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Oil Change R1200RT


ViTaL

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Sorry to present another on this subject!

Hi, I'm sure that this subject has been aired out before, but I'd like to have some valued experiences. My last oil change for the season on my R1200RT (2007) was done with much care: I ran the engine to warm it, changed the filter and allowed the oil to drain for a long time, (no more drips!). Then I carefully measured and added 4 litres of the best, which is the quantity that my "Rider's Manual" calls for. Then I started and ran the engine for a long time, not riding, but revving it up and down. When I shut down and checked the level in the sight window ..... It is FULL! My questions: Is it "over filled"; is this normal; will it lead to any problems (assuming that it is "over filled")? Thanks

 

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Victor .... sounds like you added a bit too much oil. What you have to remember is when you drain it you never get out a FULL 4 qts. When I do the change I refill with about 3 1/2 qts. run it and then recheck it and top off if needed. Also, remember when you check it put the bike on the sidestand for about 5 min and then on centerstand. That should give you a good reading.

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What's the 5 min on sidestand do for the accurate reading?

 

On the oilheads it allows time & angle for the oil cooler to drain back into the sump.. Not sure on the Hexhead as my new Hexhead doesn’t seem to show much difference when placed on the side stand for 5 minutes (doesn’t hurt though to be sure)

 

Twisty

 

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What's the 5 min on sidestand do for the accurate reading?

 

On the oilheads it allows time & angle for the oil cooler to drain back into the sump.. Not sure on the Hexhead as my new Hexhead doesn’t seem to show much difference when placed on the side stand for 5 minutes (doesn’t hurt though to be sure)

 

Twisty

 

 

1+ What Twisty said

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Hi, Thanks for all your replies, some very good tips here. It occurs to me based on RTinNC's reply that the big difference could be in the use on "litre" and "quart" measurements. 1 litre is equal to 3.78 US Quarts, so if I put 4 litres into my bike it would be equivalent to 4.23 US quarts! And, I'm sure that the engine in my R1200RT is the same as in all R1200RT's in the US and Canada! What is different, I guess is the Rider's Manuals, mine, the Canadian version says 4 litres, the US version, I guess, says 4 quarts! Hence an overfill for me (or underfill for all US R1200RT's). Based on RTinNC's suggestion, I will henceforth add 3.5 litres and then check for fill!

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The 2008 R1200RT manual says 1.1 gallon or 4 litre, with oil filter change.

 

Are Canadian oil cans 1 litre or 1 Quart?

Anyways if you put in 4 litres you are exactly at factory specs.

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My procedure is pretty anal. :/

Engine cold or warm, same oil comes out. Cold is relative.

1; Drain oil, pull filter.

1a; Make sure filter gasket came off with said filter.

2; Install new filter, replace drain plug.

3; Dump in 4L of new oil.

4; Start engine, check for leaks for 30-60 seconds.

5; If no leaks, ride the snot out of it. :thumbsup:

 

My point is, no matter how many times you drain the oil, the same amount always goes back in. Also, running the engine "for a long time, not riding, but revving it up and down", is never a good idea. You're risking over-heating in a big way.

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The '07 Canadian version of the Manual only mentions the 4 litre measure.

You can find both here, some are 1 litre and others are 946ml (1 US quart)

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"1a; Make sure filter gasket came off with said filter."

 

Make sure you verify the above procedure. I just worked on friend's bike and the filter gasket stuck to the bottom of the engine. 5 years ago I came close to catastrophic engine failure due to this very situation. Until this happened to me I had never seen a filter gasket separate from the filter like that and I have done a lot of oil changes. I guess I was lucky.

 

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i usually apply a thin film of fresh oil on the new gasket when re-installing - it seems to work well in preventing being stuck upon next removal.

 

Definately check for gasket - car or bike

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I have always put a film of oil on the gasket of any filter I have installed and have never had one stick in 50 years.

 

I love Danny's "ride the snot out of it" comment. That is what these engines like. Coddle them and you have more problems.

 

Gael

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Unhofliche_Gesundheit

first time i changed the oil on the RT i had the filter gasket stay 'on the bike'. as is recessed you really dont see it.

i was lucky and glad i caught it ! i've been changing oil since before the invention of the internal combustion engine (arr back in my day it was all 'external ' ararrr) and that is the first time it happened to me!

 

also where is the snot? how do you know when it is out? does it need to be refreshed? is this something we have to change? synthetic or dino? please advise.

 

:grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin:

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Harry_Wilshusen

 

also where is the snot? how do you know when it is out? does it need to be refreshed? is this something we have to change? synthetic or dino? please advise.

 

:grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin:

 

Is there a snot sightglass or is it an old school snot dip stick.

 

Harry

 

 

 

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also where is the snot? how do you know when it is out? does it need to be refreshed? is this something we have to change? synthetic or dino? please advise.

 

:grin::grin::grin::grin::grin::grin:

 

Is there a snot sightglass or is it an old school snot dip stick.

 

Harry

 

 

 

Snot is the stuff that makes oil...well...oil. When the snot is out, it's time to change the oil. This usually occurs in the range of 3-7k miles, depending on whether it's syn or dino, & your riding style.

 

Oilheads & newer have a snot sight glass, while the older boxers have a snot dipstick.

 

Thanks for asking guys, I'm always glad to clear things up. lol8.gif

 

PS, FD snot is a totally different animal, & must be approached with caution. :/

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"1a; Make sure filter gasket came off with said filter."

 

Make sure you verify the above procedure. I just worked on friend's bike and the filter gasket stuck to the bottom of the engine. 5 years ago I came close to catastrophic engine failure due to this very situation. Until this happened to me I had never seen a filter gasket separate from the filter like that and I have done a lot of oil changes. I guess I was lucky.

 

I can't even begin to count the number of times I've changed oil filters. I was taught to always check the filter gasket but never had one stick...until 2 days ago when I did my first R1200RT oil change. The rubber seal from the OEM BMW filter stuck to the case. Good thing I checked.

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