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Why a trike?


UberXY

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This is a question, not a criticism.

 

I see more and more well made trikes on the road, both BMW and HD, and have heard that HD may be selling them off the floor.

 

I understand that if you have some medical issue that may prevent you from comfortably riding a motorcycle, a trike would be an awesome alternative. But more often than not, I see what appears to be able bodied people getting on and off of them.

 

So I wonder, if a person is capable of riding a two wheeled motorcycle, what is the atrraction of a trike?

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Jerry Johnston

My wife always thought they might be the answer for her since she's too short to reach the peddles on mine. I would imagine they haul a heavier load also. I see very few trikes in this area and last week end on a trip to Missoula (only 180mi away) I saw the most amount of trailers I've ever seen - over 50% were Goldwings with trailers. I apologize for getting slightly off your question.

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The missus rides a Lehman Trike- she prefers it to riding 2-up or 2 wheels. I get to ride it when it needs service.. It's fun to ride on short rides (under 300 mile days) but does require more effort to steer..

..Personal preference I guess. lurker.giflurker.gif

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So I wonder, if a person is capable of riding a two wheeled motorcycle, what is the atrraction of a trike?

 

Lots of reasons (apart from medical conditions):

 

1. Trikes give you (say) 90-percent of the 'motorcycle experience', but they're easier to ride especially for short-legged folks or those with low upper body strength.

 

2. Trikes require significantly less skill to ride than a motorcycle (IMHO).

 

3. If one chooses to ride a trike, you still get to feel like you're a motorcyclist and be identified as part of that community.

 

It's actually a reasonable alternative to riding a 'pure' motorcycle, and from what I've been told, a better (and safer) alternative to a sidecar hack.

 

T

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baggerchris

Some of the same reasons some folks like sidecars. In 1978 I added a sidecar to my chopper so's my new son could ride along with us. We had a ball on that old bike. There was an early Easyriders centerfold by Dave Mann, and I constructed the Chopper and sidecar to look just like that.

The fun factor was fantastic! Tanner still talks about it today.

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Isn't an M1 endorsement not required for a trike if it exceeds some particular weight? (too feeking tired to go digging for info tongue.gif )

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I often ride with a group called UMCI. It is an over 40 group. It's a splinter goup of the outfit that used to be called the 'retreads'until some political event caused a parting of the ways.

Most of these folk have been riding for at least 50 years. They have a hard time giving up riding and the social connections that go with the club events. Many of these folk when faced with the physical challenges aging and the limitations that come with it, choose to go to a trike rather than give up on their love of "motorcycles"

and the life long friends and social structure.

At age 54 I am often the youngest member at events. Sometimes it is really dificult to deal with the 'geriatric'riding styles and pace. But then I think, in twenty years I hope I'm still able to get out on some sort of machine that resembles a motorcycle and do what I love to do with friends that enjoy riding and camping.

Then I pass the old farts in the twisties like they were parked and wait for them in the straight aways.

They understand my youthful needs. I understand their love of riding and limitations.

So, for the old farts on trikes, I say cut them some slack on the value judgements. For the under 70 year olds, I don't know what turns their crank.

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Isn't an M1 endorsement not required for a trike if it exceeds some particular weight? (too feeking tired to go digging for info tongue.gif )

 

In Kalifornia, you need a M1 to ride a trike....unless it is enclosed (like the meter maid trikes)...The Drivers handbook says that you don't, but all the LEOs look at the registration. They are registered as motorcycles, not cars hence the requirement..... lurker.giflurker.gif

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Did somebody say that one reason for riding a trike is "low upper body strength" ? I don't think so. I rode one just to see what it was like and I can tell you, you will get an "upper body workout" on a trike. It requires almost constant bar pressure to keep it on track, and in turns you'll get a real wake-up call your first time on a trike...keeping your body vertical when centrifugal force is trying to throw you to the outside of the turn. I really missed the coordinated turns, the leaning, and I knew immediately that it wasn't for me...at least not at this stage in life. But later on, who knows..... tongue.gif

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2. Trikes require significantly less skill to ride than a motorcycle (IMHO).

 

Trikes require a different set of skills than a motorcycle, but I wouldn't say less skill. It's also a skill set that few have any experience with. While most people have experience on four wheels with cars and two wheels with bicycles, few have much experience with three wheels. After all, how long did we really ride our "Big Wheels"? smile.gif

There's a reason that 3 wheeled ATV's are no longer sold and it isn't because it took less skill to operate them.

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I'm going to ride the new CanAm 3 wheeler with two front wheels in the front when it comes out. It shouldn't have the heavy front end feel of a regular trike.

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there is a guy on the golwing site that trikes. he has no legs and has it rigged to shift and brake with his hands. he also carries his wheelchair on the bike.

he has a great attitude and anytime someone bitches about sore legs, feet, heat from engine he always chimes up.

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Did somebody say that one reason for riding a trike is "low upper body strength" ? I don't think so.

 

Yup. I said that. Lessee, I would hazard to guess that a motorcyclist with, say, a separated shoulder (and therefore low upper body strength), if given the choice, would choose to ride a trike through stop and go city traffic than, say, a K1200LT. Riding a trike doesn't require strong upper body strength to operate it. According to trike manufacturers (such as Lehman) that I've talked to, that's one of the great attractions for smaller riders and many women.

 

I'm not a particular fan of trikes, but that argument seems logical to me.

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2. Trikes require significantly less skill to ride than a motorcycle (IMHO).

 

Trikes require a different set of skills than a motorcycle, but I wouldn't say less skill. It's also a skill set that few have any experience with. While most people have experience on four wheels with cars and two wheels with bicycles, few have much experience with three wheels. After all, how long did we really ride our "Big Wheels"? smile.gif

There's a reason that 3 wheeled ATV's are no longer sold and it isn't because it took less skill to operate them.

 

I agree with some of your comments. While I agree that riding a trike requires a different skill set than riding a motorcycle, I do believe it's easier to ride a trike.

 

Take your eighty-year old granny, show her how to use a hand clutch and I'll bet you she can do nice tight figure eights on a trike in a few minutes. Now ask granny to do the same figure eight on a motorcycle. I'm gonna guess she'll have a little more trouble doing that on a two-wheeler.

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Did somebody say that one reason for riding a trike is "low upper body strength" ? I don't think so.

Yup. I said that. Lessee, I would hazard to guess that a motorcyclist with, say, a separated shoulder (and therefore low upper body strength), if given the choice, would choose to ride a trike through stop and go city traffic than, say, a K1200LT. Riding a trike doesn't require strong upper body strength to operate it. According to trike manufacturers (such as Lehman) that I've talked to, that's one of the great attractions for smaller riders and many women.

 

I'm not a particular fan of trikes, but that argument seems logical to me.

Tim, I am basing my opinion from actually riding a trike, not on the mfgrs. recommendations. I suggest you give it a try if you have not already done so! wave.gif

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