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Warning: Newbie here with newbie questions


pmottaz

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I apologize ahead of time if this is a rehash but I wasn't able to ask the right questions to get the results I desired in the search dept.

 

I am going to get back on a bike after a couple of decades -prior experience being mainly dirt (raced motocross in my younger days) and a number of years (long ago) commuting on a Honda CX500.

 

I believe I've narrowed my choice down to getting a used R1150RT (going to use it for commuting (primarily) and weekend rides around No.Cal).

 

What I haven't been able to obtain is, information about what common problems (if any) that I should be aware of when looking at used models? I ran across a post on one google search about problem bearings in the drive train? That is about all I found.

 

Also were there any model years that were better (handling, performance, reliability, etc.)?

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Pete

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See: http://bmwsporttouring.com/faq.html

Good reading for us "noobs".

 

Pay for an hour of labor and have the bike checked out at a dealership. Sounds like we come from the same sort of background, i.e. I had a smaller Honda in college for commuting, and a 600cc one for play when I was in the Navy. Then I got married, had kids, and all that "play" stuff ended for about 20 years. Returned to dirt riding about 10 years ago, and that dropped off the last couple of years.

 

I picked up my RT-P as a "street re-entry" bike, since I wanted something larger when I had the 600cc, and I thought the black and white colors might keep me alive a bit longer while I was getting my feet wet again (e.g. visibility = life). Also, the cafe-racer style didn't fit me, and neither did the cruiser style bikes. The RT worked out OK, generally.

 

I had some decent mechanical experience, having rebuilt and restored several older dirt bikes. (Hey, they were older, but so was I, and they were still "new" to me, i.e. monoshock, etc.. I had fun working on them).

 

All that said, the BMW RT was another animal altogether. I didn't know what I didn't know, and that was scary. Pulling off the plastic the first time was akin to pulling apart a space ship. EVERYTHING on that bike scared me, from the brake system to clutch, to the weird boxy engine, and of course, all the electronics.

 

This forum helped educate me immensely, and in fact, it was what got me past my uncertainty. But you will pay $1,000's for this bike, and if you pick wrong, $1,000's more. I kind of knew what I was getting when I bought mine. I paid about 20% below market for my bike, but then I ended up restoring it to the point that (except for the exterior - it looks like a work bike, not a pretty toy) just about everything mechanical should last another 50K miles. Transmission, clutch, most bearings, new shocks, new cables, and so forth. I had a budget, so I was OK with the cost. However, if you spend $10K on yours, and then have to do something major like a transmission or clutch, your wallet might start hurting.

 

There's no doubt about it. While BMW's are a high quality machine, they require more maintenance than many Asian bikes, and definitely more than a car (particularly tires, which seem to last about 15-20% as long as a car tire).

 

I'd have a pro check out anything you buy, just so you know what you're getting into. We can tell you that the HES ought to be rewired, that the final drive splines fail what some feel is too high percentage of RT's (I probably would skip a bike that has had spline repair work), we could tell you all about surging. But that won't help you make an informed decision about a bike with hidden flaws.

 

Good luck with your purchase. I think I'm about done with my "starter bike", the R1100RT-P, and it's still a sweet ride. But I'm moving on to a "new" (all my bikes are used) 2005/6 R1200RT sometime this winter. Any good R1100RT or RT-P is fine. If you can find one at your price, the 2004 R1150RT may be the best Sport Tourer BMW ever made. The R1200RT is still kind of a new animal (2005-2009), but the R1100/1150 platform bikes were around for 96 to 2004, i.e. BMW worked out most of the "bugs" by 2004.

 

Regards,

 

Scott

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Your responses may be too broad ranging to do you much good because you will get into year, mileage, and maintenance issues. It may be more productive for you to find a particular bike and bring that bike too the board for input. The big picture is the RT is an excellent bike.

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Remember to bring a note from your wife saying that you have permission to buy a motorcycle or the dealer won't be allowed to sell you one.

 

This is a big, heavy cow compared to what you've had. Expect to lose your balance and have it fall over at least once; usually at a stop sign on a crowned road, backing it downhill, getting on or off in a parking lot. Crashbars take some of the fear out of it. An RT-P is an exellant choice, but you lose a passenger seat and they may have been ridden hard and have wiring issues from being converted to civilian use.

 

Last thing, keep about $2k in your bike fund so if it does break, you won't have to agonize about it. Just consider the repair to be an extra payment for getting to ride a really nice machine.

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IMHO the 04 1150RT is a sweet spot as it has the dual spark heads. This helps surging issues. Also I feel it is better to buy a higher mileage bike that has been ridden regularly and maintained properly than one that was ridden for, say 7,000 miles the first year and then let sit.

 

+1 to have your dealer go over the bike. I have bought two bikes sight unseen and I had the owner take it by the dealership for a "pre-purchase" inspection. The results were sent to me. They have a special form for this that goes over 60 or 70 items.

It was well worth the cost. I did not buy one of them, one that was weeping oil between the engine and transmission. I would have spent a LOT of money repairing that!

 

The 1150rt is a great bike, the 1200rt is better but more expensive. If you plan to drive 3k miles per year get the 1150, 10k get the 1200.

 

Gael

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To the best of my knowledge there is no motorcycle available in the market, in the category you are a candidate for, that does not have "issues", history of problems or deficiencies in design or appointment.

 

If you put all the brands and models into the mix and evaluate the fun factor, the reliability, the support system, and the culture... BMW wins for me.

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I own a 2003 R1150RT with 45000 miles and not a single problem while my good riding buddy has had major problems on his 2002 R1150RT even leaving him stranded last year while we were touring in Oregon with input shaft clutch spline failure. The only good thing to come out of the experience was that he detected the problem while we were about 25 miles away from a BMW SportTouring rally and so got to know the wonderful people of this group who quickly diagnosed the problem. As soon we pulled in to the rally and stated the noise, it was asked if it was a 2002 model with about 30,000 miles on it, which it was. It is a well known problem with this year and you will see many discussions on it in the oilhead tech forum. I love my bike, it is rock solid under any driving conditions, lighter than it looks so fine in urban traffic, and with it's fairing, luggage capacity and seating position a fantastic tourer. Just stay away from the 2002 model year.

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See: http://bmwsporttouring.com/faq.html

Good reading for us "noobs".

 

Pay for an hour of labor and have the bike checked out at a dealership...Returned to dirt riding about 10 years ago, and that dropped off the last couple of years.

 

This forum helped educate me immensely, and in fact, it was what got me past my uncertainty. But you will pay $1,000's for this bike, and if you pick wrong, $1,000's more.

 

There's no doubt about it. While BMW's are a high quality machine, they require more maintenance than many Asian bikes, and definitely more than a car (particularly tires, which seem to last about 15-20% as long as a car tire).

 

I'd have a pro check out anything you buy, just so you know what you're getting into. We can tell you that the HES ought to be rewired, that the final drive splines fail what some feel is too high percentage of RT's (I probably would skip a bike that has had spline repair work), we could tell you all about surging. But that won't help you make an informed decision about a bike with hidden flaws.

 

Regards,

 

Scott

 

Thanks Scott, I apprecite your comments and I don't know how I missed the faq - it was very helpful.

 

You're right we took similar life paths. Though I've been actively involved with the SCCA and BMWCCA Autocrossing Bimmers and road racing a 125cc shifter kart. I've concluded I don't have the b*&&s to race bikes(dirt or pavement) - too old. :/

 

I already planned on getting a pre-purchase inspection. There's a new BMW dealer close by that I'll be using. But I wanted to get a general idea of some of the most common problems so I can do a little prescreening. Like you, I have some decent mechanical skills that I'd prefer not to have to use right away. :)

 

Quick question, do RT-P's have different components? I.e. are they epuipped with more heavy duty components? There have been several for sale up here in NorCal on craigslist.

 

Pete

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Remember to bring a note from your wife saying that you have permission to buy a motorcycle or the dealer won't be allowed to sell you one...

 

...Last thing, keep about $2k in your bike fund so if it does break, you won't have to agonize about it. Just consider the repair to be an extra payment for getting to ride a really nice machine.

 

Thanks for the suggestions Quinn. Fortunately I've had AAAIDs (Autocross/automotive/aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome) :grin:

so I'm free to make any dumb decision I desire with no one but me to nag me about it!

 

Pete

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Have a 02 1150RTP with 66k miles which I put 16k myself, only thing I changed is front brake rotors bike rides like a champ, dealer says I should be good for 100k

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IMHO the 04 1150RT is a sweet spot as it has the dual spark heads. This helps surging issues. Also I feel it is better to buy a higher mileage bike that has been ridden regularly and maintained properly than one that was ridden for, say 7,000 miles the first year and then let sit.

 

The 1150rt is a great bike, the 1200rt is better but more expensive. If you plan to drive 3k miles per year get the 1150, 10k get the 1200.

 

Gael

 

Thanks for the info Gael.

 

That brings up another question...what is considered too high a mileage for an RT?

 

E.g. I have had numerous E30 and E36 Bimmers over the years and know that for the most part 100-150k miles is not a big deal for these models. There are obviously things that need to be checked but if they've had decent care, high mileage isn't necessarily an issue.

 

Pete

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Quick question, do RT-P's have different components? I.e. are they epuipped with more heavy duty components? There have been several for sale up here in NorCal on craigslist.

 

Pete

 

From what I have seen about them, the RTP's have a slighly higher capacity alternator, dual batteries, larger side stand, and thermostatically activated cooling fans for the oil cooler, none of which is on the non-P models.

 

In case it is within the realm of consideration, I have the 06 R1200RT and have been very happy, it has just over 21,000 Km's on it and just routine maintenance so far, would recommend it enthuisiastically.

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I own a 2003 R1150RT with 45000 miles and not a single problem while my good riding buddy has had major problems on his 2002 R1150RT even leaving him stranded last year while we were touring in Oregon with input shaft clutch spline failure. The only good thing to come out of the experience was that he detected the problem while we were about 25 miles away from a BMW SportTouring rally and so got to know the wonderful people of this group who quickly diagnosed the problem. As soon we pulled in to the rally and stated the noise, it was asked if it was a 2002 model with about 30,000 miles on it, which it was. It is a well known problem with this year and you will see many discussions on it in the oilhead tech forum. I love my bike, it is rock solid under any driving conditions, lighter than it looks so fine in urban traffic, and with it's fairing, luggage capacity and seating position a fantastic tourer. Just stay away from the 2002 model year.

 

Dousta,

Thanks, your comments are very helpful - that is the kind of info I'm looking for.

 

Pete

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From what I have seen about them, the RTP's have a slighly higher capacity alternator, dual batteries, larger side stand, and thermostatically activated cooling fans for the oil cooler, none of which is on the non-P models.

 

In case it is within the realm of consideration, I have the 06 R1200RT and have been very happy, it has just over 21,000 Km's on it and just routine maintenance so far, would recommend it enthuisiastically.

 

Thanks Frank,

I've got a budget of about $8k. I've also been told to hold back about $1500 for suit/helmet/boots etc. So that leaves $6.5K for the bike.

 

Pete

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You ask what to look out for... for me the main thing you should consider is the brand... we have settled that I think.

 

Next the model... you are on a good track there too.

 

Next the individual bike... Here, the deal for me is the history. If you have reasonable assurance that the maintenance has been done, and there is documentation... and the inspection reveals nothing alarming, then mileage in the 30-50k range is not an issue.

 

Frankly however, the budget number you mention will press you into a zone where you need to be really careful. Not to the level of impossibility, but just careful. Many examples of the type and age bike you are looking at will be going for somewhat more then the figure you mentioned. So... if you find one that is in that range you want to understand why.

 

Obviously a thorough survey of the market will help... ebay, Craig's list and Cycle Trader etc will yield a feel for the market. This will alert you to "outliers" from the trend.

 

There are exceptions to the rule... one of the best buys I ever made was a BMW under a tarpaulin in a guys back yard. Abandoned, neglected, and sad to see. Close inspection revealed that the small rubber parts were ok... no cracks or missing parts. All the fluids were up to the right level. Not fresh but present. No suspicious leaks in the motor area. No sign of rust in the gas tank. A deal was struck for a ridiculous price and just a few weeks later it was back in reliable and fun service.

 

You are on a good path grasshopper....

 

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FYI, Cari (owner of Marin BMW) is the guy that founded this forum.

 

I've been very pleased with my 1100RTP. 1150's have a 6th gear, a different Motronic (fuel-management system), built-in fog lights, dual-sparkplugs, and in some cases linked and/or power-assisted brakes.

 

1100RTP vs. Civilian - The final drive gearing is a little different, so a tad more "sport", but a lower max speed.

 

I've heard that using an RTP model in California is quite handy when lane-splitting.

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See: http://bmwsporttouring.com/faq.html

Good reading for us "noobs".

 

Pay for an hour of labor and have the bike checked out at a dealership...Returned to dirt riding about 10 years ago, and that dropped off the last couple of years.

 

This forum helped educate me immensely, and in fact, it was what got me past my uncertainty. But you will pay $1,000's for this bike, and if you pick wrong, $1,000's more.

 

There's no doubt about it. While BMW's are a high quality machine, they require more maintenance than many Asian bikes, and definitely more than a car (particularly tires, which seem to last about 15-20% as long as a car tire).

 

I'd have a pro check out anything you buy, just so you know what you're getting into. We can tell you that the HES ought to be rewired, that the final drive splines fail what some feel is too high percentage of RT's (I probably would skip a bike that has had spline repair work), we could tell you all about surging. But that won't help you make an informed decision about a bike with hidden flaws.

 

Regards,

 

Scott

 

Quick question, do RT-P's have different components? I.e. are they epuipped with more heavy duty components? There have been several for sale up here in NorCal on craigslist.

 

Pete

 

Pretty much what was said. The RTP's have some nice features that the RT's don't have, but the only reason's I'd buy one again would be for (1) visability, (2) price, (3) single seat versus double-up, (4) city cases (you can buy used full sized ones, though), (5) crash bars (for the noob RT rides). RT's have a higher center of gravity than most other bikes, which makes maneuvering at low speed a balancing-challenge for even an experienced rider (hence the frequency of low-speed or stationary tip-overs in the first noob-30 days of ownership).

 

The RT-P's come with a "tall" BMW windscreen (I still replaced mine with a Cee-Baileys), an adjustable, wider, thicker "comfort seat" that's definitely better than stock (but not as nice as a custom seat), and a few other extras on the mechanical side. I think it's the ideal bike for returning to riding. There's an outfit on Ebay on Hollywood Motors which offers ex-chp bikes' regularly. Their feed back seems ok, and I've chatting with them previously - seemed OK.

 

If you get an older bike (> 3 years) regardless of mileage, it's going to need more work because rubber things deteriorate. If it's be out in the sun rather than garaged - same thing. If it's got higher mileage (say, over 40K miles), you're going to spend more money on it. If you buy it from a dealer, it'll be in a lot better shape than from public auction, because BMW "culls" the good bikes from the trashed RT-P's, and blows the the crap ones out at dealer auction. I've heard that CHP bikes are generally in better shape because of the freeway-speed life of that kind of bike, better skills, and the likely hood one officer rode it most of it's LEO life, where as city bikes have multiple riders, frequently less experienced (or at least less experienced on a BMW), making short starts and stops in city traffic, and getting up over 45MPH infrequently. However, a Dealer will want $1,000 to $1,800 for their "higher quality" RT-P's. For $4,000 to $5,000, you can find yourself a pretty sweet 2000-2004 RT, plus some cash in the piggy bank for farkles and repairs.

 

Good Luck. .. Scott

 

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Thank you all for your help. I have a much better idea of what to look for now. I'm not in a big hurry so I'm willing to wait for the right bike to surface.

 

Btw, Woodie, I chuckled over your comment on the RT-P - lane splitting. But now that I think about it - it's a great idea.

 

Pete

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Pete, just thinking -- if you are not in a hurry, I would consider highly a 1200 with some miles on it. I have an '07 model with 10k on the clock and rented an '06 with 45k on the clock in Denver about a month ago. Did 2,400 miles on it and, I swear, it was as tight and new feeling as mine. A 1200 with a lot of miles may cost only slightly more than a pristine very low mileage 1150. I suspect negotiated final prices will come down some as people need money during the recession. Don't forget the three "D's" of getting a good deal; Death, Debt and Divorce.

 

Gael

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I had a 2000 1100RTP... my first BMW. I really miss that bike for commuting. The "go fast" black-and-white color scheme really does make a difference when lane splitting. When the 405 was stopped dead, the RTP carved through cars like the parting of the Red Sea. Especially helpful was the fact that the RTPs had a headlight off switch, so a couple of on/off flashes of the headlight helped to heighten the effect.

 

The down side comes when everything on the freeway is moving smoothly. More than a few times, the driver in front of me caught a glimpse of my RTP approaching in the mirror and slammed on the brakes. Should have pulled them over!

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I have a 2001 RTP that I bought on Craigslist this spring for $4,400 and it needs nothing. After cleaning it up, and cleaning off the adhesive residue from the various police stickers it looks almost new asides from maybe two scratches. I think it needs rear brake pads soon but they are not making noise yet.

 

I love this bike. It had 60k miles on it and I bet it is good for at least 60k more. Prices might be coming down some more on bikes with the current economy.

 

I also was away from motorcycles for more than a dozen years doing the family thing. And yes, I dropped the bike backing into the work parking lot space an hour after I picked it up. I also learned, don't back into a space in gear holding the clutch, bad idea....

 

But, even though it went down hard there was no damage. And I have put thousands of miles on it since and that has been my only incident. I got close a couple of other times though. Unless going at least 5mph that bike is just so hard to move around. But, I have gotten used to it and just stay diligent every time I am on it. It has wonderful acceleration, fantastic handling, strong brakes.

 

And yes, I would not trade the black and white scheme for anything. I love the respect I get from other motorists. The "parting of the red sea" effect on the freeway is a great feeling.

 

Mine was a city bike. CHP might be better but they were all quite a bit higher priced and higher miles at the time I was shopping.

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Please do not wait until "they make noise".

Easy enough to visually inspect.

Pads are cheaper than rotors.

Best wishes.

 

I checked again this afternoon. They are getting pretty thin. I ordered a new set of EBC pads that should be here by the weekend. Thanks.

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great topic. I'm also just returning to bikes after many years. I'm getting my 01 1150rt in a few hour. it has about 70k miles but 1 owner who has bought a new 1200 so I figure he has had a good run with it. I'm a bit nervous about possible problems so I will be using this forum a whole lot I suspect!

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Ooooo, goody! I like the taste of nOObs!

 

Pete,

 

It sounds like you are around the Livermore area (new dealer) so a tech day to teach you how to do your own maint. probably won't be far away. This place is what caused me to get an RT. Incredible technical support here for these bikes. Be careful though, next thing you know you'll be riding the thing all over the country just to hang out with these folks!

 

One important thing I didn't see (not that it wasn't said, I just didn't see it) was the brakes have one big difference on the RT vs. RTP:

 

The brakes on the 1150s are linked both front to back and back to front. However, on the RTP it is a partially linked system. The back doesn't affect the front, but the front still runs the back.

 

If you do decide on one of these, just make sure it will be the right bike for the kind of ridng you plan on doing. Although I called my RT "Tippy" since I dropped it the day after I bought it and again a few weeks later, I then got to where I use it for everything; literally. However, without a lot of seat time they really aren't comfortable city bikes. They are pretty top heavy and unwieldy at low speeds.

 

Best of luck whatever you decide! Also keep in mind, we really don't care what you ride, stick around for the fun folks!

 

 

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Ooooo, goody! I like the taste of nOObs!

 

Pete,

 

It sounds like you are around the Livermore area (new dealer) so a tech day to teach you how to do your own maint. probably won't be far away.

 

 

I could use one of those tech days. I am in the same general area. Why do you say a tech day is probably not far away? Is something planned?

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There are several folks around here that host them. It seems that there are several a year in the Bay Area...

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CoarsegoldKid

The brakes on the 1150s are linked both front to back and back to front. However, on the RTP it is a partially linked system. The back doesn't affect the front, but the front still runs the back.

 

 

The 1200RT's are like the RTPs. Hand brake = front and rear. Foot brake = rear only.

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The brakes on the 1150s are linked both front to back and back to front. However, on the RTP it is a partially linked system. The back doesn't affect the front, but the front still runs the back.

 

 

The 1200RT's are like the RTPs. Hand brake = front and rear. Foot brake = rear only.

 

when I took the MSF ARC it just so happened that all attendees were BMWs. All had R1150xx even if they didn't bring them. They all complained that BMW did the brakes "right" on the RTP but not the other models. Kinda glad I bought the RTP.

 

I am wondering if the barkes still linked in residual brake mode?

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I am wondering if the barkes still linked in residual brake mode?

 

No, the controls only operate their own brakes - i.e. no linking at all.

 

Andy

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  • 1 month later...
Ooooo, goody! I like the taste of nOObs!

 

Pete,

 

It sounds like you are around the Livermore area (new dealer) so a tech day to teach you how to do your own maint. probably won't be far away. This place is what caused me to get an RT. Incredible technical support here for these bikes. Be careful though, next thing you know you'll be riding the thing all over the country just to hang out with these folks!

 

One important thing I didn't see (not that it wasn't said, I just didn't see it) was the brakes have one big difference on the RT vs. RTP:

 

The brakes on the 1150s are linked both front to back and back to front. However, on the RTP it is a partially linked system. The back doesn't affect the front, but the front still runs the back.

 

If you do decide on one of these, just make sure it will be the right bike for the kind of ridng you plan on doing. Although I called my RT "Tippy" since I dropped it the day after I bought it and again a few weeks later, I then got to where I use it for everything; literally. However, without a lot of seat time they really aren't comfortable city bikes. They are pretty top heavy and unwieldy at low speeds.

 

Best of luck whatever you decide! Also keep in mind, we really don't care what you ride, stick around for the fun folks!

 

 

Well after keeping an eye on the bay area motorcycle want ads, I found an '03 'rt with 80K miles. It was in great shape - previous owner had just bought a new 1200rt and needed to sell it to make room for the new bike. Got a great deal on it and have been commuting with it for a couple weeks now. I'm really enjoying the bike.

 

Took it on a ride to Monterey and back via Hiway 1 and Half Moon Bay last weekend. Just loved it. Did find out that I'll have to do something about the seat. The previous owner (who is shorter and weighs less than I) removed some of the foam to sit lower. My big bum was a tad sore at the end of the ride and I kept sliding forward into the tank. It's been a while since I've ridden on the street, but I'm being real conservative and wary - so far so good. But it's a challenge to keep the thing under 80, she just purrs along so smoothly.

 

BeniciaRT_GT, where are those tech sessions you mentioned advertised?

 

Also, are there any local (to SF Bay Area) groups of beemer riders that get together for rides and such? Would be nice to do some rides with some more experienced folk. Haven't really done much in the way of touring but would like to now that I see what a nice bike it is (after I do something about the seat that is).

 

Anyway, thanks all for the advice and I look forward to further conversations on this forum.

 

Pete

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Pmottaz, congrats on the RT bike.

I am also from the Bay Area, and I got a R1100RT an year ago and also enjoying it a lot. Let me know if you are interested in doing some riding.

 

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Congrats.

The sliding forward is fixable by seat jacking w/shims and other cures.

But, w/out pics, this thread is ustusless... :lurk:

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Dave in Doodah

Pete - congrats on the bike. I just picked up an '03 RT last August. We are both Noob's and can learn this stuff at the same time. Drop me a note anytime you have questions. I've put about 3K miles on it so far and have picked up a few basics. Looking forward to doing 6K service in the spring or summer. This group of folks is top-notch.

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Silver Surfer/AKAButters

Congrats on the new ride! I loved my 02 RT once I took care of the initial surging problem it had. These bikes have real personality, are built like a tank, and are very capable in both the sport and touring categories. The best looking, IMO, as well.

 

BTW-Russell day long could be ridden all day in comfort.

 

 

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Dave in Doodah

I was gonna recommend that, too - look at an aftermarket seat. Mine already had one - i think it's a Russell, too.

 

Also, are you aware there are three seight height positions available - maybe you can at least move your low stock seat up to the highest position to get some short-term relief (if you haven't done that already).

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Congrats.

The sliding forward is fixable by seat jacking w/shims and other cures.

But, w/out pics, this thread is ustusless... :lurk:

 

I read about modifying the mount points, and I will be trying that first. There were three suggested aftermarket seats recommended in other threads: Cee Baileys, Russell (day-long) and Corbin. They are all in the same neighborhood price wise which makes it a little difficult to choose one over the other.

 

I actually tried to put in a picture but wasn't able to get it to work - wouldn't let me upload from my computer - it wanted a url to link too. I don't use a photo storage site (no real need)so...you'll have to use your imagination! :/

 

Thanks,

Pete

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Dave in Doodah

I have a Corbin Canyon on my older airhead RT, and I love it. But I do not put the mega-miles on it like many of the guys on this sight do. I have seen many postings that the Corbins are firmer than what many prefer.

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Pmottaz, congrats on the RT bike.

I am also from the Bay Area, and I got a R1100RT an year ago and also enjoying it a lot. Let me know if you are interested in doing some riding.

 

Were pretty close to another, I live in San Ramon. I'm game for doing some rides. I am hoping there is a group around here locally to get involved with. I joined the national BMW MOA and there is a Nor-cal chapter. Looks like their rides are fun but end up in campgrounds. I've done lot's of camping in my lifetime and have come to the conclusion that I enjoy a bed more than a sleeping bag (never thought I'd say that...used to tease my dad 'cuz he hated to camp, I understand where he was coming from now! ;) ) anyway you have to go to 2 meetings in order to join and it looks like the meetings are also rides/campouts. I dunno, we'll see. The first one is way down Hiway 1 past Big Sur. Don't think I can do that far of a trip till I fix the seat.

 

I'll post if I find something else.

 

Pete

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Pmottaz, congrats on the RT bike.

I am also from the Bay Area, and I got a R1100RT an year ago and also enjoying it a lot. Let me know if you are interested in doing some riding.

 

Were pretty close to another, I live in San Ramon. I'm game for doing some rides. I am hoping there is a group around here locally to get involved with. I joined the national BMW MOA and there is a Nor-cal chapter. Looks like their rides are fun but end up in campgrounds. I've done lot's of camping in my lifetime and have come to the conclusion that I enjoy a bed more than a sleeping bag (never thought I'd say that...used to tease my dad 'cuz he hated to camp, I understand where he was coming from now! ;) ) anyway you have to go to 2 meetings in order to join and it looks like the meetings are also rides/campouts. I dunno, we'll see. The first one is way down Hiway 1 past Big Sur. Don't think I can do that far of a trip till I fix the seat.

 

I'll post if I find something else.

 

Pete

 

I'm in Fairfield, work in Martinez. Bought my 02 RT the last weekend in June and have put over 7500 miles on it already. BeniciaRT_GT Richard helped me with my first service and what a difference it has made. I had thought about an earlier K1200GT but went with the RT instead. I've never looked back, this bike fits so well and is so smooth. I still love the look of the older K1200GT but I'm so happy with my RT. If you guys want to go for a ride, please contact me and I'll join you too!

 

Hawk

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It looks like we got enough riders in the Bay Area to start our own riding group. Who is going to do the planning? I am game...

 

My bike has been running great since my personal tech day with BeniciaRT and the subsequent faulty spark plug wire replacement. It has been a joy to ride and this nice stretch of weather has me taking full advantage of it.

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It looks like we got enough riders in the Bay Area to start our own riding group. Who is going to do the planning? I am game...

 

My bike has been running great since my personal tech day with BeniciaRT and the subsequent faulty spark plug wire replacement. It has been a joy to ride and this nice stretch of weather has me taking full advantage of it.

 

Unfortunately(well it's not unfortunate but in context it is!), I'm involved with the BMWCCA in their Car Control Clinics and their Teen Driver Safety Survival schools as an instructor. I autocross fairly regularly with the SCCA and am on a National rules advisory committee for the SCCA Solo Kart class. I try to race in as many kart road races as I can afford and my son sprint races a kart both locally (Infineon) and Nationally. I'm going to have to be a follower here, but am eager to meet some more beemerfiles and do some riding. I may have too many motorsports hobbies already, but what the heck, what's one more? :/

 

Pete

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So BeniciaRT, what can I offer you for one of those personal Tech days? ;)

 

Pete

 

Pete,

 

I think a good run around in one of those karts would be good! Davis isn't far from me at all...

 

Seriously, it is must a matter of timing! Just ask the other two nOObs, it takes a long time to coordinate, since my schedule is about as nuts as you'll find.

 

 

As to local rides, there are an unbelievable number of us in the Bay Area, and I plan on another spring ride this year. Annual "Get a Life" ride tale and prior ride Here.

 

PM sent with my number. We'll get something worked out...

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As to local rides, there are an unbelievable number of us in the Bay Area, and I plan on another spring ride this year. Annual "Get a Life" ride tale and prior ride Here.

 

Get a life ride? Let's go!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! When's the next one......

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Have a 02 1150RTP with 66k miles which I put 16k myself, only thing I changed is front brake rotors bike rides like a champ, dealer says I should be good for 100k

 

At least 100k.

 

I've got 137k and I'm still on the orginal:

rings

valves

clutch

transmission

main seal

tires (just kidding)

 

Replaced the crown bearing (Final Drive) at 108k. The local dealer has tightened the pivot bearings twice.

I'm on my third set of brake pads.

 

The starter is getting a little "iffy".

 

Yeah, that ol' 2002 sure is a POS.

 

:grin:

 

My boots have 85k miles on 'em.

Wanna snif?

:eek:

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