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Miriam

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I’ve heard it so often and always smile politely because it’s meant as a compliment, I’m quite sure of that. The tricky part is: Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? To build the necessary skills? Are we somehow less capable when it comes to operating heavy machinery? (Female drivers and all.)

 

First off let me say that I know there’s loads of women who can outride, outshine, outrank any male, but I’m just curious about on average, in general. Should we be judged in a different category, like in the Olympics? Once we master some level of roadcraft on a bike, has the way there been tougher for us than for most men?

 

I’m not asking for a battle or comparison of the sexes, I'd like to get a better handle on how to respond to the compliment though, by way of getting a bit more insight in just how rare a skill this is for women. Somewhat unusual yes, but much less so in the US I guess. Women ride their own bikes more (instead of pillioning) and often much heavier ones than women in W-Europe do.

 

Just curious what your take is on this.

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I’d find it offensive, even though it really is a compliment. The compliment part is only just “You ride really well…”

 

I think that statement is based on an expectation supported by a stereotype. frown.gif

 

 

wave.gif

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An area where I've seen females adapt much better to riding a bike well than males is in body position. They seem to be more flexible, on average.

 

Another area is in testosterone. They tend to be capable of less clouded judgment in competitive situations.

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Aluminum_Butt

Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? To build the necessary skills?

 

I think you have to define what it means to "ride well".

 

On the average, I think that men can ride can/do ride faster than women. On the average, I think that the spatial thinking abilities possessed by most men, along with our "waffle" brains (ability to focus on one thing and stuff everything else) serve us well on motorcycles. As men, we tend to measure how "well" we ride by how fast and smooth we are - that's less true around here, but I think there's always a sense of competition around groups of riders. That competition drives us to push harder (sometimes too hard). Here, that sense of competition more often gets channeled into taking advantage of learning opportunites.

 

If you measure "riding well" purely in terms of riding safely, I think women can certainly achieve that as well (if not better) than men. But the guys paying you that compliment aren't probably coming from that angle.

 

And, as you stated, there are women out there who can outride most any man.

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The tricky part is: Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? To build the necessary skills? Are we somehow less capable when it comes to operating heavy machinery? (Female drivers and all.)

 

First off let me say that I know there’s loads of women who can outride, outshine, outrank any male, but I’m just curious about on average, in general. Should we be judged in a different category, like in the Olympics? Once we master some level of roadcraft on a bike, has the way there been tougher for us than for most men?........

 

Just curious what your take is on this.

 

I think there is some truth - in GENERAL - that the road to proficiency for women on activities that have traditionally been 'men's games' has been a little tougher. I don't think it's anything innate though. I think it's by and large the differences in the way little boys and girls are raised and grow up. Little girls don't always have access to the same physical activities little boys do. While most little boys are off: playing army, football, etc. or riding their bmx bikes in the dirt - most little girls are off doing more 'girl' stuff.

 

Is it caused by societal pressures or simply by different preferences harbored within the genders? Personally - I don't know and don't care. But the bottom line is we tend to become REALLY good only at those things we spend a lot of time doing. A lot of the physical activities like sports - and maybe riding to a certain degree - really depend on muscle memory and hand-to-eye coordination. And it really shows when a prodigy starts their passion and 'training' really young. How many times have you heard about outstanding musicians who took up their instrument at a seemingly outrageously young age like 3 or 4? Or world class athletes who have been playing their respective sport since that age?

 

Again - I don't think it's anything innately different in the potential ability of the sexes. I think it's more an issue of experiences - especially while young. If it's true that most women take up the sport of riding later in life (and I've no idea if it's true or not - but my best guess is it is), then yeah - I think the road to proficiency CAN be harder, simply because learning new things in life tends to get a little more difficult as we advance in age and don't have those life experiences from our younger days to recall at will. And 'advanced in age' doesn't necessarily mean OLD. I was a tender 19 years old when I first learned how to ski - but I pale in ability compared to most who took up the sport when still a fairly young kid.

 

Just my $.02.

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We had a young female in the MSF class this weekend who was by far the best rider I've ever seen on the range, including me and the other rider coaches. At one point in the curve negotiation exercise, I pulled her over and told her to slow down, because she was going so fast I was afraid she was going to exceed the traction limits of the little on / off road yami. For you ridercoaches, we timed her at a 2.36 on the test after she slowed down alot. Ridiculous.

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Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? To build the necessary skills? Are we somehow less capable when it comes to operating heavy machinery? (Female drivers and all.)

I don't think so. I think the comments more address rarity than skill. It's not that it's harder, just that it's less frequent to see female riders (good or bad), so as a result female riders stand out more.

 

For evidence that females are just as capable of mastering "heavy machinery" one need to look no further than competition stunt flying. Many of the top competitors in the world are female.

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Miriam,

It isn't that women can't ride motorcycles. It is that in general, they don't have the interest in riding motorcycles. Their interest revolves around thier kids, hair, makeup, starbucks with the herd and other "girlfriend" activities. My ex wife, for example, she took the course, got her endorsement, I bought her a bike and she promptly put 51 miles on it. She did pretty good, but she was done with it. She will tell you that she still "someday" will ride. But I believe it is because her girlfriends, upon hearing her say she has her endorsment, would put her on high esteem for having done something so cool. But, the truth boils down to, even though it is so cool, she still doesn't have the motivation to put the time in and get really good. She just wants to appear cool without the effort.

 

Good women riders are an exception not due to anything other than lack of interest on most womens' part. So, men, when we encounter a good female rider will comment in such a way as you recieve. The whole statement IS a compliment. The compliment comes in two parts, first you are a good rider and the second part is because you have gone beyond what most women are interested in doing. I imagine you do it because you just genuinely like. You stand with a very small and unique group of women. When you get the compliment, I would just say, "Why thank you!" I wouldn't think of it any other way.

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russell_bynum

She just wants to appear cool without the effort.

 

Sounds like the vast majority of motorcyclists...regardless of gender.

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Response:

"And you don't smell bad for a man" or

"And you don't drag your knuckles as bad as most men" or

"Pig!"

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russell_bynum
Response:

"And you don't smell bad for a man" or

"And you don't drag your knuckles as bad as most men" or

"Pig!"

 

Nah.

 

Just say "Thanks! You were going pretty fast back there when I passed you."

 

cool.gif

 

Women generally have less ego than men. That means they don't have as much of the "Get out of my way, I know what I'm doing." attitude, so they're more likely to admit they don't know what they're doing and they need help. Women are disproportionally represented at Track Schools, for example. I don't know, but I'd be willing to bet the same is true with most rider training situations (MSF, etc)

 

Women do tend to not be as agressive or willing to push things. At the track, most of the women riders I encounter are riding better than many of the men there (by "better", I mean more precise, smoother, better body position) even though their laptimes might be slower. (Of course, that's a generalization and there are quite a few women who are blindingly fast and very agressive.)

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GoGo Gadget

As most people are saying, it is all about different interests by gender, not innate skill.

 

Most women are shocked to learn that I cook pretty well. I guess they assume that a married man would not cook. Is that sexist for them to make that assumption? Or is it just that many men have no interest in cooking beyond the basics, and once they find someone who can do it for them, they let them?

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She just wants to appear cool without the effort.

 

Sounds like the vast majority of motorcyclists...regardless of gender.

 

True. But I think that men in general will sucumb to peer pressure and at least ride the bike to the local hang out. My ex was content to just tell people she had a bike in the garage.

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As most people are saying, it is all about different interests by gender, not innate skill.

 

Most women are shocked to learn that I cook pretty well. I guess they assume that a married man would not cook. Is that sexist for them to make that assumption? Or is it just that many men have no interest in cooking beyond the basics, and once they find someone who can do it for them, they let them?

 

LOL. Amen to that. I am a GREAT cook and it has served me well over the years. Women have told me that I am a great cook for a man. Never took that as an insult cause it usually translated into romantic interest on the part of the woman.

 

 

Even my kids will say, "Dad, you are almost as good a cook as mom." I'm better than her but what do kids know.... wink.gif

 

You know, as a matter of fact, when I've met good women riders, my curiosity gets piqued as to whether they would make a good romantic partner. Without the riding aspect, I wouldn't have given them a second thought? Only Russell and Jamie know if riding partners make better lovers... grin.gif

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I’ve heard it so often and always smile politely because it’s meant as a compliment, I’m quite sure of that. The tricky part is: Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? To build the necessary skills? Are we somehow less capable when it comes to operating heavy machinery? (Female drivers and all.)

 

First off let me say that I know there’s loads of women who can outride, outshine, outrank any male, but I’m just curious about on average, in general. Should we be judged in a different category, like in the Olympics? Once we master some level of roadcraft on a bike, has the way there been tougher for us than for most men?

 

I’m not asking for a battle or comparison of the sexes, I'd like to get a better handle on how to respond to the compliment though, by way of getting a bit more insight in just how rare a skill this is for women. Somewhat unusual yes, but much less so in the US I guess. Women ride their own bikes more (instead of pillioning) and often much heavier ones than women in W-Europe do.

 

Just curious what your take is on this.

 

I ride a lot with women. And not just for work wink.gif

 

There is nothing like being passed by Mama Hoon, or my friend Angie who has a teddy bear on her RS. Bottom line is that gender has nada to do with riding.

 

To me, it sounds like you need to tell them "nice big bike must offset your small...." well you can fill in the blank.

 

Kaisr thumbsup.gif

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TN_R11_Girl

Perhaps an alternative reply: "Actually, I ride really well, period. But thanks!" as you wave and ride away thumbsup.gif

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I’ve heard it so often and always smile politely because it’s meant as a compliment, I’m quite sure of that. The tricky part is: Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? To build the necessary skills? Are we somehow less capable when it comes to operating heavy machinery? (Female drivers and all.)

 

First off let me say that I know there’s loads of women who can outride, outshine, outrank any male, but I’m just curious about on average, in general. Should we be judged in a different category, like in the Olympics? Once we master some level of roadcraft on a bike, has the way there been tougher for us than for most men?

 

I’m not asking for a battle or comparison of the sexes, I'd like to get a better handle on how to respond to the compliment though, by way of getting a bit more insight in just how rare a skill this is for women. Somewhat unusual yes, but much less so in the US I guess. Women ride their own bikes more (instead of pillioning) and often much heavier ones than women in W-Europe do.

 

Just curious what your take is on this.

 

 

Miriam, I think you might be reading too much into the compliment you are getting.. Until you posted this I hadn’t really though about it.. You see I get the same type of “qualified” compliment quite regularly, only in my case it isn’t a gender thing it is an age thing.. What I usually get is “ you ride pretty good for an old man” or “for a gray beard you aren’t afraid to drag a knee are you?” .. I usually just shoot back I had no idea I was going that fast as my eyes aren’t so good anymore so I can’t see the speedometer or road signs.. That usually gets a smile from the other person & my smile is kept hidden..

 

I ride with a varying group of mixed riders from time to time (I really like riding alone better but once in a while we all must herd up you know”.. In that group is a couple of very talented female riders that can put the shame to a lot of male riders (especially in low speed precision handling maneuvers).. They are not helping your cause any as one of those young ladies uses that same phrase that bothers you.. Every time she does something difficult or challenging she hops off the bike & says not bad for a girl eh..

 

Twisty

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TN_R11_Girl
In that group is a couple of very talented female riders that can put the shame to a lot of male riders (especially in low speed precision handling maneuvers).. They are not helping your cause any as one of those young ladies uses that same phrase that bothers you.. Every time she does something difficult or challenging she hops off the bike & says not bad for a girl eh..

Twisty

 

Twisty,

 

I wonder how much sarcasm is intended in the young lady's remark? My Dad and I had a long-running joke like that: "How'd I do Dad?" "Weeelll ... not bad for a girl."

 

This coming from the man that made it clear that I could do anything I wanted to do and be anything I wanted to be! smirk.gif

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John in VA
...I’ve heard it so often and always smile politely because it’s meant as a compliment, I’m quite sure of that. The tricky part is: Is it harder for women to learn to ride well? ... Just curious what your take is on this.

 

I suppose it's a backhand compliment. Any woman should be able to acquire riding skills equal to those acquired by men. However, I would think that, on average, most women have a built-in unfair advantage in having a somewhat lower overall center of gravity...?

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ShovelStrokeEd

I find the premise odd and the "for a girl" thing to be offensive.

 

I do think there is a difference between the sexes when it comes to complex physical/mental activities. I hold the opinion that most men will just assume they can do something physical until they are proven wrong. They mostly do all right at this till they get to something like riding a motorcycle. Doesn't stop them from getting on it and trying anyway and some even survive. Most of the women I have encountered riding have had at least some formal training or got taught by their S.O. and would not think of attempting to ride without being shown told how. I think there is a basic need to understand at some intellectual level before embarking on a physical activity that potentially is dangerous. Might be just testosterone.

 

The one time I had the pleasure of teaching a young lady to ride I was very pleasntly surprised at the number of questions she asked and how quickly she was able to translate the mental to the physical once she got the answers she was looking for. If you equate it to dancing you might better understand.

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Motorrad4fun

I have a wife that rides, a cousin and a sister. All have heard that comment and it is a source of good fun for us when we are out.

When it comes down to it, they ride well, it is a machine, and if you have the right one for you, female or male, you have the capability to ride well.

 

My cousins response to this usually goes something like this:

That is so cute of you to say, I worked so hard at it" She is a bit of a Smart A%^........

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Riding has many facets, and/or there are many perceptions about it, what it is. I'd expect to hear that "women do just fine" from most respondents, and that matches what I see about "The Great Bell Curve of Endeavor and Experience". There's a fat part of the curve, a bulk of the Riders, that have experienced also a great bell curve of the Riding spectrum. So, what I consider will tend to be rated about Women Riders, by males in particular, will be weighted heavily away from the ends of the curve: It will reflect the bulk of riding experiences, and not its extremes.

 

I'd agree that I see "women doing well" at the bulk of Riding endeavors. In fact, among the number of women Riders I've met, more of them "do above average" at that riding, so based in my own expectation about "average".

 

What I note about that is there are about 10% to 15% the number of female versus male Riders I'm thinking about - have experience about. That's already a "cream" of a feminine crop. Of just Women, these Riding Women fall way outside the fat part of that bell curve; They are already "special", perhaps talented, privileged (with resources), confident, and most of all determined. As Women. With that going for them, I'd easily accept the performance I see; Accept/Expect easily what I'm seeing.

 

Please note, to this point, I'm describing a very similar circumstance to Males, and Male Riders. Female and Male Riders: These are two special, expressive and more competent segments of their gender. Hail both. And equally... if you will or want.

 

What falls into the more extreme areas of riding to me? Certainly racing would, and the fast sport riding that mimics it on public roads. I don't see many women doing that, and none I've known, while "very good", would ride with a Fast Group at that. It's about the same experience about "tough mountain tracks", vigorous but not fast sport riding on sandy and decidedly secondary mountain roads. Also like that are pure dirt riding (non-MX) and dual sport riding. All these call for high strength, and "fearless", assertive behavior.

 

On the other hand, I've noticed that a greater percentage of women Riders I know do quite well at the endurance aspects of safely (alertly) covering long distances and riding duration in Touring, and light sport touring rides. But when Sport Touring "turns tough", the women I've known haven't wanted to maintain high pace. There are only a few guys who are not just willing, but happy to ride with me at my favorite mode of riding, like Moab, to Gunnison, the hard way, in 9 hours. And, no women.

 

I believe it would by kindly said, the women have better sense. I don't mind being left on the other side of the fence by my own remark.

 

 

Best wishes.

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I find the premise odd and the "for a girl" thing to be offensive.

 

I do think there is a difference between the sexes when it comes to complex physical/mental activities. I hold the opinion that most men will just assume they can do something physical until they are proven wrong. They mostly do all right at this till they get to something like riding a motorcycle. Doesn't stop them from getting on it and trying anyway and some even survive. Most of the women I have encountered riding have had at least some formal training or got taught by their S.O. and would not think of attempting to ride without being shown told how. I think there is a basic need to understand at some intellectual level before embarking on a physical activity that potentially is dangerous. Might be just testosterone.

 

The one time I had the pleasure of teaching a young lady to ride I was very pleasntly surprised at the number of questions she asked and how quickly she was able to translate the mental to the physical once she got the answers she was looking for. If you equate it to dancing you might better understand.

 

ShovelStrokeEd, I have a good friend that teaches riders education (both college level & dealer level).. I have a lot of respect for that man as he really takes his job seriously & does his best to teach new riders to survive.. Your comment above __“The one time I had the pleasure of teaching a young lady to ride I was very pleasantly surprised at the number of questions she asked and how quickly she was able to translate the mental to the physical once she got the answers she was looking for. If you equate it to dancing you might better understand”.. That brings back a conversation I had with him a while ago.. We were talking about one of his classes one day & I asked him who his best students were figuring he would say something like older mature new riders.. He said that on the average his best students are young women.. Basically he said they are usually not the most talented but they more than make up for it by listening to all he has to say.. He also said that the worst students were young men with some riding experience as they through they knew it all & didn’t listen so therefore failed a lot of the exercises..

 

Twisty

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My experience as an instructor of riding matches your and Ed's theme. My favorite students at Golf, Shooting, and Riding are young, pre-majority females, generally, girls.

 

They have seemed willing to go try what's been presented to them. They end up with success most often. When not, they come back wanting to understand what went awry for them, get that, and retry, usually getting it the second time or soon. Their male counterparts fight with it, and are much more accepting of "getting by" at some skill, and "making do" with that. As things get more complex, they fail... and need to be taken back to the initial failure point if they are to gain full competence and success.

 

I posted earlier in this thread and remarked about "'fearless', and assertive". With women, girls in particular, overcoming a fearful aspect, or consideration, associated with some new action or skill, when they are able to focus on the task at hand, the action(s) actually required, their attention is off the fearful aspect and they get on with it. They show (and tell) they are able to reason out how to succeed at that task, based in their sound understanding of its precedents, the akills and understandings to that point that will be called upon. When they then "get with it", they are quite Fearless, and will scare the s*it out of their male companions, even intimidating them, bumping them out of the way (as in dirt riding) in the sense of "Get out of my way so I can do my magic thing here."

 

It's one of the most beautiful sights in my life to see that.

 

 

Best wishes.

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Les is more

Their interest revolves around thier kids, hair, makeup, starbucks with the herd and other "girlfriend" activities.

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

I would have answered sooner but I ran down to Home Depot to see if I could find Michael a broader brush--no luck.

 

 

 

I've also heard the comment many times, Miriam. A few times I've had guys catch themselves and tell me that they were going to say, "for a woman but heck you ride well...for anybody." grin.gif

 

I think that things are changing. I believe it's more common these days to find women who have been raised with fewer cultural boundaries--who have more of a "beyond gender" attitiude about their skills and what's possible. There have always been women who rise beyond more traditional upbringing to widen their ideas of what they can do, it just seems that the societal definition of what's "allowed" has been pushed forward quite a bit in the last several decades. More and more the "I'm not supposed to" message is being supplanted by "Why not" and "Of course I can."

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Their interest revolves around thier kids, hair, makeup, starbucks with the herd and other "girlfriend" activities.

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

I would have answered sooner but I ran down to Home Depot to see if I could find Michael a broader brush--no luck.

 

LOL. I think my brush is "broad" enough thank you.

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I’m not asking for a battle or comparison of the sexes, I'd like to get a better handle on how to respond to the compliment though, by way of getting a bit more insight in just how rare a skill this is for women. ...

 

 

Just curious what your take is on this.

 

You could say "Motorcyclist isn't gender specific; riding is riding." OTOH, do you want to educate every guy who's just making lame albeit well intended compliment ?

Me, I'd say "Thanks a bunch, where's the beer ?"

 

Wooster whose home economics teacher under 7th grade eyes launched her dirt bike into a stock pond

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I think maybe it is harder for my wife than me. She has less strength, height, leg and weight. Consequently she has to be a better rider.

 

She has less ability to recover from a poorly executed stop or start with less strength and leg. She has less ability to lean the bike with less weight. She has less vision over the road with less height. Yet, we ride together on big bikes (RTs). I think she uses focus and concentration, she has learned to plan ahead more than I.

 

She has been riding since she was a mite, and I have three years experience. I honestly don't think I could ride the RT with her size (5'2") and strength without dropping it all the time. There is no doubt she is the better rider in so many little ways.

 

But I don't think that excuses the comment, I would hope that sort of thing never slipped out of my mouth.

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We had a young female in the MSF class this weekend who was by far the best rider I've ever seen on the range, including me and the other rider coaches. At one point in the curve negotiation exercise, I pulled her over and told her to slow down, because she was going so fast I was afraid she was going to exceed the traction limits of the little on / off road yami. For you ridercoaches, we timed her at a 2.36 on the test after she slowed down alot. Ridiculous.

 

In the class I took there were three females. Two older ladies with thier husbands and one college girl. The college girl obiliterated all of us. You could see, by the middle of the class, how comfortable she had become with the bike.

 

While women have physically smaller brains their hemishperes are more interconnected. This give them an advantage over men on multitasking skills.

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Thanks all for making a few things clearer. I recognize the learning ‘girl-style’ as opposed to guys. I’m not too tall myself, 5.5, and have compensated by taking classes and everything that was offered in them, just the ‘young’ part doesn’t apply here because I started becoming serious about learning to ride well not until my late thirties. Also I think you’re right when you talk about expectation. It’s a bit of a surprise for all of the reasons mentioned. I especially share Russell’s sense of humour there:

 

Just say "Thanks! You were going pretty fast back there when I passed you."

 

I’ll try that one out for sure if I get a chance! Mostly what I do now is just kind of nod and say something about the ease of riding a GS, anybody can do that, kind of thing. Put myself down a bit. Especially because when it comes to the really slow stuff I’m not as competent as I’d like to be (I do go to the parking lot!). From your responses I’m inclined to change that though, as I have worked hard to get to this point and I think I’ll try out taking the compliment as a recognition of my efforts.

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MSF Rider coach here, I would rather coach females any day, they are more open to ideas and willing to try. I coach with a number of Lady Rider Coach's that could ride circles around most men.

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I don't even bother trying to keep up with the woman riders around here.

Especially if they have a "Rides Like a Girl" license plate frame. smirk.gif

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I would have answered sooner but I ran down to Home Depot to see if I could find Michael a broader brush--no luck.

Hee hee! That's the best line I've heard all week!

 

'course it's only Tuesday!

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...... just the ‘young’ part doesn’t apply here because I started becoming serious about learning to ride well not until my late thirties.

 

Out of curiosity, Miriam - do you think there were activities and/or experiences you did as a child that may have helped you excel in your riding? I often wonder if there is such a thing as a 'natural' or if it's just a big compilation skills and talents we're acquired over the years that can crossover into other skilled activities.

 

Your thoughts?

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TN_R11_Girl
Especially if they have a "Rides Like a Girl" license plate frame. smirk.gif

 

Oooh!! I want one!! Where can I find them?? smile.gif

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Send a pm to Laney, she has had one for years. She is another very good rider...and I don't mean for a girl. wave.gif

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Laney may have had it specially done at a mall kiosk or something like that; I think those little license plate frame stands can put whatever you want on it for you, but she can tell you for sure.

 

There are T-shirts with "I ride like a girl" on them too, available at Hottie RockStar, but most of the girl t-shirts are now sold out. However, they do sell men's t-shirts with this slogan on it, and those are still available...now THAT would be funny to see...a guy wearing a "I ride like a girl" t-shirt!! thumbsup.gif A lot of the ladies at Femmoto were sporting these t's.

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Especially if they have a "Rides Like a Girl" license plate frame. smirk.gif

 

Oooh!! I want one!! Where can I find them?? smile.gif

 

PM on the way.

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Their interest revolves around thier kids, hair, makeup, starbucks with the herd and other "girlfriend" activities.

lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

I would have answered sooner but I ran down to Home Depot to see if I could find Michael a broader brush--no luck.

 

 

 

I've also heard the comment many times, Miriam. A few times I've had guys catch themselves and tell me that they were going to say, "for a woman but heck you ride well...for anybody." grin.gif

 

I think that things are changing. I believe it's more common these days to find women who have been raised with fewer cultural boundaries--who have more of a "beyond gender" attitiude about their skills and what's possible. There have always been women who rise beyond more traditional upbringing to widen their ideas of what they can do, it just seems that the societal definition of what's "allowed" has been pushed forward quite a bit in the last several decades. More and more the "I'm not supposed to" message is being supplanted by "Why not" and "Of course I can."

+1 to all of it!

n

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Couchrocket

I think the comments more address rarity than skill.

I think this is correct. Men are surprised somewhat to see women riding, given that the "acceptability / commonality" of such (for the myriad reasons we could drone on about endlessly) is a somewhat recent thing. So, given the "only recent" larger numbers of women riders, seeing one truly advanced in skill is even "more rare" "at the moment."

 

The history of the suppression of women contaminates this to some extent, no doubt, but in general I'd take the compliment in this context.

 

Men and women are different and our physical differences make us better, or worse, depending on the arena we're discussing. But the truth is that the "overlap" where both women and men have equal potential in areas of endeavor is much larger than any of us, male of female, have been willing to embrace. The times they are a changing, for the good.

 

As I saw women enter the fire service, I realized that even in this arena where the "average man" has a natural physical advantage over the "average woman," there are those females who can and will excel. On the "extremes" of our differences the numbers of males / females participating at high levels will always be small, I think, but in areas like motorcycling where the physical demands are well within the limits of the "average" of both genders, the day will come when gender differences will not only be irrelevant, they'll be acknowledged as irrelevant, without comment.

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... it's just a big compilation of skills and talents we've acquired over the years that can crossover into other skilled activities.

Yes goes for me too. Also there’s another factor.

 

I was never the stereotype girl with her dolls. No tomboy either, I’ve always loved wearing a dress. As women go there is the spectrum from very girlie girls to quite manly women. The latter are/were more likely to ride a big bike than the former. I think that’s part of the expectation that was talked about, as I’m quite feminine people expect me to ride pillion or at the very least be on the smaller Yamaha my husband rides.

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Especially if they have a "Rides Like a Girl" license plate frame. smirk.gif

 

Oooh!! I want one!! Where can I find them?? smile.gif

 

Riding like a girl is a good thing. lmao.gif

 

rideslikeagirlsmall.jpg

 

My license plate frame was inspired by the enthusiastic comments of those great guys at Irv Seavers. They worked so hard to help me understand that all my mechanical issues stemmed from my girlish style of riding and parking my KRS. I believe they also wanted to sell me a bridge, but I didn’t buy that either… tongue.gif

 

I had mine made at the local County Fair by a place that makes personalized frames. I know they're in So Cal but do nationwide mail or internet business. If I can find the name in my files, I'll PM you Shannon.

 

I’m happy to report that my license plate frame is only readable from the back of the bike, so - how about a show of hands for how many of you have had to watch that frame get smaller as it pulled away from you… grin.gif

 

Ouch - Michael, that brush was so broad I think you even got me, but I do have to give you points for the small “s” when you spelled starbucks

thumbsup.gif

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I’m happy to report that my license plate frame is only readable from the back of the bike, so - how about a show of hands for how many of you have had to watch that frame get smaller as it pulled away from you… grin.gif

 

Hi Laney...I admit it. wave.gif

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Ouch - Michael, that brush was so broad I think you even got me, but I do have to give you points for the small “s” when you spelled starbucks

thumbsup.gif

 

LOL. Love you too Laney.

 

Oh, and btw, maybe were not watching your plate.... wink.gif

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