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Hey, what do you engineer types think of these valve stems?


Couchrocket

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I know that there can be a problem w/ the "add on" 90 degree valve stems, but what do you engineer types think about this design?

 

cutaway_mcacom_345x224.jpg

 

Here is their web site . I'd love to have these on my RT if they were "safe".... ??????

 

Professional / qualified opinions please!

 

No connection, yadda, yadda... I just want some and a friend showed me this web link.

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I have these on the front (only ) of my 03 RT & my wife's 03GT

Will not work on the rear & not really needed.

Not sure if the price is the lowest that these can be had for but the color selection is the greatest I've seen offered.

 

Not sure how many miles I've loged with them at this time.

Perhaps 35k for both bikes?

 

Look for my post here for a link to a cheeper vender.

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I know that there can be a problem w/ the "add on" 90 degree valve stems, but what do you engineer types think about this design?

 

cutaway_mcacom_345x224.jpg

 

Here is their web site . I'd love to have these on my RT if they were "safe".... ??????

 

Professional / qualified opinions please!

 

No connection, yadda, yadda... I just want some and a friend showed me this web link.

 

 

I'm no engineer...but I think they have a high probablity that they will leak. It seems as though half the stem is missing!! grin.giflurker.gif

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high probablity that they will leak
That just goest to show how much you know! It is obvious to me that you must buy them in pairs! lmao.gif
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Jim VonBaden
high probablity that they will leak
That just goest to show how much you know! It is obvious to me that you must buy them in pairs! lmao.gif

 

So I should have ordered four pairs? dopeslap.gif

 

I'll let everyone know, I just ordered two sets. One set for me, and one for Tina.

 

Jim cool.gif

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The front stems are a pain to access on the rims of the five spoke cast rims of that vintage.
You can say that again... contortionist I'm not. While it is "doable" to access the front stem from the starboard side of the front wheel, it is a pain in the butt, and if these stems are mechanically sound, I'd love to have one on the front so that I could do my check / fill from the port side for both wheels. The rear is a piece of cake stock. (04 RT)
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russell_bynum
The front stems are a pain to access on the rims of the five spoke cast rims of that vintage.

 

Ah. OK, that makes sense.

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Lone_RT_rider
I know that there can be a problem w/ the "add on" 90 degree valve stems, but what do you engineer types think about this design?

 

cutaway_mcacom_345x224.jpg

 

Here is their web site . I'd love to have these on my RT if they were "safe".... ??????

 

Professional / qualified opinions please!

 

No connection, yadda, yadda... I just want some and a friend showed me this web link.

 

Well, I used to work for the company that made that little screw in thingy on the end there. You know, the part that you press on to let all the air out? From what I can see, there is only one part that differs from the standard rubber style valves you have installed at most auto tire places. Without having an installation drawing in front of me, the biggest difference I can see is the change from a radial seal (rubber valve stem) at the interface to the rim to a compression seal on this model using the lock down nut. They state that there is a lock down torque of 7.2 ft-lbs, which in itself might be ok if this wasn't an assembly in a rotating wheel that takes abrupt forces on EVERY ride you take. I personally wouldn't trust it without applying some sort of thread-locker during installation (Maybe blue loctite?). That's about the only thing I can see that I might take issue with. But hey, I have been known to be a bit conservative in the area of design. grin.gifthumbsup.gif

 

Shawn

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Let me clarify my original info / opinion request.

 

I used to ride a GL1800 and they have 90 degree stems that have a little plastic clip that captures the "L" and prevents centrifugal (centripetal?) force from causing a somewhat catastrophic failure of the fitting. I've read more than one report where riders lost or broke the plastic clip and had a valve stem fail completely and quickly. Also, I have read more than one report of the "add on" L extensions causing failure for the same reason re forces generated.

 

So, I guess my question to you engineer types "really is".... "Since these valves are "bolted in" (so to speak) is there any chance of failure due to the forces generated from a non-straight-up-and-down valve stem?

 

Thanks (again!)...

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It would appear that most of the mass is located perpendicular to the wheel. Also it does not appear that the stem sits that far off the wheel rim. Looking at the assembly it appears to be fairly robust ie the retaining ring that holds the stem in place. I would like to know what alloy it is made from but it would appear that its not plastic. I agree with Lone RT Rider and would also loc tite it. Use a high strength formula for appropriate thread size.

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Let me clarify my original info / opinion request.........

So, I guess my question to you engineer types "really is".... "Since these valves are "bolted in" (so to speak) is there any chance of failure due to the forces generated from a non-straight-up-and-down valve stem?

 

Thanks (again!)...

 

Scott (& others) take the time to read the info from the link provided in your original post.

Our particular combination of technologies represents the absolute best in every category of tire valve design -- evaluate it for yourself:

 

Solid high-strength billet aluminum gets drilled, milled and tapped to the exactly correct dimensions.

This means the entire valve body is made of a single piece which can not separate or tear during use, nor can it be cut by flying debris, nor by a vandal with a knife or box-cutter blade;

 

The body is then treated with a DIN- & ANSI-standard deep anodizing treatment.

This prevents the body from ever rusting and hardens the surface harder than steel, providing a perfect barrier against the elements and road-debris impacts;

 

A specially formulated EPDM gasket is attached to the base.

This gasket is weather-proof, highly chemical resistant (including acetone, vinegar, etc.), won't dry out like a rubber gasket, and gives a secure seal from -22°F to +248° (-30 to +120°C). This gasket is designed to seal the valve/wheel interface for a period of at minimum 10 years of active use, and means this tire stem should not be replaced when changing tires (reduces tire swapping labor and costs).

 

The base is mated to an matched hex-nut that mates to the inside of the tire to seal the gasket and hold the valve in place, and the matched hex-nut is pre-coated with anti-vibration sealant.

This valve will never "pop out" under use while it is mounted in the rim, nor will the nut ever vibrate off the stem;

 

The neck is angled at a perfectly engineered 82 degrees.

Prevents the high-G valve opening phenomena (by putting the schrader valve at a steep angle to the outward force of rotation), while still leaving you enough room to fit an air chuck, compressor tip and/or tire pressure gauge into the opening easily from the side of the wheel (not always the case with 90 degree valves). Because of the angle, you are also far less likely to burn yourself on a hot brake rotor or get your hands greasy on a chain while trying to add air to your tire (or take a pressure reading);

 

The inner valve-core system itself is actual Schrader-brand.

Schrader is the single most trusted and most reliable brand valve-core on the market -- in fact, in 1891 August Schrader invented the standard valve that is still used in cars and motorcycles today (amusing: it took him another 4 years to invent the tire valve cap), and his firm has made virtually every single improvement in tire valve-core design since then;

 

A color-matched aluminum anodized tire cap.

to complete the "look" and to keep dirt out of the tire valve assembly while providing a secondary seal;

 

A total mounting weight just under of 0.8 ounces (8/10th of one ounce: 20 grams) per valve.

This low weight reduces total rotational weight on the wheel and reduces stresses in the tire stem mounting area (these valves are actually lighter than many of the sturdy rubber stems on the market -- because they're solid billet aluminum, we can make parts thinner and yet stronger than their rubber equivalents). These are also lighter than virtually every steel valve system on the market (none of which are as pretty or as well-engineered).

 

And finally, if all that wasn't enough:

It's a once-in-a-lifetime install item. You will never need to replace your tire valves again!

After examining numerous tire valve failures over the past couple decades of riding, the solution was utterly obvious from an engineering stand-point: this particular valve design combination. Every single detail has been scrutinized and triple-checked for full functionality, then field tested in a variety of continents under a whole slew of possible conditions, and this is the ultimate solution. Even the notoriously strict German TueV engineering inspection approval system has approved these for street-use in Germany!

There simply isn't a better motorcycle tire valve available. Period.

 

All thats left is to believe/trust this info.... if you don't, then this product is not for you.

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All thats left is to believe/trust this info....
Which is exactly why I asked my question. I trust some of the folk here, Mitch for instance, more than I'd trust advertising copy.
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I've had similar ones (made by/sold by Ducati) on my fronts for a few 10's of thousands of miles with no leaks--I love 'em! cool.gif

 

I think I put up a post about them a year or two ago . . . . wink.gif

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skinny_tom (aka boney)
I have these on the front (only ) of my 03 RT & my wife's 03GT

Will not work on the rear & not really needed.

Not sure if the price is the lowest that these can be had for but the color selection is the greatest I've seen offered.

 

Not sure how many miles I've loged with them at this time.

Perhaps 35k for both bikes?

 

Look for my post here for a link to a cheeper vender.

 

Be aware! The link in the previous post is for the 8.3mm hole. The BMW is an 11.3mm hole.

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