Jump to content

Just thinkin'


PBee

Recommended Posts

Last August I purchased an ‘01 1100 RT paying top dollar for it. The bike had 47,000 miles on it, was spotless without even so much as a scratch or chip in the paint and the tires had about 95% tread. The only "add-ons" are heated grips and seats. Fortunately I also spent a few bucks for a protection plan that covered such items as engine and transmission. Within the first month the input shaft went out so the protection plan more than paid for itself right away. Since the transmission had to be pulled I had the clutch replaced figuring at 47,000 miles it would have to be replaced before much longer anyway. Not knowing the age of the battery I also had that replaced. Let's face it, with winter coming we all know this is the prime time for older batteries to leave you stranded and this 1100RT is now my primary transportation.

 

Again, because I have no idea when the previous owner last serviced this bike, I took it to the dealer for the 48,000 miles service, (it has close to 50,000 miles on it now and I'm not comfortable doing anything more than changing oil and filters). In addition to the "Level II Service" I had the brake pads replaced, PIAA driving lights installed and the headlight replaced with a PIAA H4. I'll never admit to anybody how much I paid for all this but will say this is now one smooth running machine with a beautiful throaty sound and with all the PIAA lights cagers can't help but see me and I'm able to see everything on the highway.

 

My investment so far is probably close to or more than what I would've paid for an 1150RT or maybe even a 1200RT without any improvements but feel I have the advantage of not having all the electronics of the newer bikes nor do I have the advantages/disadvantages of linked brakes. In addition the infamous input shaft problem has now been taken care of.

 

Considering everything I've done and considering my age, (almost 71), this baby should out last my riding career.

 

Yep, just thinkin'. :/

Link to comment

Just thinkin...it had better, considering what you have into it.

 

Just curious, why the adversion to "all the electronics", with the advantage of a lighter and more reliable system,ie. headlight failure warning for example... And the linked brake system, a proven advantage in emergency braking situations???

 

Its not often you find someone at 71 moving to a motorcycle as their "primary transportation". Congratulations!!

 

Jim

Link to comment

The truth of the matter is that not many around here will admit to what they have invested into their bikes, so don't feel bad. All that really matters is "are you happy with your bike" and if so then no worries.

Link to comment

I can guess what you paid.. and having done so myself.. I think it was worth it..

 

Additionally, I'm exactly half your age, and I hope mine lasts my riding career, as I'm so in love with my R1100RT..

 

Cheers!

-Ken

Link to comment
The truth of the matter is that not many around here will admit to what they have invested into their bikes, so don't feel bad...

 

I don't even know myself how much I have invested in my bike, and I am disinclined to try and add it all up. Let's not even mention riding gear, training classes, books and magazines. Whatever the total amount is, it's worth it! :)

 

Jay

Link to comment

Jim, I don't really have an aversion to electronics, I like "bells and whistles" as much as the next guy, it just seems the more put on the bike the greater the chance something is going to fail. When I spoke of linked brakes, and unless I'm mistaken, there was a time they were linked both ways but on the newer bikes the front brake is not activated when you're trying to use the rear brake only for low speed maneuvering.

 

Oh, and so far as using the bike is my primary transportation I feel that if I'm ever going to do it it it better be now because Lord knows how much longer I'll be healthy enough to enjoy it.

Link to comment

Welcome to the board and the asylum. For many of us motorcycling is more of an emotional thing than a rational one. I suppose that each of us could get out the receipt files and add it all up, and divide by the miles driven, and get some sort of rational mathematical answer.

 

Then you would have to divide by the Smile Markers passed and the add in the Grins, plus the Friends, the Rides, the Events, and so forth. But why try to measure all that?

 

Welcome on board. Enjoy.

 

 

Link to comment
The truth of the matter is that not many around here will admit to what they have invested into their bikes, so don't feel bad. All that really matters is "are you happy with your bike" and if so then no worries.

 

What I paid wasn't important enough to remember, or I'm getting real forgetful.

Link to comment
Unhofliche_Gesundheit

actually as someone who has kept record of all expenses - not just service and inusrance and plates but also the books, the riding class, tools, gear - you are better off if you don't know how much you spent! i have the gut feel of what spent - but the actual is actually 3 times higher. like going to costco... it all adds up!

 

if i use the sales tax as figure for depreciation - and don't factor in cost of capital then cost per km works out to 1$.

 

i asked around before i got into this.... "will this be really-really expensive?" "will i end up killing myself". "no-no" they said. well they were only half right- and i still have lots of time to kill myself....(trying not to obviously...)

 

better to regret things you did than things you did not.

Link to comment

When I go to work and watch my coworkers plan vacations that are as safe, comfortable, and predictable as their everyday lives I know my motorcycling passion has been worth every penny.

Link to comment

Everytime I get on the bike, it's a mini-vacation. I also try to camp instead of motelling when on trips (it's all part of the adventure of biking).

 

So, to me, it's a good ratio of quality to expense with the bike. I don't think I can have $800 a day worth of fun at a hotel in New York, but I do think I can have $500 a week on a motorcycle trip.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...