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jbr7t

1974 R75/6

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jbr7t

Hey everyone, I just acquired this bike. So far I am really enjoying it. Just wanted to throw this thread out and see if anyone had any usefull tidbits or hints....things to look out for, avoid, good, bad...etc. Thanks.

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BMWSTeve

Hello James,

 

The R75/6 1974 model year was my first bike and an excellant choice by you,(wanna sell it?). the Airheads BMW site is the best place for info, but I can give you a quick and dirty rundown.

 

Good

 

 

Smoooth, very low inthe engine vibes. I believe the 750 motor to have the perfect balance of hp vs vibrations.

 

 

Bad

 

 

You will spent countless hours and dollars to figure it out and perfect your "Airhead experience". Maybe that is a good thing?

 

 

In all honesty, if you have some wrenching ability you will have a good time.My disclaimer is that it is dependent on shape of the bike and previous owners care. My 750 was a rat with numerous problems which I sorted enough to ride 22,000 miles in 2 seasons before I wrecked it.

 

have fun.

 

 

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jbr7t

Thanks Steve,

It's currently got just over 50k on it. Seems to be a very smooth bike like you were saying. I got it from my cousin who was the second owner. He knows the original owner and has verified that the bike was well cared for aside from not being ridden enough! It could use some fixing up cosmetically here and there but mechanically everything appears to be in good order.

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ShovelStrokeEd

One thing to keep in mind on these bikes is that they have a very low oil capacity. As I recall 1.5 quarts. Oil change intervals should be pretty short and do keep an eye on the oil level. Keep an oil filter and the necessary tools to change it in stock.

 

A well maintained one is a joy to own. The brakes are not up to modern standards but ain't all that bad as the bike is pretty light.

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Huzband

Oil capacity is 2.4 qts. with a filter change.

 

Take a look at the rear splines. At 50k, it's likely they're starting to show some wear. As long as they still look good, lube them & check again in 25k.

 

I'd go ahead & replace the points & condenser with new ones. If the condenser is old, it'll burn & pit the points in a hurry.

 

I'd also pull the tops of the carbs off & check the diaphragms for dry rot. With the age of the bike, & you stated it hasn't been ridden much lately, it would be good assurance to know they are in good shape. You don't want one to give up out on the road.

Edited by Huzband

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snod
I'd go ahead & replace the points & condenser with new ones. If the condenser is old, it'll burn & pit the points in a hurry.

 

Disconnect the neg side of the battery before you start to pull the front cover to get to the points. If you touch the diode board with the front cover while it is grounded, you will need a new diode board. Last one I paid for was >$90, and that was many years ago. Great bike, I put 120k on mine. Sometimes I wish I had it back, very, very smooth. Good advice on the carb diaphrams also. Tighten the center stand bolts every valve adjustment. If not kept tight they will strip the threads in the frame. Don't park it on the side stand, it will smoke from the left side when started if you do.

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Huzband

Disconnect the neg side of the battery before you start to pull the front cover to get to the points.

 

A tasty detail I had forgotten about. :thumbsup:

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jbr7t

Sounds like some good stuff. I'm still working on my wrenchin skills so I don't know if getting to the splines is gonna be something I'll tackle on my own, but I think I can manage the other stuff. I'm hoping to have a weekend to work on it in the not too distant future.

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snod

The splines that Huz is talking about are between the rear wheel, and the final drive. No special tools or skills required for normal maintenance. It disassembles when you take the rear wheel off. The wheel side is replaceable, but the final drive side requires serious (expensive?) machine work to repair. Clean, lube and inspect the splines every time you have the rear wheel off. Replace the wheel side a little early, to help preserve the drive side. They do wear, and if you put enough miles on the bike they will need replaced. Huz is also right that 50k is probably about the time you expect to be replacing the wheel side. If you need to replace, it is a bit of pain, but very doable at home.

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jbr7t

Oh..ok. I was thinking we were talking about taking the trans / drivetrain / etc apart to get to it. I could probably manage a wheel!! :thumbsup:

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jbr7t

Any of you guys need an excuse to visit Va?? Helpin a novice "wrencher" sounds like a good one to me! I've get a spare bed. :clap: Just figured it couldn't hurt to check!

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Huzband

I'd like to, but 670 miles...

 

Don't know right now when I could work it in. I'll keep it in mind, though.

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jbr7t
I'd like to, but 670 miles...

 

Don't know right now when I could work it in. I'll keep it in mind, though.

 

:( I understand! I may try to catch up with my Great Uncle. He has a garage and lift that would def. be nice to use!!! Gotta love family.

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louisvillebob

Good purchase! These old airheads will last darn near forever if properly taken care of. They are easy to work on; stuff is easy to get to--ya don't have to disassemble the whole bike to work on stuff. Parts are still readily available (new or used). There's a whole fraternity of "Airheads" out there that delight in riding/maintaining/discussing these bikes. See www.airheads.org My dad and I just rode ours from KY to WY and back last month. There's a certain enjoyment comes from being able to maintain and work on yer own bike and understand how it works.

 

Good luck with yours.

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BMWR90

My first and (as of yet) only bike is a '75 R90/6. I absolutely love it! Have fun with it, if you take care of it it'll take GREAT care of you. I ride mine everywhere, from back and forth to work to 600+ mile days.

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Rinkydink

You can also check out boxerworks.com as it is the "second best" forum IMHO. Lots of airhead specific tales and tips.

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