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Michelin Pilot Road directional mounting confusion.


AviP

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I had Michelin Pilot Road tires on my RT and was putting on a second set when I realized that although the tread pattern is similar on both tires, the directional arrows seem switched. The rear seems correct while the front seems reversed. I am basing this based on a tread's ability to drain water away.

 

My earlier set seems to be the same way too. But my question is if one pattern works correctly why are they switched between front and right. Look at the photo below, you can verify the similar tread pattern.

 

If these tires were mounted to specification, the orientation in the photo would be from the front of the bike. Notice how the rear drains water away from the center while the front drains it towards the center.

 

Could this be to have the front hydroplane first as an early warning before it's too late? (just like production cars have extra understeer dialed in)

 

Also can somebody confirm their setup? I am thinking of mounting it the "wrong" way in the front because I did experience substantial front wheel hydroplaning which I attributed to the heavy rains and standing water I was riding in.

 

1900800L.jpg

 

TIA

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John Ranalletta

I'd suspect it has something to do with the facts that the rear tire is driven and the front isn't.

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Normal for a lot of sport street motorcycle tires. Go by the arrow on the sidewall only.

Ok, but any theories on why it is normal? It does seem contradictory that a similar pattern (it would be the same if the widths were the same) has arows pointing different ways. Obviously Michelin has a good reason to do so.

 

Does my theory that it is so that the front hydroplanes first creating understeer hold any merit?

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duckbubbles

I remember that in the early dawn of motorcycling, at least for me, you would sometimes mount a rear tire on the front. When doing so, you would mount it for backwards rotation.

Think about it- the torque applied to the rear tire is to drive the bike forward.

The torque applied to a front tire is to slow the bike or drive it in reverse.

 

Frank

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I had Michelin Pilot Road tires on my RT and was putting on a second set when I realized that although the tread pattern is similar on both tires, the directional arrows seem switched. The rear seems correct while the front seems reversed. I am basing this based on a tread's ability to drain water away.

 

My earlier set seems to be the same way too. But my question is if one pattern works correctly why are they switched between front and right. Look at the photo below, you can verify the similar tread pattern.

 

If these tires were mounted to specification, the orientation in the photo would be from the front of the bike. Notice how the rear drains water away from the center while the front drains it towards the center.

 

Could this be to have the front hydroplane first as an early warning before it's too late? (just like production cars have extra understeer dialed in)

 

Also can somebody confirm their setup? I am thinking of mounting it the "wrong" way in the front because I did experience substantial front wheel hydroplaning which I attributed to the heavy rains and standing water I was riding in.

 

1900800L.jpg

 

TIA

 

TIA, as mentioned above just mount the tires with the arrows pointing towards rotation direction.. (they are designed to be used that way ONLY)

 

The arrow of rotation is kind of twofold.. The first being a safety thing as the tires have ply overlap that is directional so they really should rotate under road load in the stated arrow direction.. The second is a noise thing as the direction of rotation is set up to allow the sipes to meet the road in the designed angle/direction.. The sipe directions & angles are more for noise & tire wear control than water drainage.. The water will work out the sipes from the center of the tire to the outside regardless of angle (their angle & direction is more to control how they meet the road under braking or accel loading).. In fact they would probably work better for water control if they were just straight, short, & wide) ..

 

Twisty

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DavidEBSmith

Does my theory that it is so that the front hydroplanes first creating understeer hold any merit?

 

Not unless the Michelin corporation has suddenly become psychopathic.

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Does my theory that it is so that the front hydroplanes first creating understeer hold any merit?

 

Not unless the Michelin corporation has suddenly become psychopathic.

They did. That's why they pulled out of the USGP a couple of years ago. lmao.gif

 

I called up Michelin today and got no explanation other than "it is for best traction". Hogwash! It's still contradictory.

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Does my theory that it is so that the front hydroplanes first creating understeer hold any merit?

 

Not unless the Michelin corporation has suddenly become psychopathic.

They did. That's why they pulled out of the USGP a couple of years ago. lmao.gif

 

I called up Michelin today and got no explanation other than "it is for best traction". Hogwash! It's still contradictory.

 

AviP, there is just no way ANYONE would design, recommend, or otherwise want a motorcycle FRONT tire to loose traction first.. Unlike an automobile that would mean the bike would have to be laid over even more to stay on line through a corner & that is a for sure crash on wet or slippery roads.. A slight rear tire slide you can handle but a front tire slide mandating more lean angle yet is certain disaster on wet of slippery roads..

 

Twisty

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I used Metzlers on my Yamaha RZ race bike in the olden days. They were superb in the rain, and their sipes ran the same way (i.e. 'forward').

I just read a thread the other day about how one of the tire manufacturers changed the directional arrow on one of their tires because they worked better going the other way. I assume the tire had a zero degree belt pattern so the belts orientation didn't cause problems - either that or the belt pattern really doesn't mean nuthin'.

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DavidEBSmith

I called up Michelin today and got no explanation other than "it is for best traction". Hogwash! It's still contradictory.

 

Why aren't you working as an engineer for Michelin so they can get this stuff right? wink.gif

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I called up Michelin today and got no explanation other than "it is for best traction". Hogwash! It's still contradictory.

 

Why aren't you working as an engineer for Michelin so they can get this stuff right? wink.gif

Thanks for the sarcasm but lawyers, not engineers, run big corporations.

 

You must admit that it is an interesting question and no one has come up with an answer. clap.gif We just accept it. eek.gif

 

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