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jbr7t

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Want to start doing some camping trips on the bike. I have a lot of stuff from my days in the Boy Scouts but am looking for a smaller tent / bivy sack. Any recommendations?

 

Also, what sort of things do you make sure you take with you. I've found a couple lists on-line but most seem a little overboard to me. I'm used to doing backpacking and going for 3-10 days at a time with a 50-70 lb. pack. A few lists I've found show about 100 + lbs. of gear. Thanks for the input.

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Charles Elms

I'm used to doing backpacking and going for 3-10 days at a time with a 50-70 lb. pack.

 

Start with your backpacking gear. When backpacking most of your weight will be water and food. You can buy your food each day on the bike and your campsites will have water. I only carry coffee and one dehydrated meal. Most of the time I get my coffee at my first stop in the morning and eat my dinner early before I set up camp. Makes for quick get-a-ways in the morning. I carry a slightly larger tent, but that's all the changes I make when camping on the bike. Just remember that you are never far from a Walmart. If you forget something, it's no big deal. smile.gif

 

As you spend more time camping this way you will figure out what's important. For example, you don't usually need a super warm bag because your riding jacket will make a nice extra cover over 1/2 your body. Stuff like that you figure out quickly. Just do it thumbsup.gif

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For example, you don't usually need a super warm bag because your riding jacket will make a nice extra cover over 1/2 your body. Stuff like that you figure out quickly. Just do it thumbsup.gif

thumbsup.gif

 

HMM Good idea, hadn't thougt about that. I've been thinking about it and like you say, if I get the food and water before stopping I'll be able to get away with a pretty light load.

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Charles Elms

If you are going solo, nothing wrong with 100+ pounds. Ever think what a normal passenger weighs? I usually take a folding camp chair for extra comfort. A small foam crushable cooler lets you stop for ice and take it to camp. Canoeing dry bags keep extra stuff dry and strap on passenger seat. My bike loaded for trip across country.

Daypack has raingear.

loadedbikesmallfo2.jpg

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Very interesting question and topical for me. I have been doing some serious research on this topic since an opportunity came up for a MC/canoe/camping/hiking trip next summer about a month ago. I'm creating my own shopping list for purchase over the winter season when prices drop.

 

My background is military 'camping' with a serious lean toward only what's essential. The whole notion of tramping around with a mini version of my home seems particularily at odds with the whole camping thing. If I were going to do that I'd much rather just get a room at the local Motel 6 and save all the hassle. Please no flames folks, it's only my opinion. During this research I found some very interesting reading on the internet on Ultralight Backpacking/Camping. Ray Jardine being a pretty strong influence in this area both positive and negative depending on your opinion. It might not be for everyone, but it certainly appeals to me and my SO.

 

Try googling his name or ultralight backpacking and you'll find plenty of info pros and cons on his methodology. The really interesting part to me is that many years after one of his early books 'Beyond Backpacking' which was considered extremely controversial at the time there is a plethora of gear specifically targeted at this type of camping/backpacking available at the big chains.

 

IMHO it blends very nicely with MC culture. Not necessarily the light part as much as the small volume and purposeful choice toward minimal function and engagement in the activity rather than total comfort and removal from the environment. A crude analogy would be MC riding is to a cage driving is the same Ultralight camping is to conventional camping.

 

Good luck with your search and let us know what you decide on.

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I carry emergency meals. Usually just oatmeal and tea for breakfast, a freeze dried meal or two for suppers, and some energy bars to get me through missed lunches. Cooking is a single pot and stove to boil water. Obviously, I look forward to dining out, but don't have to worry or go out of my way if I can't find something along the path.

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All you really need is a canteen, knife, and a flint.

 

ISYHTRAH

 

Talk about your ULTRAlight camping.

 

This is the preliminary list I've come up with:

 

Obviously clothes dependent on the weather and length of trip (yes many will be multi day wear!! tongue.gif)

Riding pants, jacket, boots

Rain gear

Tent

Sleeping Bag and foam pad

flip flops

matches

zip lock bag of dryer lint (GREAT for starting fires)

I figure I'll pick up food and water along the way. I'm sure my list will change as I get into it and see what I use/don't use and what I say, oh $#*! I forgot _____. dopeslap.gif

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1+ WHat he said! 'cept I like to have all my stuff in one bag. Preferably water proof. I've done the color matching white water bags and just got a Rev Pack bag that zips across the top. Sort of a U-pack design. All the light weight stuff I have now fits with room to spare.

Biggest single item is a Thermarest pad. added comfort for aging bones.

I always use straps gleamed from the BMW dealer to hold stuff in place. Bungees have been know to let your stuff fly in the wind. wave.gif

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All you really need is a canteen, knife, and a flint.

 

ISYHTRAH

 

Talk about your ULTRAlight camping.

 

This is the preliminary list I've come up with:

 

Obviously clothes dependent on the weather and length of trip (yes many will be multi day wear!! tongue.gif)

Riding pants, jacket, boots

Rain gear

Tent

Sleeping Bag and foam pad

flip flops

matches

zip lock bag of dryer lint (GREAT for starting fires)

I figure I'll pick up food and water along the way. I'm sure my list will change as I get into it and see what I use/don't use and what I say, oh $#*! I forgot _____. dopeslap.gif

 

Well you are correct. However, you have your riding pants and boots on all the time pretty much anyway. So all you really need on top of my list is a couple pair of socks, couple pair of underwear, a couple of BMW T shirts, and of course, your toothbrush.

 

 

 

ISYHTRAH

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I go fairly light. Eurika Timberlight backpackers tent, if I'm staying more than one night in one location, I throw in the Eurika vestibule that goes with the tent. Clear plastic groundcloth under the tent. Inside, 3/4 length original thickness Thermarest, Slumberjack lightweight down backpackers tent, a twin bed sheet to line the bag, and Slumberjack packable quolifil camp pillow.

 

All of this put into a dry bag weights less than 16lbs, and bungies easily to the pillon seat.

 

I get food on the road, but normally throw a couple of MREs in the bags as backup food.

 

Don't forget one of the wringable camp towels.

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BluesTraveler

Me, I bring it all. I will be comfortable when camping from the bike. All my gear sets up fast and either deflates, folds and breaks down to pack easily on the bike.

 

DSCN7089.jpg[/img]

 

A lot of the gear has been modified to fit on the bike. Ane if its something I need and no one makes it I make it myself.

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Me, I bring it all. I will be comfortable when camping from the bike. All my gear sets up fast and either deflates, folds and breaks down to pack easily on the bike.

 

DSCN7089.jpg[/img]

 

A lot of the gear has been modified to fit on the bike. Ane if its something I need and no one makes it I make it myself.

 

What brand/model is that tent?

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BluesTraveler

Thats a Mountain Hardware Wedge 3. Here it is with rain fly. With rainfly it has a decent size vestibule.

 

AWedge3.jpg[/img]

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Want to start doing some camping trips on the bike. I have a lot of stuff from my days in the Boy Scouts but am looking for a smaller tent / bivy sack. Any recommendations?

 

Also, what sort of things do you make sure you take with you. I've found a couple lists on-line but most seem a little overboard to me. I'm used to doing backpacking and going for 3-10 days at a time with a 50-70 lb. pack. A few lists I've found show about 100 + lbs. of gear. Thanks for the input.

 

A lot of it depends on when and where you're going to be doing this camping. In the summertime, my platypus in the tankbag is invaluable. In the spring/fall, the electric gear is the same. Also, if you're boondockin' or backcountry camping, water is not guaranteed. (BYO) Also, fire restrictions may prevent the ability to light up... so a small campstove (JetBoil/MSR/Etc) works wonders.

 

One final recommendation: purchase some compression sacks. Individual ones... one for the tent... one for the sleeping bag... one for the jacket/pant liners... one for dirty clothing... etc.

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A lot of it depends on when and where you're going to be doing this camping. In the summertime, my platypus in the tankbag is invaluable. In the spring/fall, the electric gear is the same. Also, if you're boondockin' or backcountry camping, water is not guaranteed. (BYO) Also, fire restrictions may prevent the ability to light up... so a small campstove (JetBoil/MSR/Etc) works wonders.

 

One final recommendation: purchase some compression sacks. Individual ones... one for the tent... one for the sleeping bag... one for the jacket/pant liners... one for dirty clothing... etc.

 

Good ideas. I have a couple compression sacks already. 1 for the sleeping back and one for "stuff" I'll have to see what size tent I get for that to fit!

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I met a group of riders from tide water area. They were touring rt 460 going west. They carried min. and stopped at bike shops , restraunts and motels( 1 group to a room).Occasionaly they actuall camped.The previose year they followed rt 58.

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BluesTraveler

Yea, there is always one in the group. But for those times when there is no table to settup on i've been working on a folding mount for my rack. This would allow for me to cook right off the back of my GSA.

p><p> <a href=2969675890031153994zvINxM_th.jpg' alt='2

Still working on the mounting system but will be nice when I get it done.

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I think that the advice you've already received--to plan like a backpacker--is wise. To an extent, I find that less is more. By having fewer items to pack, unpack, and screw around with, things seem to be easier and I end up with more time.

 

First, while it's not "camping gear," your selection of clothing is important. The synthetics are great--they pack small, dry quickly, and allow you to easily launder them in a sink or tub. Assuming you've already got your clothing, travel gadgets (like GPS, camera, binoculars, flashlight, etc.) figured out, here's what I add:

 

-Tent with room for me and my gear, must have a vestibule (REI Half Dome)

-Ground cloth for tent

-Sleeping bag (varies with temperature, but always a synthetic fill for me)

-Therm-a-Rest inflatable mattress

-Stuff sack pillow

-Rope (for drying stuff)

-Cooking gear (at most a kettle or two; aluminum or titanium)

-Stove & fuel (my JetBoil also includes the cooking cup, replacing the kettle above)

-Utensils, plate or bowl & cup

-Spices and herbs (I just throw a bunch of stuff together--sometimes a little Herbes de Provence can transform packaged foods eek.gif)

-Nalgene bottle

-Matches & lighter

-LED lantern

-Chair

-Folding basin/sink

-Campsuds

-Towel(s)

 

Note that this list doesn't include everything you'll need--I assume you already have made provisions for lighting and tools, as well as other things that will serve dual purposes and which may be helpful in camp.

 

That's pretty much it for me. Long ago, I'd pack much more and found that much of what I packed went unused. The best approach to cooking, at least for me, is to do a minimal amount--I'll bring what I need to make coffee (sometimes, ugh, instant) and to basically just heat things (noodles, soups, stew-type stuff, etc.), not cook them from scratch. When you start to get more ambitious about your outdoor cooking, it's easy to add a lot of extra gear; I've found it more of a burden.

 

One thing I'd note about camping is that, while I keep my list somewhat basic, I've always allowed myself a luxury or two--a wider and thicker mattress, a comfy chair, or something of a similar ilk. I figure that I do, after all, have the capacity to carry more than I would in a backpack, and that a small luxury can really pay off in terms of making a tolerable camping experience into a pleasant one.

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Mike,

Thanks for the input. I am definetly leaning toward the "act like a backpacker" mode of packing. I think that the only things I will need to find are a good sleeping bag and some sort of small foldup chair. Besides those items I'm going to start out with my backpacking things and add / delete from that. I am a little worried about my current sleeping bag as it is a mummy bag rated to -30. Great in the winter...but horrible this time of year. I am looking into a lighter summer bag.

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Mike,

Thanks for the input. I am definetly leaning toward the "act like a backpacker" mode of packing. I think that the only things I will need to find are a good sleeping bag and some sort of small foldup chair. Besides those items I'm going to start out with my backpacking things and add / delete from that. I am a little worried about my current sleeping bag as it is a mummy bag rated to -30. Great in the winter...but horrible this time of year. I am looking into a lighter summer bag.

 

I used to always carry a bed sheet with me when I was camping. It rolled right up in my sleeping bag and I never new it was there once it was packed. On cold nights, I would wrap up in the bag.......on warm/hot nights, I would just leave the bag open and use the sheet.

 

I keep thinking about getting one of these and giving it a try. hennessy hammock

 

A tent is more practical, but I usually end up sleeping in my hammock when I go camping anyway.

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What about hiking/walking shoes? I find my riding boots are ok for walking around the office, but are not good for hiking or out-door walking.

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I keep thinking about getting one of these and giving it a try. hennessy hammock

 

A tent is more practical, but I usually end up sleeping in my hammock when I go camping anyway.

 

 

I just returned from a trip where my traveling companion used one of these. When I saw it, I asked him what he was going to do if there were no trees. His answer? "There are always trees."

 

Well... that statement isn't exactly correct. The first night out, there weren't any trees close enough. The second night out the trees were too close together, but this was better than the first night. The third through sixth nights had us arriving at campgrounds EARLY so that we could scout out "the perfect trees."

 

On the positive side...

 

1. He was able to set up and tear down much more quickly than I could deploy my tent and set up my cot. (A fact that he kept reminding me of. All I thought was: Gee, we could have put more miles behind us if we didn't stop early to scout trees. Or, if you count the time scouting the perfect trees, I'm willing to bet that the times are at least equal!)

 

2. It packed much smaller/lighter.

 

3. For the nights he didn't end up on the ground, he said it was comfortable. He still needed a sleeping pad for insulation, though, so you'll still need to pack one of those.

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I keep thinking about getting one of these and giving it a try. hennessy hammock

 

A tent is more practical, but I usually end up sleeping in my hammock when I go camping anyway.

 

 

I just returned from a trip where my traveling companion used one of these. When I saw it, I asked him what he was going to do if there were no trees. His answer? "There are always trees."

 

Well... that statement isn't exactly correct. The first night out, there weren't any trees close enough. The second night out the trees were too close together, but this was better than the first night. The third through sixth nights had us arriving at campgrounds EARLY so that we could scout out "the perfect trees."

 

On the positive side...

 

1. He was able to set up and tear down much more quickly than I could deploy my tent and set up my cot. (A fact that he kept reminding me of. All I thought was: Gee, we could have put more miles behind us if we didn't stop early to scout trees. Or, if you count the time scouting the perfect trees, I'm willing to bet that the times are at least equal!)

 

2. It packed much smaller/lighter.

 

3. For the nights he didn't end up on the ground, he said it was comfortable. He still needed a sleeping pad for insulation, though, so you'll still need to pack one of those.

 

Good to know.....thanks for the input. I can definitly see the possible negatives, but I would still like to give one a spin. Especially for short one or two night trips. If I was doing another long trip I would definitly be dragging a tent along.

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I keep thinking about getting one of these and giving it a try. hennessy hammock

 

A tent is more practical, but I usually end up sleeping in my hammock when I go camping anyway.

 

 

I just returned from a trip where my traveling companion used one of these. When I saw it, I asked him what he was going to do if there were no trees. His answer? "There are always trees."

 

Well... that statement isn't exactly correct. The first night out, there weren't any trees close enough. The second night out the trees were too close together, but this was better than the first night. The third through sixth nights had us arriving at campgrounds EARLY so that we could scout out "the perfect trees."

 

On the positive side...

 

1. He was able to set up and tear down much more quickly than I could deploy my tent and set up my cot. (A fact that he kept reminding me of. All I thought was: Gee, we could have put more miles behind us if we didn't stop early to scout trees. Or, if you count the time scouting the perfect trees, I'm willing to bet that the times are at least equal!)

 

2. It packed much smaller/lighter.

 

3. For the nights he didn't end up on the ground, he said it was comfortable. He still needed a sleeping pad for insulation, though, so you'll still need to pack one of those.

 

Good to know.....thanks for the input. I can definitly see the possible negatives, but I would still like to give one a spin. Especially for short one or two night trips. If I was doing another long trip I would definitly be dragging a tent along.

 

I just hope your tent doesn't take up the extra space needed for your rubber chicken. thumbsup.gif

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Instead of the hennessy hammock, I'd suggest the Blue Ridge Hammock. The crossbar supports make a big difference in comfort and stability. Stability is important when trying to get into your sleeping bag while rocking back and forth. To see what I mean, try laying in your hammock and putting on a pair of rain pants. Even if you succeed, you'll draw a crowd of people laughing at your contortions. I'd also suggest adding a larger rain fly over the hammock; longer sides will keep the cold wind from whistling across your bottom.

Last thing to remember: everything in the hammock will migrate to the low point, i.e. you butt. Glasses, gun, flashlight, book (if you read at night), clothes you pealed out of, whatever--all end up next to or under your posterior. Make sure it has pockets or you can unzip the mosquito net and put the things on the ground outside before going to sleep.

 

I've used one backpacking for several years. It's strictly a warm weather choice. If I have to add a pad under me for warmth, I end up with more weight than my bivey sack set up.

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For two-up camping you must really utilize space, especially when dry camping (i.e. NO hotels, restaurants, etc). Here is a picture of the Mags Bag setup on the RT for both of our junk.

img_5303.jpg

 

For light weight it's hard to beat a Black Diamond First Light tent at 2.9 lbs which I now use.

Also, a down sleeping bag at under 2 lbs and 3/4 length Prolite 3 thermarest or equivalent really cuts down the weight. Freeze dried food, and a water purifier helps too so you don't carry extra heavy food goods and water (as long as you camp near a water source).

 

img_5318.jpg

 

Here is a picture of the F650GS with WAY too much stuff on it. Gear weight will be reduced by 50% for my Baja trip this October. I'm removing the Givi case and use Ortlieb dry bags instead (like the red one).

 

img_3690.jpg

 

Only bare essentials will be taken. Minimal lightweight clothes and tools. My buddy and I will also try not to duplicate items (i.e. I'll take my small air pump. He will carry tubes. Stuff like that. It's amazing how much weight can be shaved and how much stuff you really don't need to take.

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