input to the biological system causes a high BOD, Biological Oxygen Demand. For instance normal input(influent) BOD to the plant is around 200 mg/l and output (effluent) is 20 mg/l. Dairy BOD can range from anywhere from 500 mg/l to 5000 mg/l. When input into a system in large quantities, high BOD causes low DO, dissolved oxygen...because the organisms in the treatment process cannot keep up with the high BOD the process is starved for DO and the organisms(which break down the influent) die. This is why you see a fish kill when the milk truck overturns near a creek.

 

A wastewater treatment facility is a $10 million dollar(+/- depending on input) version of the body...chemically and biologically separating solids from liquids over time.

 

It is my suspicion that this same overwhelming influence of milk occurs in the body causing a violent reaction.

 

The body can't wait for the old adage..."The solution to pollution is dilution" so it expels the milk instead.

 

just my .02 cents from my past experience building WWTF, not as a chemist...But I know for sure after building a few...

 

"Waste is a terrible thing to mind"

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Harry_Wilshusen

What is it about milk that makes it uniquely unsuited to taking in a gallon of it in a short period of time?

 

First I have to say I always admire Joe's desire to know "why it works or why it happens" Do you ever watch "How it made?" on cable?

 

 

While I can not explain the physiological reaction to large volumes of milk....how about a parallel?

 

In very simple terms...Most wastewater treatment plants will also be bogged down by various types of input, and dairy is one of those types of challenging inputs. Dairy input to the biological system causes a high BOD, Biological Oxygen Demand. For instance normal input(influent) BOD to the plant is around 200 mg/l and output (effluent) is 20 mg/l. Dairy BOD can range from anywhere from 500 mg/l to 5000 mg/l. When input into a system in large quantities, high BOD causes low DO, dissolved oxygen...because the organisms in the treatment process cannot keep up with the high BOD the process is starved for DO and the organisms(which break down the influent) die. This is why you see a fish kill when the milk truck overturns near a creek.

 

A wastewater treatment facility is a $10 million dollar(+/- depending on input) version of the body...chemically and biologically separating solids from liquids over time.

 

It is my suspicion that this same overwhelming influence of milk occurs in the body causing a violent reaction.

 

The body can't wait for the old adage..."The solution to pollution is dilution" so it expels the milk instead.

 

just my .02 cents from my past experience building WWTF, not as a chemist...But I know for sure after building a few...

 

"Waste is a terrible thing to mind"

 

I just knew this thread would end up in the gutter

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Would you think that it may have something to do with the stomach acid reacting with the milk? It may have the same effect as baking soda and vinegar.

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John Ranalletta

Sounds like a Jackass stunt.

 

Prepping for the last colososcopy, I had to drink a gallon of Propel with the prep solution. Short story: couldn't do it. I think a gallon of any liquid in that time frame is very difficult. Sounds like a story line the Travel Network would like, given the glutton series it's running. Who would watch that if they weren't tied to a chair with their eyelids sewn open?

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Well, for what it's worth, we know that anything with a high fat content slows down the motility of the stomach. That's why fatty foods "stick to your ribs" better than others.

 

So, it's an interesting question as to whether milk is unique. To really test it, I'd suggest starting with a gallon of water. If that stays down, try a gallon of skim milk. Succeeding there, move on to 1% and so on.

 

I decline to be involved in this study, but I'd be interested to read about it here!

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ShovelStrokeEd

I have consumed, in the long ago, 2 quarts of milk and an entire apple pie. Walked away with a distended belly and a distinctly disturbed feeling in my middle regions. This after a night of playing pool and drinking beer. I was 20 or so years old and weighed about 160 lbs. Didn't hurl.

 

I did watch my friend, now gone, Enormous Mother, consume an entire turkey washing it down with copious amounts of soda. Mother weighed 540 lbs at his summer weight though and was about 6'3". He had room for a piece of pie.

 

I cannot imagine a full gallon of milk. That stuff just doesn't go away.

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Maybe this would be well suited entertainment at the upcoming UN??

 

With a prize of some sort? There's Weeks State Hospital only 4 miles away!

 

:lurk:

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If they could make it taste like pizza, I think I could do it.

 

 

sO, tHAT would be a gallon of Pizza..??

 

I think I could eat the equivalent of a gallon of pizza, although I'm not sure. I wonder how many pies that would be? Kind of messy to find out empirically. We'd have to do a weight/volume thingy then work it out.

 

For the sake of those of you living in "pizza challenged" states, a "pie" is a large pizza.

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Unhofliche_Gesundheit

i think not lactose but rather casein is the culprit (Lactose is milk sugar. Casein is milk protein). very slow to digest.

 

 

 

"Casein can take up to 7 hours to digest fully. When ingested, casein clots in the stomach forming a thick cottage cheese consistency rather than remaining as a liquid."

 

casein currently in favour with bodybuilders for this reason ( "slow release of amino acids can cause a very favourable anti-catabolic state"

 

"Caseinate makes up about 80% of the protein of cow milk, whey comprising the other 20%"

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