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Is there a good time for a flat?


eddd

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If I had to have a tire puncture, it couldn't get much better than the one I have right now. This morning when leaving for work I rolled the bike off the center stand in the garage, and it seemed to sit a little low. As soon as tried to roll it back I knew I had a problem.

 

 

Here is the culprit:

 

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How could this be good?

 

The old tire has 11,000 miles on it, and I already have a new ME 880 that I planned to mount tomorrow in preparation for a trip to Silver City next weekend. First flat in two years and 67,000 miles. I guess I shouldn't complain.

 

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Hey Ed,

I guess you can change it if you want to. I think I would..Whip's solution to a flat of just keeping your speed above 80 m.p.h. might not be a good idea once you get into your school zone this morning.. :grin:

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Whip's solution to a flat of just keeping your speed above 80 m.p.h. might not be a good idea once you get into your school zone this morning.. :grin:

 

Whips solution to a flat is to just get a new bike!! :grin:

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The old tire has 11,000 miles on it, and I already have a new ME 880 that I planned to mount tomorrow in preparation for a trip to Silver City next weekend.

 

Eddd,

 

I did it the other way around. I mounted the new tire and then get the flat with less than 500 miles on the tire. I think you've got it figured out :thumbsup:.

 

BTW, what was the culprit?

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The old tire has 11,000 miles on it, and I already have a new ME 880 that I planned to mount tomorrow in preparation for a trip to Silver City next weekend.

 

Eddd,

 

I did it the other way around. I mounted the new tire and then get the flat with less than 500 miles on the tire. I think you've got it figured out :thumbsup:.

 

BTW, what was the culprit?

 

I haven't pull it out yet, just took off my jacket, got in the truck, and headed off to work. I'll find out this afternoon. I also plan to perform a practice repair on the old one.

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I'll find out this afternoon. I also plan to perform a practice repair on the old one.
To do that you have to move the bike to a mud puddle and turn on a hose over it and you while you patch it wearing your rain gear, or perhaps where you are find a 200F strip of asphalt in the noon sun with no shade. Anything less isn't worthy practice...
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I'll find out this afternoon. I also plan to perform a practice repair on the old one.
To do that you have to move the bike to a mud puddle and turn on a hose over it and you while you patch it wearing your rain gear, or perhaps where you are find a 200F strip of asphalt in the noon sun with no shade. Anything less isn't worthy practice...

 

I was thinking about that...

 

I think I'll do it in the dark with a penlight clutched in my teeth. I'll also break some glass bottles first so I have something to kneel/sit on.

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I'll find out this afternoon. I also plan to perform a practice repair on the old one.
To do that you have to move the bike to a mud puddle and turn on a hose over it and you while you patch it wearing your rain gear, or perhaps where you are find a 200F strip of asphalt in the noon sun with no shade. Anything less isn't worthy practice...

 

I was thinking about that...

 

I think I'll do it in the dark with a penlight clutched in my teeth. I'll also break some glass bottles first so I have something to kneel/sit on.

 

No, no, no, you have to take the bike to the high road between Espanola and Taos in August when it's about 97, no shoulder, get started and then let the hailstorm pass over you. The major advantage to this is that you'll shock the snot out of yourself when you hook the pump up to the battery, while getting bruised by the hail, then cutting your hand real bad when it slips on the wet knife as you trim the licorice.

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no, no, you have to take the bike to the high road between Espanola and Taos in August when it's about 97, no shoulder, get started and then let the hailstorm pass over you. The major advantage to this is that you'll shock the snot out of yourself when you hook the pump up to the battery, while getting bruised by the hail, then cutting your hand real bad when it slips on the wet knife as you trim the licorice.

 

That's good Mark, that'll be tough to beat :wave:

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...trim the licorice.

 

There's something poetic about that... "Trim the licorice." Hmmm...

 

Will "I'll trim your licorice" replace the "I'll drink your milkshake" as the next catch phrase of all who are IN??

 

--

Mikko

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Four plugs in the same slash got me 20 miles to Minerville, Utah last Sept. Torrey.

Everyone should have a working knowlage of tire repair.... And a KOA tow card.

The plugs got me out of the badlands to cell service, three hours and not one car or truck passed me. Than a tow to Ceder City.

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Got my first ever screw in the tire this June. Been riding since '91. The tire had 5Kmi, but I thought it would last til 10K. But nobody would repair it. Cost $230 for a new tire with mounting.

Another 2Kmi, BOOM. I hit something. Yep another screw. This time it went head first through the new tire. It was not good. The steel belts were severed and the hole was 5/16". SO, I managed to get the first tire repaired. Since it was already off the rim, a auto tire repair shop put a good quality plug-patch. Then a motocycle dealer re-mounted the tire.

 

This repaired tire lasted two commutes to work before I discovered a nail in it.

 

Three injured tires this season :mad:

I bet you believe I ride in the gutter. Nope. And not directly behind cars either.

 

SO, I wish I had a bit of your luck Edd.

 

BTW, the "Stop and Go" repair kit did get me home. But it is one very scary repair kit. I would not suggest it to anyone. How would these folks at "stop and go" believe a greased plug (no adhesive) would stay reliably in a tire?? Even for a mile?

Since its purchace, I've found on this forum much better options.

Thankyou all.

 

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louisvillebob

EddyQ:

 

Have used the "lubricated plug" stopngo thing many times. The lubricated plugs hang in there well. I've picked up some weird stuff in tires. Have found a major limitation is that they are excellent for punctures and imbedded screw/nail situations, but are totally unable to handle slashes. What did u find that u liked better?

 

Ride safely.

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