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Fuel Gauge Problem on R1200RT??


imeyers

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I currently have the R1200RT. I have about 360 miles on it so far and the fuel gauge has stopped working. The dealer had the tank off the bike to wire it for a Navigation system, and after that no matter how much fuel is in the tank it reads dead empty with 0 miles to go. When I fill the tank it the guage goes up maybe 1 bar then goes back to dead empty again in a few minutes. Any suggestions. My dealer ordered me something for the guage but I was wondering if anyone here knew of a quick fix. dopeslap.gif

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Post the name of this dealer so we can avoid them.

 

JW

 

I currently have the R1200RT. I have about 360 miles on it so far and the fuel gauge has stopped working. The dealer had the tank off the bike to wire it for a Navigation system, and after that no matter how much fuel is in the tank it reads dead empty with 0 miles to go. When I fill the tank it the guage goes up maybe 1 bar then goes back to dead empty again in a few minutes. Any suggestions. My dealer ordered me something for the guage but I was wondering if anyone here knew of a quick fix. dopeslap.gif
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Actually, I think that the dealer i use is incredible. I will not give out their name because I do not want it to become a campaign against them as they have done nothing wrong. On a scale of 1 to 10 I give them an 11. They are the nicest people to deal with and it is like you are a friend more than a customer. They have been around for over 20 years and I hope they will be there for another 20 now that I own a BWM. Oh and by the way the fuel gauge problem is fixed.

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They undoubtedly just left the fuel level sensor disconnected. You could tear into it yourself, but why bother? Have them make it right.

 

I wouldn't condemn the dealer for all of eternity for just this one transgression. If they have a pattern of screw ups, yes. But a disconnected fuel sensor on a new model they are not yet fully familiar with is a pretty easy thing to miss.

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I have a pretty low threshold for mistakes like this. This is something that should have been easily caught since the ODBII will throw a code for a disconnected sensor.

 

We depend on these machines with our lives... MUCH more so than an automobile (although clearly there are mistakes that can be made when working on an automobile which can easily risk lives).

 

This time its a fuel sensor left disconnected... who's to say the next time it won't be a brake line or a kinked throttle cable or???

 

Sorry... I'd be having a serious discussion with the manager over something like this. Perhaps this time its no big deal... but gang; stupid crap like this can get people killed... plain and simple.

 

Attention to detail is important. Even if it was simply that the sensor went bad at an in-opportune time... it SHOULD have been caught before delivery to the customer.

 

Perhaps because I fly aircraft and see an analogy between motorcycles and aircraft I have a lower tolerance for mistakes.

 

Ciao

 

JW

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Sorry... I'd be having a serious discussion with the manager over something like this. Perhaps this time its no big deal... but gang; stupid crap like this can get people killed... plain and simple.

 

Certainly, you don't have to apologize. wink.gif

 

In theory, I agree with you. At the same time, I'm not going to "hang out" a dealer for a single mistake, especially if I have a long and positive track record with them, as seems to be the case in this situation. Plus, none of us know for sure that this is the problem, only an assumption has been made.

 

None of us are infallable.

 

I understand your analogy between flying and riding motorcycles, and if my dealer left the front or rear wheel loose after having new tires installed (as I've read reports about here), then a different kind of discussion would take place.

 

If it turns out to be the sensor because it was left unplugged, and this is one more mistake in a long line of mistakes, then I agree, have a serious and impressionable chat with the dealer. eek.gifthumbsup.gif

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i agree - if it gives any reading it sounds more like the sensor (maybe in the tank) was damaged/loosed when the tank was removed...in either case it appears to be a dealer caused fault and i would be bringing it back to them immediately.

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Everything is working fine. There is no more problem. The dealer did not do anything that was wrong. Maybe whatever reads the gas in the tank shifted and got hung up when the tank was removed. Once I let the gas in the tank go down to almost empty and then filled it again, the guage worked fine. No dealer would have forseen this or even thought about it for that matter when they removed the tank. The gas warning light was not on when I picked up the bike from them so they has no reason to suspect something was wrong until the next time I filled the tank. Everyone should be so lucky to have a dealer like mine, it is just to bad I can't name them in this post because a few people have chosen to make this into an anti-dealer campaign which is not what I intended.

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Sorry... I'd be having a serious discussion with the manager over something like this. Perhaps this time its no big deal... but gang; stupid crap like this can get people killed... plain and simple.

 

Get a life! If you're that paranoid, stop riding a motorbike and find a nice safe cage to travel around in.

 

Paul

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I agree get a life. It is not like they forgot to tighten the front wheel or something. This was something very minor and totally unforseen. If you are worried about getting killed, stay home and meditate. This guy would probably write his dealer off for putting a sticker .001mm off center.

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BeniciaRT_GT
I have a pretty low threshold for mistakes like this. This is something that should have been easily caught since the ODBII will throw a code for a disconnected sensor.

 

We depend on these machines with our lives... MUCH more so than an automobile (although clearly there are mistakes that can be made when working on an automobile which can easily risk lives).

 

This time its a fuel sensor left disconnected... who's to say the next time it won't be a brake line or a kinked throttle cable or???

 

Sorry... I'd be having a serious discussion with the manager over something like this. Perhaps this time its no big deal... but gang; stupid crap like this can get people killed... plain and simple.

 

Attention to detail is important. Even if it was simply that the sensor went bad at an in-opportune time... it SHOULD have been caught before delivery to the customer.

 

Perhaps because I fly aircraft and see an analogy between motorcycles and aircraft I have a lower tolerance for mistakes.

 

Ciao

 

JW

 

Perhaps you should know a little more about what kind of work is done (or not none) on aircraft!

 

I have some wonderful stories, but maybe this will wet your whistle.

 

As a life long professional mechanic, and having flown both fixed and rotary wing craft, I temper my constant attempts to be perfect, with the fact that the treatment, training, and pay for a motorcycle/aircraft/auto mechanic in no way breeds time for absolute attention to detail and/or perfection. I'm sure you have never made a mistake flying, but you should consider that most people aren't quite that perfect. Tolerance and respect go a long way to eyeing a trend, where overreaction might be a more appropriate path.

 

YMMV,

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I dunno if this is a thread hijack, but my Extremely Reputable dealer replaced all the brake pads front and rear on my R1100RT last winter on their recommendation, along with other stuff, and I paid the bill.

 

Recently, 3500 miles later I was back for a quick while-you-wait oil change before a trip, and when it was done they said my rear brake pads were worn thin so they'd gone ahead and replaced them (without asking my permission) and presented the bill.

 

I was surprised, to say the least, and I told my SA they'd just done a complete brake pad job 3500 miles ago (and I don't ride my rear brake). Sure enough, their computer history check revealed that I'd paid for a complete brake job front an rear but the mechanic apparently had "forgotten" to do the rear brakes among the several other maintenance items done that day. To make matters worse, I then had to listen to two SAs debating with each other over how likely it was that I could have worn out rear brake pads that fast and whether I should be charged (again) for the rear brake job.

 

I was starting to boil listening to this, but in the end, my SA apologized for the screwup and noted that that mechanic had quit not long ago after having worked there many years, so I wouldn't be charged (again) today for the brake job. I told him it was lucky I stopped in there for an oil change before a trip, and he chuckled, agreed, and apologized again.

 

Things like this happen, but I'm very reluctant to go back there again for any safety-related work.

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