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Wilbers setup for R1200RT


wsearl

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I'd like some pointers from those of you who have fitted Wilbers shocks to an R1200RT.

I have just fitted front and rear shocks and I wish to fine tune the compression and rebound settings. I realise that the settings are different for each individual, but would appreciate a few tips to get me started. The shocks have come with preload set to the weights I gave them at purchase time (i.e. solo incl. riding gear 220lb, with luggage 285 lb, with pillion and luggage 485 lb)

So the base settings that the shocks came with are for solo riding - how much additional preload should be dialed in for the luggage and pillion options? there are no graduations on the remote preload dial to show how many extra mm you are adding - and with the front shock, how many turns of the ring represent how many mm of change?

The high and low compression came set at 12 clicks and the rebound on both shocks at 13 clicks - just above half way with 22 clicks available. I find the ride too harsh and I was wondering what settings I should use to begin my experimentation - and should I change the high and low compression setting by the same amount or one more than the other?

I would really appreciate hearing of your experiences with various settings.

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This is how they recommended setting up suspension at the Lee Parks Total Control Class I took. It takes a couple helpers.

 

Rebound - Back the rebound dampening all the way off (front and back, but not at the same time. Stick to one shock at a time). Count the clicks as you back it off so you can get it back to where you started if needed.

 

For the front, straddle the bike. Push hard (really hard) down on the handlebars and let them rebound by themselves. They will pogo/oscillate/whatever you want to call it. Start increasing the dampening, one click at a time and repeat the push/rebound. When the shock comes back up smoothly and stops at the top without pogo'ing, you're there. You may want to just check it first at the factory setting and make sure it works, unless you want to practice.

 

The back shock dampening is set up the same, but you'll need your friends (mates??) to push down hard on the rear seat/rack and let it rebound. Increase the dampening a click at a time and recheck until the rear shock rebounds smoothly (not too slow), but stops at the top without pogo'ing.

 

Here is a link to a similar reply I did on Advrider on the preload ...

 

Wilbers preload settings

 

When I got my Wilbers, the minimum preload was set to low on the rear shock. I could tell because the static sag was about 30% of shock travel when it should have been 10%. I had to send it back to get it corrected.

 

 

 

 

 

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Like you said, every rider is different.

 

Generally speaking, you want the minimum amount of rebound damping without wallowing - i.e. you want the suspension to be able to react yet maintain control. We usually set up with higher rebound rates in the rear (the rear extends slightly slower than the front). On the front the rebounbd should slightly overshoot (with warm suspension - the fluid gets quite warm in the shock and that affects damping) then settle without bouncing.

 

Harshness is related to compression damping. If you have separate high and low speed adjustments (which I gather you do) harshness usually comes comes from sharp impacts (square edge bumps). This is the high speed circuit. The low speed compression circuit comes into play more when accelerating off a corner or over gradual undulations in the road surface.

 

If I sound vague by saying generally or usually over and again, it's because there are no hard and fast rules, only guidelines. You need to experiment and make notes. If you have a passenger, add a couple of turns of preload, which necessitates additional rebound damping and see how it feels. Take some time to add or subtract from your new settings until feels right. Then record that setting (of course you already have your one up baseline recorded).

 

This is my approach, hope it helps.

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This is how they recommended setting up suspension at the Lee Parks Total Control Class I took. It takes a couple helpers.

 

Rebound - Back the rebound dampening all the way off (front and back, but not at the same time. Stick to one shock at a time). Count the clicks as you back it off so you can get it back to where you started if needed.

 

For the front, straddle the bike. Push hard (really hard) down on the handlebars and let them rebound by themselves. They will pogo/oscillate/whatever you want to call it. Start increasing the dampening, one click at a time and repeat the push/rebound. When the shock comes back up smoothly and stops at the top without pogo'ing, you're there. You may want to just check it first at the factory setting and make sure it works, unless you want to practice.

 

The back shock dampening is set up the same, but you'll need your friends (mates??) to push down hard on the rear seat/rack and let it rebound. Increase the dampening a click at a time and recheck until the rear shock rebounds smoothly (not too slow), but stops at the top without pogo'ing.

 

Here is a link to a similar reply I did on Advrider on the preload ...

 

Wilbers preload settings

 

When I got my Wilbers, the minimum preload was set to low on the rear shock. I could tell because the static sag was about 30% of shock travel when it should have been 10%. I had to send it back to get it corrected.

 

 

 

 

 

Al,

Thanks, this is all excellent information - just what I was looking for.

Bill

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I forgot to mention. I've never seen a good way to set compression dampening other than riding the bike and seeing how it feels.

 

I'd suggest leaving the high and low compression dampening on the factory settings and see how it rides.

 

Following up on what Koop said, if it's too mushy in the corners, increase the low speed compression one click. If it's too stiff, decrease it a click. The idea is if you're in a corner and the wheel hits some kind of irregularity, you don't loose contact with the surface and loose traction.

 

On the high speed compression side, if you accidentally hit something in the road like a pot hole or something with a sharp edge and the shock bottoms out, increase the dampening one click. If you accidentally hit something with a sharp edge and it's too stiff, back it off one click.

 

Lot's of trial and error on compression dampening.

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